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Newsletter
Howard Millard Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

Photos
© 2003, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

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Newsletter
George Schaub Sep 27, 2005 0 comments

The
Sprint PCS Samsung Multimedia Phone MM-A800



Much ado has been made of late of how camera phones will gut the lower-end digicam
market and how everyone will dump their 1-3MP digicams for these amazing multimedia
products. Having shot with a sub 1-megapixel phone a year back I shrugged and
moved on, deciding it was a fun toy that some might find useful but that image
quality was poor, even when compared with the lowliest of blister-pack dedicated
cameras. Word has gotten around that new, higher-megapixel phonecams are coming,
with 7 MP being the figure touted on one model available now overseas. In addition,
we just got word that Kodak is finally going to release their EasyShare One,
subject of a press conference last January, which is said to be a camera first
and then a web or phone connecting pictuire sender second. With all that in
mind I was intrigued by the new Samsung 2MP camphone sent to us by the folks
at Sprint, one that links up with Sprint's PCS Picture mail service.

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Newsletter
Howard Millard Jun 07, 2005 0 comments


#1. Starting with an original single image photo shot
in the studio, I selected the subject with the Magic Wand
tool. (Model: Tanya Perez.)

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Newsletter
George Schaub Mar 29, 2005 0 comments

One of the reasons that many people are getting into making prints at home
these days is that inkjet prints are simpler to make and more permanent than,
in many cases, photographic prints (dye based projection, that is.) With recent
advances in ink and paper technology from companies such as Epson and HP we
now see the potential, given proper storage, of digital prints lasting more
than 100 years. Even snapshot size prints, according to Wilhelm Research, from
portable printers like the popular and relatively diminutive PictureMate from
Epson can last three generations or more. And most of the newer printers don't
even require the intermediary of the computer to make very good looking prints.

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Newsletter
Shutterbug Staff Jul 26, 2005 0 comments

Corel Corporation has kicked off the "Summer of Painter" with two announcements
regarding Corel Painter IX. The Corel Painter IX 9.1 update is now available as
a free download for all Painter IX customers. The update provides customers with
new features and enhancements including:



Dual Monitor Support for Windows Customers running Windows 2000 and Windows XP
can now also experience the same level of dual monitor support enjoyed by Mac
OS X customers. Palettes, toolbars, and the toolbox can now be moved outside the
application window and dialog boxes appear on the same monitor as the active canvas.




New Art Pen Brushes Following the introduction of the Corel Painter IX Art Pen
Brush Pack this spring, Corel has introduced five additional brushes to take advantage
of the powerful realism and control of the Wacom 6D Art Pen. Customers who download
the 9.1 update will receive 10 brushes in total, which include the five brushes
previously introduced in the Art Pen Brush Pack.



Enhanced Dab Type Support for 'Rotation' Expression In addition to adding new
brushes to take advantage of the Wacom 6D Art Pen, Corel Painter IX 9.1 offers
rotation expression with the following Dab types: Circular, Captured Dab, Artists'
Oils, Camel Hair, Flat, Liquid Ink Camel Hair, Liquid Ink Flat, Watercolor Camel
Hair, Watercolor Flat, Palette Knife, Liquid Ink Palette Knife, and Watercolor
Palette Knife.



Enhanced Support for Mac OS X Tiger Corel Painter IX 9.1 now provides even better
overall performance when running on Tiger. This enhancement complements the Corel
Painter IX Spotlight plugin introduced earlier this spring that enables customers
to take full advantage of Tiger's advanced searching capabilities with their Painter
files.



To download the Corel Painter IX 9.1 update and to access a full list of included
enhancements, please visit www.corel.com/painterix/91update.



Corel has also introduced the Corel Painter Open Upgrade Program for customers
in North America and the United Kingdom. Until August 31, 2005, the Corel Painter
IX upgrade policy has been broadened to include any graphics or imaging software
package from the following companies: Adobe, Macromedia, ACD Systems, Corel (including
Corel Painter Classic, Painter Essentials, and any previous version of Painter),
Microsoft, and Apple. For a limited time, Corel Painter IX is available through
Corel and participating resellers at the upgrade suggested retail price of $229
a savings of $200 off the full suggested retail price of $429. Resellers may sell
for less. For more details, please visit www.corel.com/painter/openupgrade.
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Newsletter
Jon Canfield Aug 30, 2005 0 comments

