Joe Farace

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 01, 2008 0 comments

“Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense.”
—The Buddha

Italian publisher FMR recently produced an art book called Michelangelo: La Dotta Mano which, I believe, translates into “You ‘da Man, Mike” or “The Wise Hand” for...

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Joe Farace Posted: Aug 08, 2011 Published: Jun 01, 2011 3 comments
I’m spending the next few days working with Tim Fiedler (www.dracophoto.com) on the latest incarnation of my how-to blog (www.joefaraceblogs.com). This new version features a WordPress (http://wordpress.org) structure and theme. WordPress originally started as a free blogging system but soon evolved into a full content management system, including access to thousands of plug-ins, widgets, and themes. In January, my blog was restructured to feature a different topic for each day and since this issue’s theme is Travel & Location Photography be sure to check in on Tuesday. There are subjects for the rest of the week, too, including Macro Monday, Landscape Wednesday, Automobile Thursday, and Portrait & Glamour Friday.
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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2009 16 comments

If there’s any secret about making great travel photographs it’s that using your camera has to be instinctive because when a photo opportunity presents itself you may only have a few seconds to get a shot.

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Joe Farace Posted: Aug 26, 2014 0 comments
The most important tip I would like to share about travel photography is never buy a new camera or lens before traveling to Bhutan or even Carhenge. The next most essential travel photography secret is that using your equipment has to be instinctive; when a photo op presents itself you may only have a few seconds to get a shot. There’s no time to think about what menu to use or how to turn on continuous AF, or what exposure mode you’re in. Using your camera has to be instinctive; you should see—or even anticipate—then click the shutter. It’ll make travel more fun, too.
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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

There are those situations when you can't (or don't want to) carry a tripod or there's just not enough space to set one up. That's when a monopod comes in handy. Monopods are the ideal camera support for nature photographers and backpackers, to who size and weight are important considerations. A monopod is especially useful when working with long lenses in...

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Joe Farace Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

"Only the mediocre are alwlays at their best."
--Jean Giraudoux

Two quotes this month: The first by Alan Kay was on my mind while replying to the editor of my book The Complete Guide to Digital Infrared Photography--I didn't choose that title. He asked: "If I want to emulate the look of color IR film is a plug-in or (digital)...

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 27, 2005 0 comments


For this retro portrait of Tia, I placed a Westcott Spiderlite
TD5 with five 23wfluoresce...

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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2005 4 comments

There's an old photographer's joke that goes: "If God invented light, then the devil invented fluorescent light." How times do change. With digital capture, fluorescent light can be your friend and I don't mean those long tubes hanging in lighting fixtures from the ceiling. I'm talking about a new breed of portrait lighting tools designed...

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 17, 2012 1 comments
Portrait lighting sources have 4 major characteristics: color, direction, quantity and quality. When working with any light source, from speedlights to moonlights, the best way to improve the quality of your lighting is with modification devices such as an umbrella or a lightbank. Each one has their own advantages and disadvantages. But no matter which one you chose, each device is governed by this important rule. The closer a light source is to the subject the softer it is; the further away the light source is, the harder it becomes.

Joe Farace Posted: Jul 01, 2004 Published: Jun 01, 2004 0 comments

Konica Minolta DiMAGE Xg Quick Look
· 3.2 Million effective pixels
· $299
· 1.6" LCD Monitor
· 12x Zoom

Further Inforamtion
KONICA MINOLTA DiMAGE Xg
...

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