Joe Farace

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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

Lots of people don't know that Pentax built the first Japanese-made Single Lens Reflex (SLR) camera. In 1952 the Asahi Optical Company of Japan created the Pentax (PENTAprism refleX) line of cameras and were the first to incorporate a penta-prism viewfinder and reflex mirror system into a camera they called the Asahiflex I. This camera featured a cloth curtain focal plane...

Joe Farace Posted: Aug 01, 2007 0 comments

The Pentax K100D is an awesome camera for the price and works with all the 24 million Pentax lenses made since 1964. Now Pentax Imaging is "kicking it up a notch" with the K10D, a more serious, even professional, D-SLR as evidenced by its stainless-steel chassis. The camera is weather-resistant with 72 seals, including shutter release and all switches, levers, and...

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 01, 2009 4 comments

Beginning with the launch of the Asahiflex I in 1952, Pentax (PENTAprism refleX) was the first SLR that incorporated a penta-prism viewfinder and reflex mirror.

Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 2011 1 comments

Now I know how my erstwhile colleagues at our sister publication Motor Trend feel when they test drive a $1,770,000 Bugatti Veyron.

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Joe Farace Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

"I'm not sure blogs are necessarily the best place to get a pulse on anything. People want to blog for a variety of reasons, and that may or may not be representative." --Steve Ballmer

Like it or not, Mr. Ballmer, blogging is a fact of life in this millennium. I'm always surprised by how many photographers' websites also have blogs. It...

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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2003 0 comments

Travel Photography With A Big Difference
Glen Allison (www.glenallison.com) is a LA-based travel photographer whose imagery captures the...

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Joe Farace Posted: Aug 02, 2013 Published: Jun 01, 2013 0 comments
“Where ENIAC is equipped with 18,000 vacuum tubes and weighs 30 tons, computers in the future may have only 1,000 vacuum tubes and perhaps weigh 1.5 tons.”—Popular Mechanics, March 1949

The above quotation makes you wonder about the nature of predictions because a common fallacy is in believing that technology is always going to move in a straight line and not branch out to form a paradigm shift. Or sometimes people, as in the quoted magazine, just didn’t know what was going on in the rest of the world. Bell Labs’ John Bardeen, Walter Brattain, and William Shockley were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for research on semiconductors and discovery of the transistor effect in 1947. Yet even today vacuum tubes are not dead and there is a booming if small market in analog audio components. And in our neck of the woods, witness Harman’s announcement of building a factory to make 35mm film cassettes. It might just be too soon to start chiseling film’s tombstone—or not.

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Joe Farace Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.--Andrew Brown

Recently Adobe's CEO Bruce Chizen announced that all their applications would move online within 10 years. The same day I saw a headline that "Comcast Blocks Some Internet Traffic," referring to the nation's second largest...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

"Silver white winters that melt into springs."--Oscar Hammerstein II

The idea behind this story was to provide insight into the photo gear I own and use, all of which was purchased from Shutterbug advertisers. During the review process many different photographic products pass through my hands but contrary to what you may think they don't stay there...

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Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

"You haven't even touched your food."--Inga in Young Frankenstein

According to Metrocurean (http://amandamc.blogspot.com), a blog aimed at epicureans in the Nation's Capitol, it is OK to play with your food but taking pictures of it in restaurants is verboten. The story (posted in the...

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