George Schaub

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George Schaub  |  Aug 23, 2011  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2011  |  0 comments
I remember a story Fred Picker once told about showing his portfolio to a curator at a museum in New England. Fred photographed in the British Isles, near his home in Vermont and places far and wide, and trained his eye and lens on natural forms and man-made totems in nature. His favorite photographer was Paul Strand, though his photo collection ranged as far as his travels. In any case, in goes Fred to this curator, who quickly breezes through the images and dismisses the lot, saying, “We don’t need any more rocks and trees.”
George Schaub  |  Jun 27, 2006  |  0 comments

The New Pigment Ink Printers: How They Change Desktop Printing

by George Schaub

You wouldn't think that a small thing like changing the type of ink a
printer uses would have a profound effect on desktop photo printing, but that's
what the new products from Canon and HP might do. That change is offering pigment...

George Schaub  |  Nov 10, 2011  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2011  |  2 comments

The 12.1-megapixel Nikon COOLPIX P500 ($399.95, MSRP) is an integral lens camera with an incredible zoom range of 36x—that’s optical, not digital zoom and it gives you the equivalent angle of view of a wide-angle 22.5mm to a super tele of 810mm! The Zoom-Nikkor ED glass lens can also be used for “super close-ups” with a minimum focusing distance of 0.4”.

George Schaub  |  Aug 01, 2003  |  0 comments

The Nikon N75

Now that digital SLRs are knocking on the door, film SLRs are undergoing a renaissance that makes them smaller, lighter, easier to use and carry. They also are incorporating many advanced features of their pro film SLR cousins but...

George Schaub  |  Mar 01, 2004  |  0 comments

One of the glories of digital cameras is that you have as many options as you could desire in terms of exposure, white balance, file format and compression, sharpness, contrast, color saturation, bracketing, flash modes, and ISO settings, etc., all in each frame. This allows you to bring all your photo...

George Schaub  |  Mar 14, 2012  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2012  |  2 comments
I grew up in a black-and-white photographic world. Sure there was color and plenty of it, but what attracted my eye were the black-and-white pictorials in Life magazine, black-and-white movies like The Third Man and the film noir B-flicks, and the amazing work that came out of the FSA and that of Weston, Evans, and Siskind. When I began photography “seriously” I couldn’t imagine shooting in color, except for the rent-paying jobs, or not being the one who processed and printed my own work.
George Schaub  |  Mar 17, 2014  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2014  |  0 comments
While every image we make with a digital camera starts out as a color (RGB) image, it doesn’t preclude creating dynamic black-and-white photos from those image files. In fact, the ability to “convert” to color lends itself to producing more tonally rich images than we ever could have imagined when working with black-and-white silver materials.
George Schaub  |  Jan 07, 2014  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2013  |  0 comments
Not long ago when you wanted even a modicum of quality with the ability to interchange lenses and control over cameras and functions worthy of the craft you’d mainly have to choose among a variety of D-SLR-type cameras. While they all followed the 35mm SLR form and even modes of operation, the digital differentiator was generally the size and megapixel count on the sensor. While there certainly were variations and competitive technologies within different brands, the major split was between APS-C and so-called “full frame” (larger sensors equaling the 35mm format). Improvements tended to drift “down” from full-framers to APS-C, but there were also a number of concessions, if you will, that moved up from APS-C to the more pro-oriented models, which for some muddied the waters although body construction, shutter cycles, and other matters of concern to pros were retained in the higher-priced cameras.
George Schaub  |  Jun 26, 2007  |  0 comments

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Courtesy of Sigma Corporation, All Rights Reserved

George Schaub  |  Sep 14, 2012  |  0 comments
There are three general metering patterns available in most cameras—pattern (evaluative, matrix or other nomenclature, depending on the brand), center-weighted averaging and spot. Of all of them, spot gives you the greatest personal control over brightness and tonal values, which is how you become more engaged in your work. But being in the realm of personal creativity and decision-making means it demands more attention in return. In this article we’ll cover why you might want to give this least-used metering pattern a try.

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