Newsletter
Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Newsletter
May 29, 2008 0 comments

The compact Sigma DP1 has a single focal length lens, sports a "large"
(for compacts) sensor from Foveon and has many controls...
Newsletter
Aug 28, 2007 0 comments

The lens is what we are currently calling a "dual-platform" optic,
offering full coverage for 35mm cameras and full-frame D-SLRs, and of course
whatever multiplication factor your sensor imposes on the focal length in your
D-SLR. Included is an HSM (motor) which in all cases was silent and swift throughout...

Newsletter
Chuck Gloman Aug 19, 2013 0 comments
Lighting fair-skinned subjects can be a challenge, but when working outdoors or indoors, controlling the flash, managing external illumination or simply shading the areas you don’t want highlighted can yield great results. Here are some tips on lighting that also includes groups where skin tone varies. As we’ll see, fair-skinned people have a beauty all their own that can easily be brought out in correctly exposed portraits. Play around with the color temperature and see what can be done with a little extra warmth or coolness.
Newsletter
Oct 27, 2009 0 comments

Slide Shows That Shine

Digital Makes It A Whole New Ball Game

by Jon Canfield

Creating slide shows used to be a time consuming task—getting the slides in the right order, making sure nothing was backwards or upside down in the slide tray (and not dropping the tray!), and setting up the screen and projector. And,let&...

Newsletter
Chuck Gloman Jun 15, 2012 0 comments
Sometimes the lighting in your environment is too strong, whether daylight or artificial, and you need to soften it slightly—that’s where diffusion comes into play. In the following examples, we’ll look at how diffusion can soften “direct” light.

Diffusion Disc
Ashleen is using a collapsible diffuser (26” Flexfill) to block the sunlight from falling on Anne Marie (#1). The semi-translucent fabric prevents the sun from falling on the subject, which can be seen by the shadow cast on Anne Marie. If we look at a medium close-up of Anne Marie we can see that the sunlight is filtered on her face casting an even, pleasant illumination (#2). Using this method is great if you want a one to one lighting ratio outdoors by just shading the sunlight falling on your subject. This method usually requires a helpful assistant to hold the diffuser, although some folks use a light stand and a C clamp to good advantage.
Nikon D700, Nikkor 24–120mm lens, f/9, 1/250th, ISO 250, daylight balanced 5600K.

Newsletter
Chuck Gloman Apr 26, 2011 0 comments

Lighting portrait subjects with different hair and skin color can be a challenge, especially when you are using a dark background. With a little time spent adjusting the color temperature and placement of your lights, you won’t have to rely on color correcting the images later. No lighting challenge is too extreme if you break it down into a few simple steps. Do you want hair lighter or darker; do you want to complement or contrast the skin tone; and what is the overall “look” you desire—warm or cold? By answering these questions, you will be able to determine which color temperature of light you need to create the mood for the image. Again, don’t just set the camera on auto white balance. Set your daylight or tungsten balance lights accordingly and manually adjust the camera’s color temperature—you’ll be glad you did.

Newsletter
Ron Leach Oct 22, 2013 3 comments
I was recently reading about American documentary photographer and photojournalist Dorothea Lange and was reminded of one of my favorite quotes, in which she said “The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.” Afterward, I thought it might be fun to take a look at what other luminaries have said about our craft.
Newsletter
Jim Zuckerman Nov 16, 2011 2 comments
One of the ways to draw attention to a subject is to find—or set up—brightly colored objects in an environment of a muted or earth-toned background. The eye is immediately drawn to color, and this is a poignant way to make a powerful and dynamic visual statement.
Newsletter
May 26, 2009 0 comments

Commentary

Spring Cleaning: Some News Flashes from the Past

by George Schaub

The rush of events in the past few years has left us all fairly breathless, what with the pace of change wrought by digital. As product trumps product, and new operating systems and formats rush to grab our attention, older systems and gearquick...

Newsletter, Pro Techniques
Moose Peterson Jun 13, 2013 1 comments
Some of the best photography is in the worst weather!” I’ve been saying that for decades and it comes from coming in from the cold, soaking wet and thrilled to death with the images I captured. The drama in the light, clouds and the response to it by nature is a once-in-a-lifetime spectacle you just can’t duplicate. In order to see it and photograph it, you have to get out in it and be able to work. And that’s where the challenge lies.
Newsletter
Howard Millard May 31, 2011 9 comments

In this article I’ll show you how to add dramatic movement to your images, as well as rich color and strong graphic design to create a striking impression. This is a trick you can do in Photoshop CS2, CS3, CS4 and CS5.

Newsletter
Jim Zuckerman Dec 15, 2011 0 comments
Shooting in a studio intimidates a lot of photographers, but the truth is it’s not hard at all. There are a few basic lighting configurations to learn, and with the immediate feedback from the LCD monitor on the back of the camera, you can see immediately if you have the lighting, the pose, and the expression you want. In addition, you don’t need a huge space and it’s not necessary to spend thousands of dollars on lighting equipment. You can even set up a mini-studio with a $10 photoflood and a background with a white wall or a piece of black fabric.
Newsletter
Oct 30, 2007 0 comments

Sundance Photographic Workshop students aiming for great shots at the
Cowboy Poetry Gathering and Buckaroo Fair




Students at the November 8-12 Sundance Photographic Workshop will have a unique
opportunity to capture performers backstage at the 2007 Cowboy Poetry Gathering
and Buckaroo Fair in Heber City, Utah. The popular event--billed...

Newsletter
Jul 27, 2010 0 comments

Super High Contrast And “Tripod-Less” HDR

High-Speed Brackets

by George Schaub

HDR stands for “High Dynamic Range”, which means that there are times when one exposure can not possibly capture the very wide range of light values in a scene. The eye compensates for high contrast by opening andclosing...

Newsletter
Stan Trzoniec Oct 18, 2012 0 comments

In all my years of shooting in the field, I have yet to meet a photographer who did not like the look, isolation qualities or the sharpness modern telephoto lenses offer.

When it comes to possibilities, they seem endless. Wildlife is at the top of the list for many, perhaps to focus in on that bright cardinal outside your window or to record that special wolf pack in Yellowstone. Whatever your subject, a long telephoto will bring it in closer, sharper and with more detail than you’ve ever experienced before. Buying a telephoto lens might mean spending as much or more than the camera in your hands right now, so knowing what to get, and what it will get you, is an important part of making any purchasing decision. With that in mind, here’s a number of frequently asked questions on the subject of telephotos.