Digital Darkroom

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: May 01, 2007 0 comments

Stop shooting! That’s the first thing to do when you accidentally delete an image file or inadvertently format a memory card full of images.

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David B. Brooks Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, David B. Brooks, All Rights Reserved

The December 2001 issue of Shutterbug I reported on my trials and experiments with different methods of printing black and white photographs with ink jet printers. Today the challenge to a photographer using a digital darkroom who wants to do black and white prints remains similar to what it was three years ago.

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David B. Brooks Posted: Dec 01, 2001 0 comments

The output device for most digital darkrooms has become the photo-realistic ink jet printer. The printers that are designed to produce high quality photographic image reproduction are primarily color printers. They can be used for a wider...

Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

"There is nothing worse than a brilliant image of a fuzzy concept." --Ansel Adams

It could be that the sainted Adams meant a fuzzy image of a brilliant concept, but we'll never know. This month's column looks at using imaging software to blur an image and was inspired by a letter from reader Carol Baker. As a movie buff you gotta know...

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Howard Millard Posted: Sep 01, 2005 0 comments

They're both round and have a hole in the center. But are CDs and DVDs really digital life preservers? How long will they last? What are the safest and most reliable brands? What about hard drives--how safe are they? What can you do to best preserve your digital images and data? What are the best media to buy, how should you store them, and how do you archive and...

Steve Bedell Posted: Mar 01, 2000 0 comments

I have to admit something to you. About five years ago, when it was becoming very evident that digital technology would become increasingly important for the imaging professional, I tried to look the other way. I figured it would be a niche market. If they...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Mar 01, 1999 0 comments

For photographers one of the greatest advantages of digital photo processing is the ability to do all of your retouching, repair, and spotting just once and store it permanently in a computer file. Then, every print or other reproduction of the image is...

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Jay Abend Posted: Apr 01, 2001 0 comments

Oh, what a world we live in. Cell phones the size of a pack of chewing gum, 200 channels of cable TV, the Internet and digital cameras that anyone can afford. As technology marches forward everyone seems to get all wrapped up in the hardware...

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Ellen Anon Posted: Nov 01, 2005 0 comments

As more and more images are made digitally, whether directly from a camera or via scans, photographers, educators, and lecturers of all sorts are creating and displaying digital slide shows using a host of different projectors. It's even becoming difficult to find slide projectors at some venues. Yet, many digital photographers are horrified the first time they project their...

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Howard Millard Posted: Nov 01, 2004 0 comments

Could your portraits be enhanced by the mysterious, otherworldly glow of a black and white infrared (IR) effect? In the past, pre-digital darkroom, the only way you could get the IR look was shooting special IR film, quite a challenge to expose, process, and print correctly. Working digitally you can avoid many of the pitfalls and gain...

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Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2000 1 comments

It will probably come as no surprise to Shutterbug readers that digital cameras are now the number one computer peripheral. One of the things that people like to do with any kind of photograph--digital or otherwise--is to share, print, and frame them. This...

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Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Joe Farace, All Rights Reserved

The biggest challenge when photographing cars at auto shows--indoors or out--is dealing with cluttered backgrounds. In the past I've used low angles, high angles and postproduction techniques to blur the setting and add some zoom-zoom. That approach shifted my focus from the subject to its surroundings...

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Phillip Andrews Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

The prevailing attitude is that the only way to speed up Photoshop is to spend loads of money to buy the latest and best gear on the market. While it's true that better, faster, and more expensive gear will always drive those pixels around the screen with more speed than lower-priced systems, this is only part of the story. Many dedicated Photoshop users can get substantial...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Sep 01, 2003 0 comments

Most printers strive to make fine prints. Some succeed while others fail. The road to success does not start in the darkroom; it starts before you ever press the shutter release.
A fine print can be of any subject. The single most important key to...

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Rick Sammon Posted: Mar 01, 1999 0 comments

Quick question: most of Ansel Adams' landscape posters are a) color or b) black and white? Take your time. Think about this master's medium. Before you answer, also consider the type of pictures that sell.

If you answered...

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