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Jack Warren Posted: Mar 29, 2005 0 comments

Kay Levie has loved photography since she was old enough to hold a camera.
She says that was a long time ago. Her first camera was a Kodak Brownie Box
Camera. She stated it was very limiting to use and challenging to capture images
it wasn't made to capture - like cats jumping in the air or horses running.
It taught her a lot about timing, which is what sports photography is all about.

...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 26, 2005 0 comments

If you have Photoshop Elements or the full version of Photoshop
you can also use a tool called "Save for Web" to resize your images.
(Note that other programs might also have this feature under a different name.)
This is an automated way to get your images the right size for sharing. To get
to this toolbox just go to File>Save for Web, with the image already open
on your desktop.

...

Howard Millard Posted: Jan 31, 2006 0 comments


The fast, streamlined Minolta DiMAGE Scan Elite 5400 scans...

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Posted: Sep 25, 2007 0 comments

All Photos © George Schaub, All RIghts Reserved

This first shot wasmad...

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Posted: Dec 28, 2010 0 comments

Seeing Pictures: Lighting’s Influence On Composition

Directional Light And Shaping Shadows

by Jim Zuckerman

Lighting can have a unique effect on composition. By highlighting certain areas of a picture with front lighting, sidelighting, or backlighting, the play of light and shadow can create compelling graphicdesig...

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Posted: Jul 28, 2009 0 comments

Seeing Pictures: Negative Space

What’s Not There

by Jim Zuckerman

The concept of negative space has to do with compositional balance. Negative space simply means an area of an image that is largely devoid of subject matter. In other words, it’s a blank area like the sky, an expanse of plaster, the surface of a...

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Posted: Jan 25, 2011 0 comments

Seeing Pictures: Negative Space

What’s Not There

by Jim Zuckerman

The concept of negative space has to do with compositional balance. Negative space simply means an area of an image that is largely devoid of subject matter. In other words, it’s a blank area like the sky, an expanse of plaster, the surface of a...

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Posted: Jan 25, 2011 0 comments

Seeing Pictures: “Soft” Foregrounds

A High Tech Solution To A Visual Dilemma

by Jim Zuckerman

When foreground elements are soft, they are visually annoying. In nature, we want to see and appreciate all of the beautiful detail and texture in the subject. When the part of the composition that is closest to thec...

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Posted: Oct 26, 2010 0 comments

Seeing Shadows

“Negative” Space That Defines Content

by George Schaub

While there may be times when you want to open shadows to see the details “inside,” deep texture and detail-less shadows play an important role in defining the space in a photograph. Such shadows can also take on a character orl...

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George Schaub Posted: May 15, 2012 10 comments
Here are some suggestions for self-assignments that can aid you in getting a good handle on mastering your camera. Give each technique a full day then review the images, along with the EXIF data. As you complete these self-assignments you’ll start to make great photos every time you pick up the camera.
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Posted: Sep 29, 2009 0 comments

Self-Publish Your Photo Book

A Great Way To Show And Share Your Images

by Joe Farace

Most photographers dream of accomplishing two things in the publishing world: The first is having their work featured in a national publication such as Shutterbug, National Geographic, or maybe Playboy and the second is showcasing theirph...

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Moose Peterson Posted: Aug 16, 2012 0 comments
Aviation photography is on the rise, literally and figuratively. There are many reasons for this, from the ease and small expense of getting involved to the excitement and subject matter. I think it’s also because it’s a way we can all get in touch with our own history.
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Moose Peterson Posted: Jun 13, 2013 1 comments
Filing the frame with the critter isn’t required for great wildlife photography. Reflecting on how I first slanted my wildlife photography in this direction, it has its roots in the first lens I had to shoot wildlife. I started with a Vivitar 400mm f/5.6 on an old Minolta that was soon replaced with a Nikon 400mm f/5.6 on an F2. That 400mm was my main lens for a long time and it taught me lessons about wildlife photography that I still depend on to this day.
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Posted: Sep 01, 2006 0 comments

September
2006

On the
Cover


How effective are the latest camera-shake compensating systems? Wonder no more
as we tell all in Peter K. Burian's in-depth Anti-Shake camera shootout
on page 80. New...

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Staff Posted: Aug 16, 2012 Published: Sep 01, 2012 0 comments
On The Cover
This month’s issue focuses on lighting, with reports on gear, techniques, and a comprehensive roundup on the wide variety of lighting equipment available to photographers today. We also have a lab report on the exciting Fujifilm X-Pro1 and special book excerpts from two of the leading lighting/software practitioners today, Kevin Kubota and Scott Kelby. Please note that with this issue our Workshop and Events listings have gone online at www.shutterbug.com.

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