George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2005 Published: May 20, 2005 0 comments

My favorite book when I was a kid was the atlas. I would plan elaborate journeys through mountainous regions, follow the shipping news in The New York Times, and ogle the fascinating people and places in Life magazine while waiting for a haircut at the local barbershop. For me, getting there was the point and being there was the reward. I started my travel habit with bicycle trips...

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George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Dubbed "the world's smallest optical zoom digital camera," the Casio Exilim Card EX-S100 is business-card size at a mere 0.66" thick and just 3.46" at its longest dimension. But despite its size the EX-S100 yields excellent color files from its 3.2-megapixel chip and has a whopping...

George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

About a year ago I called up a stock agency to whom I'd been submitting 35mm and 6x7 slides for years and told them I was considering sending digital files. "Oh, don't worry about that, we scan your slides for you," they kindly replied. No, I told them, I want to start submitting files made...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 26, 2005 0 comments

There's lots to like about the new Olympus C-7000 camera, including the
size of the image files it puts out and the "seamless" 30X zoom
(5X optical and 6X digital combined) that delivers better quality digital zooms
than many cameras we've worked with in the past. The C-7000 is aimed at
those who like to get involved with their photography, and offers as many options
and modes as you could desire. They certainly make this a camera that allows
you to flex your creative muscles. Granted, you have to delve into the menu
to get at most of the options, something that helps streamline the body but
can hold up spontaneous changes.


Olympus C7000 camera from file (PMA)

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 19, 2005 0 comments

When shooting film, especially slide film, color rendition is a matter of
matching the film's "personality" with the subject at hand.
You can choose films with high or "normal" color saturation, contrast
and color response. These two photos of a colorful Christmas toy soldier in
New York's Rockefeller Center show the differences between saturation
renditions. With a digital camera you can program in color saturation, "warmth"
and even color contrast, making every frame you shoot like an individual selection
of film.


Color Low Saturation

 


Color High Saturation Warm

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 12, 2005 0 comments

For those who have been working with the latest digital cameras--both
integral and interchangeable lens types--you've probably seen an
option called Raw among your file formats. Unlike JPEG and TIFF, Raw is not
an acronym and therefore we don't capitalize it, and is just what it states--the
"raw" image date received by the sensor and digitized within the
microprocessor of the camera. It is not "raw" in the sense that
it is unfettered or unrecognizable, but it does take image processing software
other than what's in the plain version of some image processing programs
to see it. That Raw software converts the Raw image file format to an image
on the screen and allows you to save it to a format other than Raw--such
as TIFF or JPEG.

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

The portrait is one of the most demanding of all photographic tasks. We are asked to capture the character of a person in the brief, fleeting moment it takes to make an exposure. Painters seem to have the advantage, being able to take hours or days to render their impressions. They can block out forms and fill in the light and shadow as they see fit. What do we have to contend...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 29, 2005 0 comments

One of the reasons that many people are getting into making prints at home
these days is that inkjet prints are simpler to make and more permanent than,
in many cases, photographic prints (dye based projection, that is.) With recent
advances in ink and paper technology from companies such as Epson and HP we
now see the potential, given proper storage, of digital prints lasting more
than 100 years. Even snapshot size prints, according to Wilhelm Research, from
portable printers like the popular and relatively diminutive PictureMate from
Epson can last three generations or more. And most of the newer printers don't
even require the intermediary of the computer to make very good looking prints.

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 22, 2005 Published: Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

If you enjoy exploring the fascinating world of close-up photography you should consider a ring flash as an essential part of your creative kit. A ring flash mounts around your taking lens and eliminates problems associated with standard shoe-mount flash and even off-camera flash, mainly the inability to down-angle the...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 15, 2005 0 comments

The pixels that make up a digital image each have an "address",
a code that defines color, brightness and shades. When we make images with a
digital camera or from film with a scanner we are creating a matrix of pixels
that altogether create the illusion of a continuous tone image. These codes
are not dyes or even densities, but specific information as to how the computer
will interpret the colors and tonal values on the screen. It is only when we
make a print that we leave the "digital" world and enter the world
of dyes and pigments. Because each pixel has a code, basically a bunch of information
that is composed of bits and bytes, we can alter that code to change the "address",
or color and tonal look of every pixel. In this lesson we'll use the Replace
Color dialog box, found in most versions of Photoshop, or under other names
in other programs, to illustrate the point and give you an easy, fun way to
play with your pictures.

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