George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

Black and white photography has always held a special place in the hearts and minds of photographers. The charm of the medium is that it is so flexible in both technique and its ability to communicate many different moods and points of view. Consider the documentary photographer, who uses black and white to enclose images in a gritty realism that color somehow cannot match, or the...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2005 4 comments

All Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

I grew up with black and white. Color, for me, was a distraction, a pretty thing that was fine for stock and the family album, but the color of the photographic blood that ran through my veins was monochrome. I spent many a year in the darkroom, honing my black and white skills, and even paid the rent for a good many...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

One of the main benefits of SLR photography is that it allows you to make quick decisions and respond to what's happening in front of you with your heart, mind, and guts without fumbling around. It allows you to apply what you've learned about making pictures immediately, and is an instinctive response to...

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 18, 2005 0 comments

There are times when you want your color to exactly match what's in the
scene, but for the most part color is a fairly subjective matter that can be
tweaked with ease in just about any image-editing program. Color has a hue--like
yellow, green or blue--as well as a vividness, which in photography is
often called its saturation. In addition, color can have a cast, which is influenced
by the prevailing lighting conditions when we make the photograph. That cast
can be influenced by the light source itself, such as photographing under direct
sun versus what we'd get when photographing under tungsten lights, and
by the position of the subject in relation to that light source, such as the
difference between photographing in the shade or open light. In addition, color
can also be influenced by the recording medium itself, be it film or digital,
and how the film is made or the digital image processor is programmed to change
the color during the recording processing.

...

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 04, 2005 0 comments

High scene contrast always creates difficulties for photographers, whether
shooting film or digital. The difficulty stems from the difference between the
ways the film or sensor "sees" and how the human eye sees. Our eyes
are adaptive, and can resolve large variations in brightness by the way it scans
throughout the scene and the amazing reflex of automatically restricting and
dilating the pupil to adjust to bright and dark areas before us. While light
metering systems in cameras are impressive in the way they can read light, the
fact remains that at the moment of exposure the lens on a camera records a scene
at one fixed aperture, or opening. In most situations this is no problem, as
the meter averages light values and the bright and dark areas are distributed
through the recording medium properly. But high contrast presents a problem.

A
better solution is to use the --1 contrast setting. This
allows for smoother tonal gradations and addresses the need to
control the divergent light values in this backlit scene.

All Photos © George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2005 Published: Jan 04, 2005 0 comments

Imagine you're a kid with a very sweet tooth in the world's largest candy store. You're allowed to roam around the halls for five days, sampling whatever strikes your fancy. You're also in one of the world's largest slam dancing parties, sharing the space with 100,000 or so other such kids. That's the feeling one can get at photokina, the...

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2005 Published: Jan 04, 2005 1 comments

Our Picture This! assignment for this month was Neon City, a nighttime endeavor where we asked you to send us images of perhaps the most artistic form of lighting. Neon is an art form that comes and goes, one that has undergone a revival in recent years. But readers sent us samples of neon from likely sources, such as Las Vegas and New York, as well as vintage neon from the past.

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2005 0 comments

In this issue we bring you our photokina report, a series of articles from our reporters who covered the huge photo show held this past fall in Cologne, Germany. Exhibitors from over 150 countries covering every aspect of the photo and imaging trade were there, and we spent five days trekking the massive halls, speaking to engineers, designers, and marketing folk about the new...

George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Kodak DX7590 Quick Look
· Lightweight
· $499
· Customizable Settings

Further Information
Kodak EasyShare DX7590
http://www.kodak.com


Weighing in at a bit over 12 oz and...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 21, 2004 0 comments

There are many ways to work with monochrome images, including selective adjustment
of tonal values, contrast and even image color that can emulate toning. In this
installment of our Web How To's we'll play with colorization, adding
color to selective parts of a monochrome image that can make it look like a
combination hand-painted (with photo oils) and toned photograph. You can paint
in selectively with brush tools if you like, but this how-to deals with a more
simplified approach.

...

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