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Howard Millard Posted: Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

Could your portraits be enhanced
by the mysterious, otherworldly glow of a black and white infrared (IR) effect?
In the past, pre-digital darkroom, the only way you could get the IR look was
shooting special IR film, quite a challenge to expose, process, and print correctly.
Working digitally you can avoid many of the pitfalls and gain much more control
in the bargain. Here's how to emulate that exotic infrared look digitally:

You can start with a scan of any color slide, print, or negative you've
shot with your film camera or, even easier, with a color file from your digital
camera. If you're starting with a print, negative, or slide, scan it in
RGB color mode. Once you've got the digital file, open it in Adobe Photoshop
CS (or some earlier versions) to follow the steps outlined here. You can also
achieve the effect with Adobe Elements 2 or other advanced image-editing programs,
but the names of some tools or dialog boxes may be slightly different. Always
work on a copy to preserve your original scan. In fact, with this technique,
it is a good idea to make two or three copies in order to try different settings
in search of the effect you like best. Just follow these steps and you'll
be on your way to easy IR.

I began with this original color file shot in Raw mode with a
Canon Digital Rebel 6-megapixel digital SLR with a Canon 18-55mm
lens at 55mm (equivalent to a 90mm lens in 35mm format). File
size: 18MB. (Model: Riley Messina.)


Filed under
Posted: Aug 29, 2006 0 comments

Look at the Future

By Ron Leach, Publisher

A leading software company and a respected market research/consulting firm
recently shared their vision on upcoming technological developments, market
trends, and anticipated consumer behavior that will influence the future of
digital photography. Corel Corporation's software solutionsa...

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Posted: Dec 25, 2007 0 comments

The work space consists of two main windows, with variations on each available.
The main work space (goldenhour) gives you a configurable split screen that
quickly shows the before and after of each filter chosen. You can choose from
color or black and white filman...

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Posted: Jul 28, 2009 0 comments

Seeing Pictures: Negative Space

What’s Not There

by Jim Zuckerman

The concept of negative space has to do with compositional balance. Negative space simply means an area of an image that is largely devoid of subject matter. In other words, it’s a blank area like the sky, an expanse of plaster, the surface of a...

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Posted: Jan 25, 2011 0 comments

Seeing Pictures: “Soft” Foregrounds

A High Tech Solution To A Visual Dilemma

by Jim Zuckerman

When foreground elements are soft, they are visually annoying. In nature, we want to see and appreciate all of the beautiful detail and texture in the subject. When the part of the composition that is closest to thec...

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Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

April 2008

the Cover

This month our focus is on black and white photography--from capture
and conversion to processing and printing. We show you how to use film and digital
technologies togetherto...

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Posted: Oct 27, 2009 0 comments

In-Camera Monochrome Contrast Control

Get Film & Filter Looks With Your Digital Camera

by George Schaub

Although the images you create are in color (RGB) you also have the ability to create black and white images in your digital camera using the Monochrome “creative” or “picture style” setting.

Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 26, 2011 0 comments

I was privileged to be able to photograph a champion Gypsy Vanner horse, Romeo, with a beautiful model in period costume. I chose late afternoon about an hour before sunset to take advantage of the spectacular backlighting on the blond mane, the tail, and the feathering around the feet. For this particular photo session, I wasn’t able to shoot Romeo in an open field, and the corral fence behind him (#1) bothered me at the time but there were no other options. I knew I wanted to separate my subjects from the background at a later point in time during post-processing, but what makes this breed of horse so beautiful—the long, flowing hair—is a nightmare to deal with in composite work.

Filed under
Howard Millard Posted: Jul 26, 2005 0 comments

original photo, shot in the studio with Paul C. Buff electronic
flash on Fujichrome Sensia slide film, is sharp throughout.
Model: Heidi McAllister.

Photos 2002, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

In ads, book covers and magazines,
you've seen pictures where part of the subject jumps out at you
because it's sharp, but most of the image is way out of focus. The
technique really directs your attention to the part of the subject that's
sharp, and it adds a contemporary flair and sense of style. Traditionally,
this effect was achieved by using extremely shallow depth of field with
a medium format or large view camera. Today, however, you can create it
digitally in a few minutes and apply it to any existing photo made with
any camera, or to any print that you can scan into your computer.

selected the area I want to keep sharp with the Elliptical
Marquee selection tool.

Remember, once you've drawn the selection, you can
reposition it by dragging inside the selected area. Next,
feather the selection.


Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Mar 27, 2007 0 comments

The Case for Center Weighted Metering

by George Schaub

While today's multi-pattern metering system found in most DSLRs are marvels
of technology, you'll notice that almost every DSLR also has other metering
pattern options. The two main options, with variants available on some cameras,
are center-weightedaver...

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Posted: Jul 29, 2008 0 comments

All Photos © 2008, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Filed under
Posted: Jan 26, 2010 0 comments

Industry Perspective

Can Photography Save the World?

by Ron Leach

Ten years ago PBS debuted a moving documentary entitled “American Photography: A
Century of Images.” The program traced photography’s profound influence upon life in
America, and I recall being particularly struck by thecamera&rsqu...

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Text and photography by Ron Leach Posted: Dec 27, 2005 0 comments

Classic portrait lighting isn't always necessary for capturing
interesting peoplepictures.

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Jun 26, 2007 0 comments


Courtesy of Sigma Corporation, All Rights Reserved

Filed under
Posted: Nov 25, 2008 0 comments

The Megapixel Madness Continues

by George Schaub

The recent surge on megapixel counts in all levels of digital cameras, from modest point and shoot all the way through advanced amateur and especially in pro cameras and backs, has users questioning the need for such massive files. Indeed, many have become concerned that their camera is nowpushing...


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