Photo Accessory News

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C.A. Boylan  |  Mar 28, 2012  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2012  |  0 comments

Free ArcSoft Perfect365 Software For One-Touch Photo Makeovers
Perfect365 is a free photo makeover software application that lets you easily adjust up to 21 facial features on pictures and portraits with the touch of a button. The patented imaging and facial recognition technology offers fast cleanup with accurate, natural results. Style makeup templates are included for various looks with the ability to fine-tune according to your preference. Perfect365 is available as a free download for Windows. An enhanced version for Windows that allows you to save and print high-resolution images is available for $29.99. Versions for the iPhone and iPad are currently available and the Facebook and Mac versions will be available soon.

 

George Schaub  |  Mar 26, 2012  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2012  |  4 comments

Backing up images while on the road makes sense; having a backup drive that can take the rigors of the road seems to make even more sense. That’s the idea behind the ioSafe Rugged Portable USB 3.0, available in various configurations, including SSD (Solid State Drive) and HDD (Hard Disk Drive), capacities, and aluminum or titanium covers. Regardless of the enclosure, the unit is dubbed shockproof (drops from 20 feet with the SSD and titanium enclosure with the optional “skin”), waterproof (submersible up to 10 feet for three days in aluminum, or 30 feet in titanium), and dustproof even in sandstorms, and even during ice storms for 24 hours. And, you’re also covered if you happen to drop it into a barrel of oil (up to 12 feet for an hour) or climb above 15,000 feet (aluminum) or 30,000 feet (titanium). To back up their guarantees the company includes a one-year replacement and one-time data recovery guarantee (up to $5000 on the data side).

David B. Brooks  |  Mar 15, 2012  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2012  |  8 comments

If you are a serious digital photographer you probably have a good D-SLR camera. And you expect it will capture sharp, finely focused, high-quality photographic images. It follows that the display you choose should be capable of reproducing all the attributes and qualities your camera has recorded. Most of the displays sold with computers in box stores, however, are not much better at reproducing photographs than the old-type big and heavy CRTs we had back in the mid-1990s.

C.A. Boylan  |  Feb 24, 2012  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2012  |  0 comments

Nik Software Color Efex Pro 4 This is the latest version of Nik’s popular digital photographic filters for image retouching and enhancement. Color Efex Pro 4 is easy to use and offers a new generation of technologies and features that help you to create stunning effects. It has stackable filter combinations, visual presets, filter recipes, and new filters such as Detail Extractor, Vintage Film Efex, and Image Borders. The software also includes a History Browser, improvements to imaging algorithms, greater performance, and enhanced usability. The Color Efex Pro 4 Complete Edition contains 54 filters for a suggested retail price of $199.95. The Select Edition contains 25 filters for $99.95. You may also upgrade to the Complete Edition from any edition of Versions 2.0 or 3.0 for $99.95.

Jack Neubart  |  Feb 16, 2012  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2012  |  0 comments

My impression of a tabletop tripod was probably like yours—a squat, three-legged support that collapsed down to handily fit inside a camera bag. After unpacking the 17 camera supports that arrived, I had to modify my definition of the genre to include designs that mushroom to roughly 2 feet when fully open—and some with considerable girth and heft. That also meant extending my thinking to models with a center column and multiple leg sections, which might be more correctly termed “mini” tripods. Either way, in contrast to a standard tripod at its full height, the tripods under discussion, when fully open, have a small footprint and should effortlessly fit in tight spaces.

Jay Miller  |  Feb 10, 2012  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2012  |  0 comments

I’ve been a dedicated gimbal head user for a long time. If you shoot with seriously long lenses, no other head comes close to offering a gimbal’s stability, articulation, and flexibility. Forget ball heads and anything else designed to attach long telephotos to a tripod. If you’re a big lens user and you photograph things that move, a gimbal is the only way to go.

C.A. Boylan  |  Feb 03, 2012  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2011  |  0 comments

Nikon 1 J1 Camera
The new Nikon 1 J1 is a compact system camera that features a 10.1-megapixel CX-format high-speed AF CMOS sensor. It has a dual core image processor and an advanced hybrid autofocus system that provides the user with fast AF with 73 focus points. The J1 can also capture 10 frames per second (fps) with a full resolution continuous shooting speed of 60 fps (AF locked). The camera comes with Short Movie Creator software and My Picturetown and features a Smart Photo Selector mode that allows the camera to select the best photo from a series of images based on a number of factors, including exposure, composition, focus, and facial recognition. The color choices with matching kit lenses include white, pink, red, silver, and black. The suggested retail price for the J1 10-30mm lens kit is $649.95.

