Joe Farace

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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 11, 2013 Published: Sep 01, 2013 0 comments
Here are a few ABCs of web design to keep in mind when working on your site. A) Add something new each week. This is doubly important for blogs because search engines look for regular activity; the more and regular activity there is, the higher it will move the site in rankings when people look for photographers. B) Bigger is not necessarily better. Large file sizes cause a page to load slowly and, as I mentioned before in this column, the longer it takes, the more likely a person visiting the site will bail. Big file sizes also means it takes longer for a search engine spider to crawl your site. C) Colors should be simple, avoiding a strong graphic or photographic background. What works in print doesn’t always look good on a backlit monitor. A site’s focus should be on your photographs, not its design.<
Joe Farace Posted: Nov 01, 2010 0 comments

As studio lights have gotten bigger and shoe-mount flashes more sophisticated, on-location photographers increasingly have reached for speedlights to solve lighting problems.

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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 01, 2010 0 comments

“Happiness can be found, even in the darkest of times, if one only remembers to turn on the light.”—Albus Dumbledore in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Updating to Photoshop CS4 was a rude awakening. I’d put it off because the changes didn’t seem substantial enough but over time I finally realized it was a good idea, at least until I tried to make a...

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 01, 2008 0 comments

“The night we met I knew I needed you so…”—Ronnie Spector & The Ronettes

If you like having fun with distortion and soft focus you already know about Lensbabies, but did you know that, like the three bears—Cornelius, Alice, and Muffy—there are now three Lensbaby lenses and they are called Composer, Muse, and Control Freak? (I’ll let you figure...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

"I have lost friends, some by death...others through sheer inability to cross the street."--Virginia Woolf

Robert Waxman Camera in Denver made my first Kodak Photo CD on July 7, 1992. That's a long time ago in digital years, which are a lot like "dog years." Back then Photo CD was a simple, inexpensive way for photographers to...

Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 2011 3 comments

When it was launched in October 2007, the E-3 broke new ground. It wasn’t a me-too SLR; it carried the Four Thirds format into new directions that were uniquely Olympus.

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Joe Farace Posted: Apr 01, 2005 Published: Mar 22, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Joe Farace, All Rights Reserved

The Original Lensbaby is a flexible camera lens that creates an image that has an area of sharp--or not--focus that's surrounded by a graduated blur. This mostly plastic lens is available in different camera mounts and brings the "Holga look" (see What's a Holga Anyway? sidebar) to single...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jul 09, 2013 Published: Jun 01, 2013 1 comments
When creating their mirrorless camera system, Panasonic wisely, I think, chose the Micro Four Thirds format rather than designing an all-new proprietary lens mount. The system includes two dozen or so Lumix lenses, including conversion lenses, along with adapters for Leica R and M mount lenses, Four Thirds digital SLRs, plus the ability to use lenses from Olympus, Sigma, and Tamron. The Micro Four Thirds system is here to stay and the Lumix DMC-G5 seems a perfect way to jump on board.
Joe Farace Posted: Jan 24, 2013 Published: Dec 01, 2012 1 comments

The Pentax K-01 belongs to a class of cameras generally known as “mirrorless”—Pentax calls it a hybrid—that combine large LCD screens with interchangeable lenses and more often than not a retro look. Marc Newson, the Australian industrial designer who crafted the Pentax K-01, works in a style called biomorphism that uses smooth flowing lines, translucency, and an absence of sharp edges. The camera is available in black, white, or Newson’s signature yellow with the designer’s logo on the bottom.

Joe Farace Posted: Jul 11, 2013 Published: Jun 01, 2013 1 comments

Instead of trying to be just another me-too camera, the K-30 from Pentax Imaging is trying to be different, and that’s a good thing. First, there was the introduction of the K-01 mirrorless camera and now there’s the K-30 SLR, for when the going gets wet and not-so-wild. The rugged Pentax K-30 is designed for photographers who enjoy outdoor lifestyles and combines a weather- and dust-resistant compact body, HD video recording capabilities, and a glass prism optical finder with a 100 percent field of view, something most welcome in the small SLR category. To keep itself high and dry, the camera has 81 seals and is built to be cold resistant and function in temperatures as low as 14˚F, which is a number not all that uncommon here on Daisy Hill, Colorado, in the winter.

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