Nature Photography How To

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Ron Leach  |  Dec 12, 2016  |  0 comments

Photographer Tina Tormanen lives and works in the magical Lapland region of Northernmost Finland, and her images of this winter wonderland under the Aurora Borealis are absolutely breathtaking. 

Ron Leach  |  Dec 06, 2016  |  0 comments

Brendon Cremer is a wildlife and nature photographer known for his stunning images of exotic animals in Africa. Among his most spectacular photographs are those in which he shoots his subjects by moonlight.

Ron Leach  |  Nov 22, 2016  |  0 comments

Photographers have long been challenged when attempting to capture the splendor of big mountain ranges, both in terms of equipment and geography. In his quest to document Italy’s Dolomites, Kurt Moser decided to go really big, by converting a 45-year-old Russian military truck into a giant camera.

Ron Leach  |  Nov 21, 2016  |  0 comments

Petar Sabol Sharpeye is an award-winning Croatian photographer with a wide-ranging portfolio. One of his specialties is macro photography, and he’s created some unique images using a Meyer-Optik Goerlitz Trioplan 100mm f/2.8 “Soap Bubble” lens.

Dan Havlik  |  Nov 17, 2016  |  0 comments

As photographer Jessica Dyer writes about this incredible slow motion video of a hummingbird: “Wait for it…and turn on the sound.”

Ron Leach  |  Nov 07, 2016  |  0 comments

If you need some inspiration to get your creative juices flowing, look no further than these top entries in the 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest. The deadline for entries was last Friday, and the Editors at National Geographic have shared their favorites.

Ron Leach  |  Oct 06, 2016  |  0 comments

Yousef Al Habshi is an award-winning photographer based in Abu Dabi. He specializes in macro photography, and the spectacular images of insects you see here are part of his Little Monsters project.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 29, 2016  |  1 comments

The frost is on the pumpkin, folks, and that means it’s time to get ready for fall. Here are five things to have in mind as we slip from Daylight Saving Time into the long nights and short days of winter.

Staff  |  Aug 23, 2016  |  0 comments

While Shutterbug reader Robert Dunham dreams of shooting the vast landscapes in Montana, he has found “great wonder and satisfaction in shooting macro” at his North Carolina home. He combines his two favorite pastimes, gardening and photography, by “taking a bunch of gear to the garden and splitting time between the spade and the camera.”

Ron Leach  |  Aug 17, 2016  |  0 comments

Astrophotography is really popular these days, and this Lightroom tutorial from Rob & Jonas’ Filmmaking Tips will get you up to speed on how to capture amazing images of the night sky.

Ron Leach  |  Aug 11, 2016  |  0 comments

Photographing fireflies is a “thing” in Japan, where every summer photographers venture out in the early evening to capture these winged insects painting the landscape fantastic. These “lightnin’ bugs” also do their illuminating dance in the Southern United States, so you may want to try photographing their bioluminescence yourself.

Seth Shostak  |  Aug 09, 2016  |  0 comments

In real-world shoots, both camera and subject are often moving. Six generations of photographers have fought this problem in their quest for images as sharp as a zoot suit. And nowhere is this fact of photographic life more obvious than when you’re trying to freeze the movement of wildlife. Whether you’re bagging African megafauna or trying to capture backyard beetles, stopping the motion is part of the assignment. So how do you do it?

Staff  |  Jul 19, 2016  |  0 comments

Shutterbug reader Bill Tiepelman captured this profile of a beautiful red-bellied woodpecker in his backyard in Wentzville, Missouri. An avid bird watcher, Tiepelman has on old swing set in his backyard that he repurposed into a bird sanctuary in an effort to “attract as many species as possible.”

Josh Miller  |  Jul 12, 2016  |  0 comments

When it comes to bird photography, no species is more majestic and more sought after than the bald eagle. Its status as America’s national bird wasn’t always a sure bet (Benjamin Franklin wanted the turkey). Bald eagles also nearly went extinct during the 20th century from their eggshells thinning due to the proliferation of DDT. But today as a result of aggressive protections under the Endangered Species Act, as well as the banning of DDT, these beautiful birds have made a dramatic recovery.

Maria Piscopo  |  Jul 05, 2016  |  0 comments

For this month’s column, we look at how to turn your love for wildlife photography into a serious business. I interviewed the husband-and-wife team of David and Jennifer Hemmings who have been particularly successful in the wildlife photography field.

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