Digital Darkroom
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Digital Darkroom
David B. Brooks Sep 01, 2004 0 comments

Unlike film cameras, digital does not capture a likeness of the subject on a "physical artifact," like a film negative or slide. A digital camera just gathers information that describes what the lens and sensor...

Digital Darkroom
Uwe Steinmueller Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

While most digital photographers are familiar with JPEG and TIFF formats, the latest format to come down the pike for digital cameras, known as "raw," as it deals with the raw information right from the sensor, is something fairly new. Simply stated: to gain maximum image quality, you...

Digital Darkroom
David B. Brooks Sep 01, 2000 0 comments

The following step by step procedures and instructions are intended to assist you in obtaining the best possible film scans based on one basic principle: Every film image is unique. Therefore, the specific parameters of adjustment for...

Digital Darkroom
Joe Farace Jun 01, 1999 0 comments

After desktop printers, one of the most popular digital imaging products that Shutterbug readers ask me about is scanners. Typically, these aspiring digital imagers want to get started digitizing the slides and negative they've been shooting for many...

Digital Darkroom
Joe Farace Mar 01, 2000 0 comments

Service bureau is a term left over from the bad old days when few people could actually afford to own a computer. Instead, many of us had to take our data--usually in punched card form--to companies who, for a fee, would process the data using their large...

Digital Darkroom
Joe Farace Dec 01, 2003 0 comments

A few years ago I sold all my traditional darkroom equipment, lock, stock, and tongs. After sitting untouched in my new home's basement for several years, I decided it all had to go. I loaded enlarger, lenses, carriers, and trays into my car, and took them to a local photo show and sold...

Digital Darkroom
Jon Canfield Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

One of the most frequent questions I'm asked is about the proper, or "best," way to sharpen images for printing or web use. Almost everyone has struggled with getting this right. Software has improved greatly over the past couple of years, both within Adobe's Photoshop, which recently added the Smart Sharpen filter, and with third-party tools like...

Digital Darkroom
Howard Millard Sep 01, 2007 2 comments

No matter how careful you are, soft happens. Your subject, whether a femme fatale or a flower, may move. The light level may be low so you have to shoot at a slow shutter speed, and camera movement blurs the photo slightly. Or you may be photographing under bright overcast conditions outdoors--plenty of light for most situations--but you're shooting soccer...

William Davis Feb 01, 2006 1 comments

Stymied by all the buzz about megapixels, dpis, ppis, and what-have-you? Should you use a digital camera? Or shoot film? And which is really better? Well, yes, it's a veritable jungle of competing facts, pseudo-facts, and ideologies out there. Then there is the obsolescence factor. As someone who bought a Nikon F Photomic in 1968, a Linhof 4x5 in '70 and proceeded to...

Digital Darkroom
Howard Millard Jan 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

In the real world, as often as not, there'll be a problem with your background. In the precise spot where the light is right on your subject, the background might be too light, too dark, too cluttered, or you might even see the proverbial telephone pole sprouting from your subject's head. You needn't...

Digital Darkroom
Jeff Wignall Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Jeff Wignall, All Rights Reserved

I'd be a rich man if I had a buck for every time I've stumbled upon a great landscape scene only to mutter to myself (and anyone else within earshot), "What a horrible sky." There's something entirely deflating about finding an interesting foreground scene with a sky the color of aged...

David B. Brooks Jun 01, 2001 0 comments

Corel Print House 2000
Although there is a large selection of consumer entry-level photo applications for Windows, there are few off-the-shelf packages for the Mac. The Corel Print House 2000 is a welcome alternative. In fact, at...

Digital Darkroom
Steve Bedell May 01, 2007 0 comments

Retouching a portrait using film used to be a pretty simple task. Send the negative to your lab, check the “retouch” box, pay $5 or so, and the job was done.

Digital Darkroom
Howard Millard Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

If you want to heighten the impact of your black and white or monochrome images, consider taking them higher—to higher contrast, that is.

Digital Darkroom
David B. Brooks Dec 01, 2006 0 comments

This article is for those of you who color correct and adjust your image files to attain what looks like an ideal photograph on screen, but whose prints don't match that perfect screen image. Of all the challenges and disappointments digital photographers express to me in e-mails I receive almost daily, matching screen to print is the most common. It is also the most...