Ingrid S. Krampe Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004 Ingrid S. Krampe, All Rights Reserved

To generate and continue our business growth from a small town in rural Georgia, we have focused on the equestrian market. This geographically broad niche seems to have a generous amount of expendable dollars, as well as an ample interest in images and related art. The most challenging aspect of the business--beyond...

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George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2005 Published: May 20, 2005 0 comments

My favorite book when I was a kid was the atlas. I would plan elaborate journeys through mountainous regions, follow the shipping news in The New York Times, and ogle the fascinating people and places in Life magazine while waiting for a haircut at the local barbershop. For me, getting there was the point and being there was the reward. I started my travel habit with bicycle trips...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004 Joe Farace, All Rights Reserved

"Creative work is play. It is free speculation using materials of one's chosen form."
--Stephen Nachmanovitch

The GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free open source photo retouching and image authoring program. While some of its fans claim it's just as good as Adobe...

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David B. Brooks Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Digital Help is designed to aid you in getting the most from your digital photography, printing, scanning, and image creation. Each month, David Brooks provides solutions to problems you might encounter with matters such as color calibration and management, digital printer and scanner settings, and working with digital photographic images with many different kinds of...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: May 01, 2005 1 comments

Photos © 2004, Frances E. Schultz, All Rights Reserved

How brown do you like your toast? The answer, of course, is "It depends." What kind of bread is it? How old is the bread? How thick? What are you going to put on it? How are you feeling at the time? You can't make hard and fast rules, even for yourself. It's even harder to make toast for...

Roger W. Hicks Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

The Baldessa 1 from Balda in the Schwarzwald is one of those cameras that quickens the heart of a collector simply by its looks: beautiful styling and a superb late-1950s West German finish. Unfortunately upon closer examination it turns out to be a bit of a bimbo (for the ladies, think of it as a himbo or dumb hunk--I don't want to be unduly sexist).


George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Dubbed "the world's smallest optical zoom digital camera," the Casio Exilim Card EX-S100 is business-card size at a mere 0.66" thick and just 3.46" at its longest dimension. But despite its size the EX-S100 yields excellent color files from its 3.2-megapixel chip and has a whopping...

Jon Canfield Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Canon's new flat-bed scanner, the CanoScan 9950F boasts an impressive feature set that will appeal to photographers who either shoot film or have a collection of film that is waiting to be converted to digital. In this review I'll take a look at how well the scanner performs and whether it earns a place in the digital darkroom.

The 9950F is the...

George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

About a year ago I called up a stock agency to whom I'd been submitting 35mm and 6x7 slides for years and told them I was considering sending digital files. "Oh, don't worry about that, we scan your slides for you," they kindly replied. No, I told them, I want to start submitting files made...

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Maria Piscopo Posted: May 01, 2005 Published: Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

Donna Poehner has a unique perspective to offer on the subject of travel photography. As an editor and writer, she has worked for F+W Publications for the past 11 years. In 1999, she became editor of the widely read sourcebook Photographer's Market ( In that time, Poehner has learned a lot...


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