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Posted: Oct 26, 2010 0 comments

Seeing Shadows

“Negative” Space That Defines Content

by George Schaub

While there may be times when you want to open shadows to see the details “inside,” deep texture and detail-less shadows play an important role in defining the space in a photograph. Such shadows can also take on a character orl...

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Howard Millard Posted: Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

Could your portraits be enhanced
by the mysterious, otherworldly glow of a black and white infrared (IR) effect?
In the past, pre-digital darkroom, the only way you could get the IR look was
shooting special IR film, quite a challenge to expose, process, and print correctly.
Working digitally you can avoid many of the pitfalls and gain much more control
in the bargain. Here's how to emulate that exotic infrared look digitally:




You can start with a scan of any color slide, print, or negative you've
shot with your film camera or, even easier, with a color file from your digital
camera. If you're starting with a print, negative, or slide, scan it in
RGB color mode. Once you've got the digital file, open it in Adobe Photoshop
CS (or some earlier versions) to follow the steps outlined here. You can also
achieve the effect with Adobe Elements 2 or other advanced image-editing programs,
but the names of some tools or dialog boxes may be slightly different. Always
work on a copy to preserve your original scan. In fact, with this technique,
it is a good idea to make two or three copies in order to try different settings
in search of the effect you like best. Just follow these steps and you'll
be on your way to easy IR.

1.
I began with this original color file shot in Raw mode with a
Canon Digital Rebel 6-megapixel digital SLR with a Canon 18-55mm
lens at 55mm (equivalent to a 90mm lens in 35mm format). File
size: 18MB. (Model: Riley Messina.)

...

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Posted: Nov 27, 2007 0 comments

17-70mm
Filed under
Posted: Jun 30, 2009 2 comments

Equivalent Exposure

by George Schaub

Now we come to how ISO, aperture, and shutter speed relate to one another. They exist to balance the amount of light in the scene with the recording made by the sensor and ultimately made into an image file on the memory card. Your goal is to record the scene with as true and balanced a color and lightnessof...

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Posted: Feb 01, 2011 0 comments

February 2011

On The Cover
This month we have exclusive reports from photokina, the worldwide photo trade show. While we couldn’t cover all of the new products and innovations displayed at photokina, we did bring you the 2011 product highlights in cameras, lenses, lighting, tripods, accessories, and bags. Plus, we take a look atwhat&rsqu...

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 27, 2005 0 comments

The
Sprint PCS Samsung Multimedia Phone MM-A800



Much ado has been made of late of how camera phones will gut the lower-end digicam
market and how everyone will dump their 1-3MP digicams for these amazing multimedia
products. Having shot with a sub 1-megapixel phone a year back I shrugged and
moved on, deciding it was a fun toy that some might find useful but that image
quality was poor, even when compared with the lowliest of blister-pack dedicated
cameras. Word has gotten around that new, higher-megapixel phonecams are coming,
with 7 MP being the figure touted on one model available now overseas. In addition,
we just got word that Kodak is finally going to release their EasyShare One,
subject of a press conference last January, which is said to be a camera first
and then a web or phone connecting pictuire sender second. With all that in
mind I was intrigued by the new Samsung 2MP camphone sent to us by the folks
at Sprint, one that links up with Sprint's PCS Picture mail service.

...

Filed under
Posted: Dec 12, 2006 0 comments

January
2007

On
the Cover


This month we're taking you directly to the show floor of photokina, the
giant photo and imaging show held in Cologne, Germany, every two years. As you'll
see,the...

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Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

April 2008

On
the Cover

This month our focus is on black and white photography--from capture
and conversion to processing and printing. We show you how to use film and digital
technologies togetherto...

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Posted: Oct 27, 2009 0 comments

In-Camera Monochrome Contrast Control

Get Film & Filter Looks With Your Digital Camera

by George Schaub

Although the images you create are in color (RGB) you also have the ability to create black and white images in your digital camera using the Monochrome “creative” or “picture style” setting.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 26, 2011 1 comments

I was privileged to be able to photograph a champion Gypsy Vanner horse, Romeo, with a beautiful model in period costume. I chose late afternoon about an hour before sunset to take advantage of the spectacular backlighting on the blond mane, the tail, and the feathering around the feet. For this particular photo session, I wasn’t able to shoot Romeo in an open field, and the corral fence behind him (#1) bothered me at the time but there were no other options. I knew I wanted to separate my subjects from the background at a later point in time during post-processing, but what makes this breed of horse so beautiful—the long, flowing hair—is a nightmare to deal with in composite work.

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Howard Millard Posted: Jul 26, 2005 0 comments


The
original photo, shot in the studio with Paul C. Buff electronic
flash on Fujichrome Sensia slide film, is sharp throughout.
Model: Heidi McAllister.

Photos 2002, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

In ads, book covers and magazines,
you've seen pictures where part of the subject jumps out at you
because it's sharp, but most of the image is way out of focus. The
technique really directs your attention to the part of the subject that's
sharp, and it adds a contemporary flair and sense of style. Traditionally,
this effect was achieved by using extremely shallow depth of field with
a medium format or large view camera. Today, however, you can create it
digitally in a few minutes and apply it to any existing photo made with
any camera, or to any print that you can scan into your computer.



I
selected the area I want to keep sharp with the Elliptical
Marquee selection tool.

Remember, once you've drawn the selection, you can
reposition it by dragging inside the selected area. Next,
feather the selection.

...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 27, 2007 0 comments

The Case for Center Weighted Metering

by George Schaub

While today's multi-pattern metering system found in most DSLRs are marvels
of technology, you'll notice that almost every DSLR also has other metering
pattern options. The two main options, with variants available on some cameras,
are center-weightedaver...

Filed under
Posted: Jul 29, 2008 0 comments

All Photos © 2008, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Filed under
Posted: Jan 26, 2010 0 comments

Industry Perspective

Can Photography Save the World?

by Ron Leach

Ten years ago PBS debuted a moving documentary entitled “American Photography: A
Century of Images.” The program traced photography’s profound influence upon life in
America, and I recall being particularly struck by thecamera&rsqu...

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Text and photography by Ron Leach Posted: Dec 27, 2005 0 comments


Classic portrait lighting isn't always necessary for capturing
interesting peoplepictures.

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