Staff
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Picture This
Staff Mar 06, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 7 comments
There is a school of thought that says that all good human design is derived from patterns in nature, and that we have a natural sympathy for objects that echo what we see around us in the natural world. Indeed, even the most abstract of human creations, be it painting, architecture, or simple tools, all seem to stem from what nature has taught and revealed. The subject of this month’s Picture This! assignment is Patterns in Nature, where we requested readers to go out and find those most pleasing, often intricate, and quite mysterious designs that we discover in the natural world and reveal through composition, lighting, and point of view with our cameras.
Talking Pictures
Staff Mar 29, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 84 comments
I was touring in Merida, Spain, through Roman ruins. I had an image of columns, brick, and shadow lined up when a young girl in red flashed into my frame. Wow! With just a bit of serendipity I had captured old vs. contemporary, free form vs. ossification, modern meets old. For me, this was just a great moment. I processed this image in Lightroom and took the color out except for red, allowing even more stark contrast.
News
Staff Jan 20, 2012 2 comments
RTP, Rehabilitation Through Photography announces the election of Jackie Augustine to the position of President of the Board of Directors. Jackie is a 30 year veteran of the photographic industry. She served as Group Publisher of VNU/Nielsen’s Performance Group of Magazines and prior to that she was VP, Group Publisher of the High Technology Group of magazines at Primedia which included Petersen’s PHOTOgraphic and Shutterbug magazines. Currently she is the President of Jackie Augustine Consulting, a company focused on integrated media and marketing solutions. She is also a Member of the PMDA Board of Directors and Editor of the PMDA website.
Picture This
Staff Feb 07, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 6 comments
Our Picture This! assignment this month was Pen and Ink, in which we asked readers to send us images that emulated a pen and ink drawing, that is, reducing the image content to line, texture, and form. Software makes it easy to convert an image file to just about any type of illustrative format, from oil paint to pastels and more. There are many ways to achieve the effect, but as with all images it’s how the content matches the technique that counts. Readers sent in all types of subject matter and achieved the effect in various ways, all of which show how malleable images are these days and how working with software can open up new ways of seeing and sharing images.
Features
Staff Feb 15, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 0 comments
Tamron and Shutterbug magazine proudly announce the winners of the Tamron Nature Photography Contest.

Nature photography has long captured the hearts and minds of amateur and professional photographers dedicated to capturing images of the great outdoors. We received over 2,000 entries and selected three outstanding images.

Congratulations to all who entered and to the three winners who will each receive a Tamron lens.

Grand Prize
Donna Pagakis - San Diego, California

POETIC SYMMETRY
“As I was leaving the park, I noticed this Great White Egret, preening itself on the reflecting pond. The lighting was magical, at the time of evening, two hours before sunset. I placed my camera on the tripod and used continuous shooting mode, to capture as many frames as possible. The RAW file was processed with Bridge, Photoshop, Photomatix and Nik Software.”

Talking Pictures
Staff Feb 22, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 10 comments
While visiting the small island of Kökar in the Åland archipelago in Finland, I found this weathered fishing boat. This old boat tells a story of many years ago when herring fishing on Kökar was in its prime. No longer in use, the boat reminds us of the rich history of the island when hardy fishermen led courageous lives on the sea. Photographing the boat in early morning light, I was able to capture the nuances of its story. Since my ancestors originated from here, the boat gave a glimpse into my own history.
Newsletter
Staff Dec 15, 2011 0 comments
On The Cover
While we don’t offer a formal “Buyer’s Guide” for this time of year we thought we’d bring you a host of gift ideas that (only) a photographer might love, including tripod heads, tabletop tripods, and the always popular gimbal mounts. And for good measure we mixed in a roundup of today’s most fashionable camera bags aimed at the distaff side and a trio of cameras that cover the gamut from advanced amateur to semipro.

Newsletter
Staff Nov 21, 2011 Published: Dec 01, 2011 0 comments
On The Cover
Are you thinking of turning pro? You should go for it, but not until you read this issue first. Through our exclusive interview with Chase Jarvis and our Twitter tips for photographers, you’ll see there is a lot more to marketing yourself than in the past. Business aside, we have breaking tech news: a new archival DVD called the M-Disc. We also have tests on the latest pro equipment to help take your photography to new levels. Our cover shot, by Lindsay Adler, shows what you can accomplish with Broncolor’s Senso lighting kit for example.

Picture This
Staff Jan 12, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2011 7 comments
Our Picture This! assignment this month was Handheld Pan, a shooting technique that involves a long shutter speed and some sort of motion while shooting on the part of the photographer. We generally do everything we can to keep the camera steady and make sure there is no photographer-induced motion in a shot, including using image stabilized lenses, often elaborate tripods and heads, and even mirror lockup. The assignment requested just the opposite—adding motion to a shot that might include following a subject in motion across a plane, jiggling the camera to make lights record as lines rather than points, and even moving the camera in a circular motion to completely abstract the color and form.
Talking Pictures
Staff Jan 27, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2011 4 comments
As collectors of 19th century American paintings, my wife and I are very familiar with the wonderful twilight paintings of Frederic Church, Albert Bierstadt, Jasper Cropsey, Samuel Colman, and Jervis McEntee. While touring Grand Teton National Park in the fall of 2009 we passed by the overlook to Lava Creek on numerous occasions and stopped to determine the possibility for a good panoramic shot. I took several over the course of a few days but was not satisfied with the lighting conditions.