LATEST ADDITIONS

Filed under
Shutterbug Staff Posted: Sep 01, 2005 0 comments

Nikon Inc. has announced version 4.3.1 updater of their Capture RAW (NEF) image
processing software. A complimentary copy of the update is available for current
users of version 4.2.x; if using version 4 that is earlier than 4.2, customers
must first upgrade to Version 4.2 and then install the new updater. All Version
4.x updaters are complimentary for owners of the full Version 4.0 and higher.
Upon installing the Capture 4.3.1 update, the D2X, D2HS, D70S, and D50 digital
SLR cameras, as well as earlier Nikon D-Series digital SLR cameras and their
NEF files will be supported. A highlight for the new updater is its significantly
faster performance for NEF operation. Depending upon the platform (Mac or PC),
CPU, and processes in use, this latest updater for Capture software delivers
increased processing speeds ranging from 11% up to 40%, compared to previous
versions.



A key component of Nikon's Total Imaging System, Capture software enables
photographers to perform comprehensive image processing and editing on NEF (RAW)
files produced by their Nikon digital SLR cameras as well as NEF files generated
from Nikon scanners or converted NEF files that have been generated from JPEG
or TIFF file formats. The NEF file structure has been idealized for operation
within the Nikon Total Imaging System. Key imaging data from the Nikon camera
is embedded within the NEF, and is available to strengthen the image processing
capabilities of Nikon Capture software. This nexus of Camera to NEF to Capture
embodies a key element of the Nikon Total Imaging System's ability to
optimize image quality.



www.nikonusa.com

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Filed under
Howard Millard Posted: Sep 01, 2005 0 comments

They're both round and have a hole in the center. But are CDs and DVDs really digital life preservers? How long will they last? What are the safest and most reliable brands? What about hard drives--how safe are they? What can you do to best preserve your digital images and data? What are the best media to buy, how should you store them, and how do you archive and...

Filed under
Shutterbug Staff Posted: Aug 31, 2005 0 comments

ATI Technologies Inc. is inviting photographers 13 years of age or older from
across North America to showcase their talent and compete for the ultimate digital
imaging system and other great prizes in ATI's new Snap! Share! Win! photo
contest.

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Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Aug 30, 2005 0 comments

The promise of digital imaging is that you can get one-touch corrections on
your photographs, making it easy to create the best images you can from every
picture you take. The phrase: "I won't worry about white balance,
exposure or contrast, etc....I'll fix it in Photoshop" is commonly
heard, but it isn't always the best course. If you shoot in Raw mode you
can fix anything, even exposure compensation, later, but not everyone wants
to go through the steps of working with Raw converters and all those sliders
and options. That's where the supposed magic of "auto" fixes
come into play, and yes, there are times when it can do wonders. Today, cameras
even have auto red-eye fix and amazing adjustments for backlighting problems.

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Filed under
Jon Canfield Posted: Aug 30, 2005 0 comments

As the price of wide format photo printers like the ones offered by Epson,
Canon, and HP continues to come down, more and more digital photo enthusiasts
are adding them to their digital darkrooms. For less than $400, you can now
print photo quality 11x14" images (actually, up to 13x19), saving money
and time without sending these prints out to a photo lab.

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Filed under
Shutterbug Staff Posted: Aug 30, 2005 0 comments

DXG USA has announced the availability of the DXG-528, a 5.1 megapixel CCD
digital camera. The DXG-528 features a slim aluminum housing, 2.4" LTPS
LCD screen, Pentax 3X optical zoom (with three aspherical lenses), built-in
32MB flash memory, SD/MMC card slot, MPEG-4 video with sound and Direct Print
capability. The camera also offers voice recorder and MP3 functionality, as
well as TV-Out capability for viewing pictures on a television. The DXG-528
is available immediately with an MSRP of $199.

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Filed under
Jon Canfield Posted: Aug 30, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Jon Canfield, All Rights Reserved

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Filed under
Shutterbug Staff Posted: Aug 29, 2005 0 comments

Lowepro
has introduced a new line of camera bags designed for sports photographers,
photojournalists or anyone who needs quick and easy access to their cameras
and accessories. The unique design of the new SlingShot 100 AW and 200 AW camera
bags allow photographers to go from "carry mode" to "ready
mode" in seconds. Without removing the bag, simply rotate or "sling"
the bag toward the front of the body. The SlingShot AW then provides complete
access to cameras, lenses, memory cards and other accessories. The Full Access
Lid with reverse open design allows photographers to safely and easily work
out of the bag and zip stop buckles keep equipment from falling out.

