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Posted: Aug 26, 2008 0 comments

Lens Tech Update



Is This the World's Longest Range Zoom?

by George Schaub

Not
so far back photographers were leery of zoom lenses that exceeded a 3x focal
length ratio; in other words, say you started at 70mm, then a 210mm outer range
would be considered "safe." (Indeed even further backphotograph...

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Posted: Mar 30, 2010 1 comments

Macro Vs. Macro Zoom

Know The Difference

by Jon Sienkiewicz

Every hobby has its own language, and photography is no different. It can take a while to learn all of the unintuitive abbreviations, unnatural acronyms, and shifting definitions. The term “shifting definition” refers to words like“automatic&rdq...

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Posted: Nov 30, 2010 0 comments

Metering Patterns: Center-Weighted Averaging

A Quick Lesson On An Often Ignored Metering Pattern

by George Schaub

When light is directional—not over the shoulder and not the same brightness throughout the frame—try center-weighted averaging metering. The key is to aim the camera at an area that incorporatesthe...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 29, 2006 0 comments

Black and White Imaging: Ilford's Perspective

by George Schaub

Given that we all have seen a shrinking in silver-based materials in general
in the last year, and in light of Kodak exiting the black and white paper business,
and Agfa leaving the black and white (and all photo) business altogether, we
were all leftwo...

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Posted: Dec 30, 2008 0 comments

Digital SLRs on the Upswing

by Ron Leach

A comprehensive new study from InfoTrends indicates that while the digital camera market is reaching a “mature stage” in it’s lifecycle, digital SLRs have emerged as an area of rapid growth within the industry while point-and-shoot cameras are heading toward commodity status withconstant...

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Posted: Jul 27, 2010 0 comments

Super High Contrast And “Tripod-Less” HDR

High-Speed Brackets

by George Schaub

HDR stands for “High Dynamic Range”, which means that there are times when one exposure can not possibly capture the very wide range of light values in a scene. The eye compensates for high contrast by opening andclosing...

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Posted: Feb 22, 2011 0 comments

Industry Perspective

The Passing of Photographer Charles Brittin

by Ron Leach

Relatively unknown outside of Los Angeles for most of his career, Charles Brittin was an important documentary photographer known for his political activism. In commemorating Brittin’s recent passing Andrew Perchuk, Deputy Director of the GettyR...

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Howard Millard Posted: Sep 27, 2005 0 comments


To
achieve the eerie, glowing effect of infrared black and
white film, I applied several techniques in Adobe Photoshop.

Photos © 2001, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

Are you attracted to the
mysterious, otherworldly glow of black and white infrared film? But
you've heard that it's a bit of a hassle to shoot and print.
Well, here's how to emulate that exotic infrared (IR) look digitally
starting with any color original.



Why not shoot IR film to begin with? Kodak High Speed Infrared film
is a challenge. First, to avoid fogging, it should be stored in the
refrigerator and must be loaded and unloaded in the darkroom or a changing
bag. Then, for the best effect, you must shoot with a deep red or opaque
filter over your lens. Once you've focused, you must re-focus
the lens manually to the infrared focus point. Since your camera meter
doesn't measure IR light, it's advisable to bracket exposures
widely. In the field, you must load and reload your camera in a light-tight
changing bag. After the film has been processed, the negatives are extremely
contrasty and often require extensive dodging and burning to get a good
print.



I
started with this original color 35mm slide shot on Fuji Sensia
II and scanned it on a Polaroid Sprintscan 35 Plus scanner
at 2700dpi for a 26MB file.

...

Filed under
Ron Eggers Posted: Dec 26, 2006 0 comments


The Topaz A2, which powers the Ringflash, is a full-size power pack
with 1600 ws output that features symmetrical/asymmetricalp...

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Posted: Sep 20, 2007 0 comments

Industry Perspective

Turning Your Hobby Into Cash

By Ron Leach

While all Shutterbug readers are serious about imaging, some consider photography
a career while others shoot for the pure pleasure of the creative process. We
regularly hear from a third type of photographer: photo enthusiasts whodon&...

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Posted: Apr 28, 2009 0 comments

Industry Perspective

The Passing of a Legend

by Ron Leach

America lost a national treasure with the recent passing of celebrated New York street photographer Helen Levitt. Born on August 31, 1913 of Russian-Jewish immigrants, Levitt died peacefully in her sleep on March 29 at the age of 95.

After dropping...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

It's 10PM: Do You Know Where Your Pixels Are?

...

Filed under
Posted: Feb 27, 2007 1 comments

Printing Trends

by Ron Leach

Back in the "old days" of film, most photographers concentrated
on image capture, with "output" being limited to the relatively
few pros and enthusiasts with access to a darkroom. Things are a bit different
in today's digital world, with affordable inkjetprinters...

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Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

February
2008

On
the Cover

This month our focus is on black and white photography--from capture
and conversion to processing and printing. We show you how to use film and digital
technologi...

Filed under
Posted: Aug 25, 2009 1 comments

The Mysteries Of Long Exposure

Expand Your Image Imagination

by Art Rosch

The human eye sees light in the moment. Film or sensors accumulate light through an entire exposure, as if it were a memory. Photons continue making impressions wherever they land on the sensor or film. Moving objects leave a distended, time-lapsei...

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