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Steve Bedell Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

Given the current state of technology, a case could be made that a photographer could exist today with only two lenses--a wide angle to moderate zoom, and a short tele to long tele-zoom. That would be a mistake. For as good and flexible as today's zoom lenses are, there are some compelling reasons to choose fixed focal length lenses on occasion. I'll admit, 90 percent...

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Rick Sammon Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

"Antarctica is a separate is the presence of ice, from the first occasional fragment, escalating in shape, form and frequency, and finally dominating all else, that brings assurance of arrival in Antarctica."--Mark Jones, from Wild Ice: Antarctic Journeys (available on

Taking pictures in Antarctica is easy. Point your camera...

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

The Picture This! assignment for this month was High Sensitivity, pictures taken at ISO 800 and beyond. Readers sent in a host of images that took advantage of high-speed settings on their digital cameras and on high-speed film. At those speeds images made in very low light become available, and many more "chances" are taken with pictures that in the past might have...

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Joseph A. Dickerson Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

It's a well-known tenet that Perspective Control (PC) or tilt/shift lenses are intended for shooting architectural subjects. But who says you have to use them that way?

A PC lens lets you do a certain amount of tilt/shift, rise/fall control, a limited equivalent to a technique that view camera photographers can fully exploit via the...

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Jack Hollingsworth Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

With a lot of my business coming from stock images, I travel at least six months of the year to take pictures related to travel, leisure, health, lifestyles, and business. Along with a lot of other stock and travel photographers, I've realized that the next frontiers for photographs are India and China. They are the emerging markets, and more and more photographs from those...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

When I first heard about a 35mm focal length macro lens my mouth began to water. The $229 price tag was an immediate inducement, as were the compactness and lightweight of this glass. What threw me, though, was the focal length. Because this was in the new Four Thirds System for an Olympus digital SLR (the EVOLT E-300 was used for this test), focal length doubled to 70mm. A 70mm...

Stan Trzoniec Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

My first macro lens was the popular Nikon 60mm Micro-Nikkor. Good move, I thought, as the 60mm focal length could double as an all-purpose lens for a variety of assignments. Trouble is, when I started to get into more and more 1:1 (life-size) work, I only had 21/2" of working space between the front of the lens and my subject. The 105mm was next, sharp as a tack but again...

Robert E. Mayer Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

Please confine yourself to only one question per letter. Both postal letters and e-mails are fine, although we prefer e-mail as the most efficient form of communication. Send your e-mail queries to with Help in the subject header and your return e-mail address at the end of your message.

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

Whenever I need a visual shot in the arm I take my camera to somewhere I've never been, or switch lenses, or both. As this issue is weighted toward the exploration of optics, I'll focus here on the changing lenses part of the equation.

All of us have a favorite lens, the one that best expresses our vision, and that delivers the crisp images we...

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Joe Farace Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

"Only the mediocre are alwlays at their best."
--Jean Giraudoux

Two quotes this month: The first by Alan Kay was on my mind while replying to the editor of my book The Complete Guide to Digital Infrared Photography--I didn't choose that title. He asked: "If I want to emulate the look of color IR film is a plug-in or (digital)...