As the price of wide format photo printers like the ones offered by Epson,
Canon, and HP continues to come down, more and more digital photo enthusiasts
are adding them to their digital darkrooms. For less than $400, you can now
print photo quality 11x14" images (actually, up to 13x19), saving money
and time without sending these prints out to a photo lab.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Aug 30, 2005 0 comments

The promise of digital imaging is that you can get one-touch corrections on
your photographs, making it easy to create the best images you can from every
picture you take. The phrase: "I won't worry about white balance,
exposure or contrast, etc....I'll fix it in Photoshop" is commonly
heard, but it isn't always the best course. If you shoot in Raw mode you
can fix anything, even exposure compensation, later, but not everyone wants
to go through the steps of working with Raw converters and all those sliders
and options. That's where the supposed magic of "auto" fixes
come into play, and yes, there are times when it can do wonders. Today, cameras
even have auto red-eye fix and amazing adjustments for backlighting problems.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Dec 07, 2004 0 comments

Every month in Shutterbug we publish photographs from readers based on an assignment
published in a previous month's issue. We get hundreds of photographs
from readers all around the world and unfortunately we are limited to publishing
just a small fraction of the work we receive. We've had topics including
"Black and White in Color", "Silhouettes" and "Historical
Reenactments." Our purpose in creating this section in the magazine is
to create a visual forum for readers and to challenge them to fulfill assignments.
It's always a delight to open the packages we receive. I know the thrill
I got when my fist photo was published, and my hope is that the same excitement
is shared by those whose images we select to publish each month.

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Newsletter
George Schaub Nov 09, 2004 0 comments

While you can choose enhanced color saturation when using your digital camera
via the Menu, this choice generally adds saturation to all colors at once. This
might work fine for some subjects, but there are many ways to "juice up"
selective colors later in the software. We'll work with two controls here,
Hue/Saturation and Selective Color, both used as Adjustment Layers.


1

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Newsletter
Peter K. Burian Jun 21, 2005 0 comments

In
certain lighting conditions, images can exhibit a strong
overall "color cast" or tint, as in this
image, made near sunset on a hazy day with a high air
pollution level. (Auto white balance.)

Photos © 2003, Peter K. Burian, All Rights Reserved

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Newsletter
Jack Warren Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Henry Diltz is a photographer who made his living first as musician with Modern
Folk Quartet (MFQ), then as a trusted friend and photographer of many successful
groups from that time forward. The Lovin Spoon Full, The Mama's and Papa's,
Crosby Stills and Nash, The Doors and many more. He bought his first camera
a Kodak "Pony", while on tour with his group. They had a photo shoot
out with slide film and when they got home they shared them with each other
in a slide show. That was enough to hook Henry on photography forever.



Photos © Henry Diltz, All Rights Reserved

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Newsletter
George Schaub May 10, 2005 0 comments

Backlight has been bedeviling photographers for years, particularly in landscape
pictures and those where you want to take a shot but simply showed up at your
location at the wrong time of day. Backlight in and of itself is not the problem;
it's how your meter behaves and how you make the reading that creates
it. Simply put, when the subject falls within its own shadow because the brightest
illumination is behind it the meter can be overwhelmed by the illumination and
"fooled" into thinking it has more light for the exposure than the
main subject dictates.

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Newsletter
Jack Warren Mar 29, 2005 0 comments

Kay Levie has loved photography since she was old enough to hold a camera.
She says that was a long time ago. Her first camera was a Kodak Brownie Box
Camera. She stated it was very limiting to use and challenging to capture images
it wasn't made to capture - like cats jumping in the air or horses running.
It taught her a lot about timing, which is what sports photography is all about.

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Newsletter
Jon Canfield Aug 30, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Jon Canfield, All Rights Reserved

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Newsletter
George Schaub May 24, 2005 0 comments

While the usual photographic rules, such as using shutter speed to portray motion
(slow to blur, fast to freeze) and using focal length, aperture and camera-to-subject
distance to create a certain depth of field apply to both film and digital photography,
digital offers some intriguing options for making camera settings. In some cases
these settings relate to film photography settings, or choosing a specific film
for its "personality", but with digital you can alter these settings
on every frame you shoot and not be restricted to the attributes of a particular
film you might have loaded in the camera.

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