David B. Brooks  |  Jan 26, 2012  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2011  |  1 comments

I often get questions about how to store digital image files safely and securely. Although there have been a lot of options, all of them have involved compromises. Recently, however, one of our readers told me about Millenniata.com, and I immediately looked into this new American company. I found that Millenniata has a new DVD disc technology that provides “more than” archival life expectancy, as established by the US Department of Defense’s Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division at China Lake, California. Their report can be downloaded as a PDF file from the Millenniata website.

Jay Miller  |  Jan 20, 2012  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2011  |  1 comments

Like most of you, I’ve been frustrated by the amount of dust that accumulates not only on my sensors but also on my cameras and lenses in general. It’s an ongoing battle. Take photos, clean cameras; take photos, clean cameras.

David B. Brooks  |  Jan 19, 2012  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2011  |  7 comments

It has been some time since anentirely new hardware andsoftware display color management system was introduced. X-Rite, the world’s largest color management manufacturer, now has a new i1Display colorimeter and next generation i1Profiler software. First of all, the new i1Display Pro is designed to accommodate all kinds of computer displays, including standard home/office models, wide color range displays, LED backlit LCD displays, laptops, and projector displays. The new colorimeter is a very flexible and convenient instrument design capable of measuring displays directly, as well as projected on a screen, plus ambient environmental illumination, all in one instrument. This new i1Display colorimeter is also capable of measuring a display at full screen to evaluate flare, and correct for it. It also features ADC, or Automatic Display Control, to manage a display’s internal controls and eliminate manual adjustments. Added to this comprehensive package is the Pantone management system for spot colors. A set of different methods of validation is available to measure the result of calibration and profiling with user-defined pass/fail tolerances.

 

Art Ketchum  |  Dec 15, 2011  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2011  |  0 comments

Over the years I’ve photographed hundreds if not thousands of models and subjects on muslin, canvas, and other background materials, and in many unique settings. I’ve had the privilege to shoot many magazine covers, dozens of catalogs, and ads for magazines.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2011  |  0 comments

When I say filter, your first thought may be a Photoshop plug-in. That’s natural, especially if your first good camera was digital. But folks who cut their photographic teeth shooting 35mm film know all about the light-bending qualities of glass screw-in filters. Physical filters were once the best (and sometimes only) way to get certain types of creative shots. Although still as effective as ever, they’ve fallen from favor for several reasons.

C.A. Boylan  |  Dec 05, 2011  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2011  |  0 comments

In this month’s Roundup we offer an introduction to a sampling of backdrop companies with products ranging from cloth to paper to virtual. Space prohibits us from covering their often extensive product lines, so we encourage you to follow up by contacting them directly. Many offer online as well as printed catalogs.—Editor

C.A. Boylan  |  Nov 04, 2011  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2011  |  1 comments

Nik Software’s Snapseed is a photo application designed specifically for the iPad. It enables you to create amazing photos with a wide variety of filters and tools. Filter choices include Grunge, Vintage, and Drama. Snapseed features U Point technology in touch devices, bringing precise selective adjustments to change lighting, color, and more by simply touching and swiping the screen. Snapseed allows users to enhance, edit, and share their photos via social networks, e-mail, and even print via Apple’s AirPrint Wi-Fi printing standard. Snapseed for the iPad is available on the App Store (www.niksoftware.com/buysnapseedipad) for $4.99. Tutorial videos are available at: www.niksoftware.com/snapseed.

Jason Schneider  |  Oct 26, 2011  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2011  |  0 comments

The performance parameters of today’s cameras are flat-out astonishing. Many current entry-level and middle-tier D-SLRs provide image sensors with resolutions ranging from 12-18 megapixels (MP), burst rates of 5-7 fps, and full 1080p HD video capability. Sophisticated digital point-and-shoots are not far behind, with 10-14MP sensors, 720p or 1080p HD video, and respectable burst rates in the 3-5 fps range. Needless to say, pro and prosumer D-SLRs often exceed even these incredible specs, with sensors in the 20-25MP range, blistering burst rates up to 10 fps, deep buffers, and phenomenally rapid image processing software. Not surprisingly, flash memory manufacturers have responded with a veritable explosion of high-capacity, high-speed memory cards with incredible write speeds and an array of enhancements aimed at increasing reliability and security.

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