Digital Darkroom

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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 2001 0 comments

One of the reasons purists often refer to black and white prints as "monochrome" is that it's a much more precise term that also covers prints made in sepia and other tones. One of the advantages of working with monochromatic digital...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Feb 01, 2000 0 comments

To photographers black and white has an historic significance, for many an aesthetic advantage, and it is a unique way to photograph. Distinguished altogether from color by different films, papers, and processes. When photography is digitized, black and...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Software Used: Photoshop Elements 2

Time: 3 Minutes

Degree Of Difficulty: Moderate

When you make candid portraits you don't always have the time or the disposition to use aperture settings for a shallow depth of field (where the subject...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

It seems to me that if a photo enthusiast spends $1000 for a digital camera it is a serious investment that carries an expectation of getting high-quality photographic print results. However, all digital cameras, even the more expensive digital SLRs, come out of the box set to the maker's default mode to save images in JPEG format. This, however, only reproduces a fraction...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments

One of the most frustrating aspects of the digital darkroom is getting prints that closely resemble the images that we see on a computer monitor. Are your own prints as impressive as the images in the electronic display? Are they "clean," or do...

David B. Brooks Posted: Mar 01, 1999 0 comments

For all of you still not into computers, some of digital photography's many advantages are available without one. Although I had some doubts coming into what I am about to propose: to use a digital camera and then print directly from it without a computer in between; I can assure you that...

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Howard Millard Posted: Mar 01, 2008 1 comments

Remember those bright, colorful pop art prints created in the 1960s by silkscreen artists like Andy Warhol? In design magazines and ads recently, I've noticed that this style is enjoying a resurgence, thanks to its bold, flat colors, strong outlines, and dramatic impact. Perhaps you'd like to try it, either as a personal project to expand your technical bag of tricks...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Sep 01, 1999 0 comments

Many photographs will have a white sky because the contrast range of the film was not great enough to capture the much brighter sky and show its blue color. This is especially true when shooting color negative film. Slide film--with its greater tone...

Andrea Keister Posted: Mar 01, 2008 2 comments

When our resident digital guru's Digital Darkroom Resource CD appeared in 2003 it debuted to much fanfare. The first volume included 11 chapters; shortly thereafter, Brooks released a second volume containing 16 chapters. He's now outdone himself with a new, third volume that contains 26 chapters, totaling 318 pages in PDF format plus a folder of images for print test...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 01, 2001 0 comments

While Kodak's Photo CD process was originally announced in 1990, it wasn't until the summer of 1992 that a photo lab in my area offered the service. The original concept behind Photo CD was at once simple and complex. The...

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Phillip Andrews Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

For most photographers being able to switch from color to black and white with a few simple mouse clicks is one of the most powerful aspects of digital imaging. With digital you no longer need to pick color or black and white before taking the photo, as was the case when film was king. Now after color capture the decision to convert to monochrome can be made easily at the...

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Joe Farace Posted: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments

Editor's Note: This month starts a new column here at eDigitalPhoto from Joe Farace. Loyal readers of the magazine will know that Joe has been doing the Buzzwords here each month, and...

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 01, 2004 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Joe Farace, All Rights Reserved

"C'mon Honey, let's go make some noise."--The Bangles

Dear Diary: All digital cameras add noise to images. Like film grain, it's worse at high ISOs and is more noticeable in areas of uniform color, such as skies and shadows. Since noise can be objectionable...

Paul Mozell Posted: Sep 01, 2004 2 comments

Very few people would dare to ask this question, "Is digital better than film?" just a few years ago when the only cameras that could produce a digital file with qualities that approached film's capabilities cost in the neighborhood
...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2007 0 comments

One of the easiest ways to improve your images is to use lens filters, but like so much in the photo world, life is rarely that simple.

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