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Filed under
Shutterbug Staff Posted: Aug 26, 2005 0 comments

Duracell has announced additions to its rechargeable battery line to meet the
growing demands of high-drain devices like digital cameras. The new nickel-metal
hydride (NiMH) batteries, which include 2500 mAh AA and 900 mAh AAA cells, will
arrive on mass market, specialty and drug store shelves in September 2005.



The new products include Duracell's highest capacity rechargeable AA and
AAA cells ever, marking a significant enhancement to the existing line and demonstrating
the company's commitment to the category. Tests show the new AA 2500 mAh
NiMH batteries can be recharged hundreds of times and will yield up to 325 pictures
with every charge.



In addition to high performance rechargeable cells, the company also offers a
range of NiMH chargers that maximize convenience by charging most battery brands'
AA and AAA NiMH cells in as little as 30 minutes.



Duracell's new 2500 mAh and 900 mAh rechargeable batteries will be available
in two, four and eight cell packs. The suggested retail price for a four pack
of cells ranges from $9.99 to $13.99.
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Filed under
Shutterbug Staff Posted: Aug 25, 2005 0 comments

Firing at 8.5
frames per second for up to 48 full-resolution JPEG images in a burst (vs. the
same firing rate and a 40 JPEG burst for the 1D Mark II model), the new Canon
EOS-1D Mark II N camera ups the ante while retaining the superb CMOS Sensor of
the 1D Mark II model, with its convenient 1.3x lens conversion factor. Along with
its improved burst rate, the 1D Mark II N digital SLR adds a new 2.5-inch, wide-angle
view LCD/TFT monitor. Startup time on the new camera has also dropped to 0.2 seconds
(from 0.3) with the help of Canon's DIGIC II Image Processor.



The EOS-1D Mark II N camera shares with the EOS-1 series family its all-metal
body and chassis and weather-resistant construction with its shutter durability-tested
to 200,000 exposures. And perhaps best of all, the price of the new camera, $3,999,
is actually $500 less than the initial price of its predecessor.



Along with the new, 2.5-inch LCD wide-angle view display are several significant
improvements in image playback. For starters, the user can have a magnified view
from any selected AF point. Previously, magnified views took the center of the
image as the starting point, but a new menu item enables the user to select a
specific AF point and magnify the image in 15 steps with the press of a button.
Another new feature on the camera is magnified view during Quick Review. When
an image is displayed on the LCD monitor immediately after capture, the user can
immediately magnify the view to check focus right away. Other improved playback
functions include a last displayed image remembered feature and a more complete
INFO display which now shows file size and includes notations for monochrome (B/W)
and color (R/G/B) when the RGB histogram is enabled.



An improved image processing sequence and a better memory management method in
the EOS-1D Mark II N digital SLR has ramped up its burst capability with the camera
now able to shoot up to 22 RAW frames and up to 48 full-resolution JPEGs in burst.
The camera can also shoot 19 frames of RAW+JPEG (JPEG quality: 8, Picture Style:
Standard, ISO 100); and at 59 frames or better at the JPEG Middle 1 setting, 77
frames or better at JPEG Middle 2, and 135 or better at JPEG small, a substantial
increase. Additionally, the EOS-1D Mark II N digital SLR now creates new folders
automatically when file numbers reach 9999, making the new camera more responsive
in fast-moving news and sports photography situations. Photographers can even
customize the first four characters in filenames, enabling superior image organization
and camera identification capabilities.



Just like on the EOS-1D Mark II model, the EOS-1D Mark II N digital SLR lets the
user save the same image simultaneously in both the CompactFlash (CF) and SD memory
card slots, a highly effective backup mechanism. Photographers can also record
to slot one until it was full and then go to slot two as a reserve. Now, with
the EOS-1D Mark II N in RAW+JPEG mode, it's also possible to save the RAW and
JPEG images separately in each memory card. The RAW images can be saved in slot
one and the JPEGs, in any of ten quality levels, in slot two, or vice versa. Since
CF cards tend to be larger, currently, than SD cards, the RAW files will be likelier
to go on the CF card in slot one, but this is not required. The new option allows
images to be recorded separately according to usage, finally realizing a great
potential benefit of the dual slot configuration.



A new feature called Picture Styles combines processing parameters and color matrix
settings into easy settings designed to obtain the desired effect, almost like
choosing a type of film to obtain a specific result.



www.usa.canon.com.

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