George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 27, 2005 0 comments

Commentary

A Look Back: Big Changes, but Some Things Have Remained the Same

by George Schaub

Thinking about the past is natural at this time of year, when part of what
we do is recognize change as being part of the natural cycle of life. In photography,
massive changes have taken place that affectedus...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

For this issue we asked our contributors to take what they have learned from the last year, mix in a good dose of what they might have heard from peers and manufacturers about what's on the drawing board, and come up with some predictions about what we might expect in the year ahead. Their essays make for fascinating reading, with each contributor discussing an aspect of the...

George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

Coming in at just over a 1/2" thick and weighing an unnoticeable 4 oz, the Casio EXILIM EX-S500 is a wonder of miniaturization, considering it has a 3x optical zoom and 5-megapixel sensor. This, the latest version of Casio's mini-digicams, also has what the company terms Anti Shake DSP (Digital Signal Processor) and a large 2.2" LCD screen for both taking and...

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George Schaub Posted: Nov 29, 2005 0 comments

Today's cameras are microprocessors with lenses. Most of us know how
to change color, sharpness and contrast, and even ISO settings, for every frame
we shoot, but did you know that you can also change how your camera's
dials and buttons work? By using Custom Function settings you can alter the
function of all those dials and buttons and personalize them to the way you
work, or to each unique shooting situation. When the camera comes out of the
box it has certain "default" settings, those chosen by the camera
manufacturer. While there is a certain wisdom in the defaults, they are not
necessarily the best way for your style or shooting needs.

...

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George Schaub Posted: Nov 01, 2005 5 comments

Here at Shutterbug we have followed the long and sometimes tortuous road toward getting quality black and white prints digital style. Readers, and we, have suffered through the rigors of metamerism, bronzing, and the associated color shifting and frustrated attempts to match what's on the screen with what comes out of the printer. We have tried duotones, third-party inks...

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George Schaub Posted: Nov 01, 2005 0 comments

Now that the Shutterbug Forums have been online for the last six months I can honestly say that they have been a success. We tried various topics and categories (and we're always open to your suggestions) and have honed them down to what we consider essential areas of interest. The feeling of success comes not so much from our creating the Forums but in how you, the readers...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

It's 10PM: Do You Know Where Your Pixels Are?

...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 05, 2005 0 comments

Willard (Bill) Clark, a photo industry icon and the former executive director
of Photoimaging Manufacturers & Distributors Association (PMDA), died on Sept.
24. He was 77 years old. Cause of death was cancer.



Mr. Clark was associated with the photo industry for more than 40 years primarily
in consumer and trade journalism, both as a writer and photographer, and more
recently with PMDA. He worked with the senior executives of virtually every firm
in the photo industry, serving as confidant and advisor to many and earning the
respect of all.



Mr. Clark came to New York as a photographer for United Press after working for
a small Ohio newspaper as a reporter and photographer. His equipment in those
days was a 4x5 Speed Graphic, standard issue for a news journalist at that time
but now seen only in photo museums and period movies. In 1954 he became associate
editor of U.S. Camera magazine and then founding editor of Camera 35 magazine.
"I was a staff of one," he once said. He subsequently was appointed
editor.



After a variety of other magazine publishing positions, Mr. Clark came back to
the photo industry in 1981 as editor and associate publisher of Photo Weekly Magazine,
which evolved into Photo Business Magazine. His final publishing stint was a short
one as editor of PTN.



Mr. Clark retired from his position as PMDA executive director earlier this year.



At the time of his retirement, some industry associates paid tribute to him. Stacie
Errera, chief marketing officer for Tamron USA, Inc., and current president of
PMDA, said, "Bill always acted as a professional and was liked by everyone.
Everything Bill did was in the best interest of the organization."



Dan Unger, Agfa's director of marketing and PMDA board member, said of Bill:
"He was an easy-going guy who did everything right."



Mr. Clark is succeeded by two sons, Paul, Ashland, OR, and Bruce, Hopewell, NJ,
both attorneys, and two granddaughters, Fiona, 3 ½ and Emmeline, 1. He
was pre-deceased by his wife, Olga.



Editor's Note: The notes on Bill's life were kindly
provided by Jerry Lansky. I knew Bill for almost twenty years and he was always
a class act, with a kind word and encouragement for all. His "How are you
doin', man!" greeting will always echo in my ears. Those fortunate
enough to have known and worked with him understand that he was a great contributor
to photography and the photo industry and a genuinely good soul. I will miss him
greatly.

--George Schaub ...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Many moons ago I was granted a few test rolls of the then-new Fujichrome Velvia 50. I happened to be in Las Vegas at the time, and curious just how saturated this touted high-saturation film might be I hiked around red rock country and exposed a few rolls. Having been a dedicated slide shooter and film tester for another photo mag I was pretty familiar with slide films and how...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Long the realm of commercial labs due to their cost and complexity, a new breed of large format printers are being aimed at photographers, both pro and advanced amateurs, who want to take control of their gallery, portrait, and wedding prints. New inks, simplified software, and vastly enhanced workflows make these printers attractive to photographers who make the commitment to...

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