Outdoor Tips

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Mike Stensvold  |  Apr 01, 2004  |  0 comments
Spring is the season of rebirth and renewal—hence, the ritual of spring cleaning. It's also a season of contrasts: there's still snow in the high elevations, while the lower regions come into bloom; and there are hot summery spells and cold wintry spells interspersed with milder days. So in most areas, you can shoot "winter" shots and "summer" shots in thespring...
Lynne Eodice  |  Aug 01, 2003  |  0 comments

All photos by David Schultz

 

According to nature photographer David Schultz, "Spring and Fall are my busy times for picture-taking." Aspen and maple trees adorned in fall colors are big sellers at West Light Images, Schultz' photo gallery located in Park City, Utah. People also enjoy decorating their walls with spring wildflowers, he observes.

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Lynne Eodice  |  Oct 01, 2004  |  1 comments

Autumn is a season of change, accompanied by colorful foliage, pumpkin patches, and costumed children decked out for Halloween. Days become shorter and the sun is positioned lower in the southern sky, creating warmer light than in the summer months.

If you want to photograph fall colors, find out when the peak time will be.

Lynne Eodice  |  Nov 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Lynne Eodice is an accomplished writer/photographer and a regular contributor to Photographic magazine.

 

The word photography literally means "painting with light." Thus, twilight is one of the best times to take pictures, as the light at that time is magical. You can capture colorful clouds at sunset time, silhouetted objects against a colorful sky, or the...

Jack Neubart  |  Jul 08, 2016  |  0 comments

Anuar Patjane Floriuk, popularly known as Anuar Patjane, has been scuba diving for 17 years. Much of his photography in the past has been focused on travel around the globe, but lately he’s been giving in more and more to his fascination with the sea. He’s been shooting underwater for five of those 17 years and finds the camera a natural extension of his inner being, helping him explore and fathom pelagic life, especially whales, and himself in the process.

The Editors  |  Aug 01, 2002  |  0 comments

 

 

 

 

Electronic Flash : More than just spare light

What is an electronic flash unit? For one thing, it's spare light, conveniently packaged in a "little black box"—a compact, portable light source that enables you to take photos of many subjects when there isn't enough light to do so...

Lynne Eodice  |  Mar 01, 2004  |  0 comments

All Photos by Cappy Jackson

 

A prize-winning photographer who's best known for her equestrian images, Cappy Jackson got an early start. At age 14 she became an assistant to an established pro, Peter Winants, who was the staff photographer for a magazine called Maryland...

Mike Stensvold  |  Sep 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Photographing action is quite challenging, but can also be very rewarding. The keys to success are knowing your camera, knowing your subject...and LOTS of practice. You have to be able to set focus and exposure quickly (or monitor them quickly, if using an automatic camera). In short, you can't be fumbling around trying to figure out how to apply exposure compensation or...

Mike Stensvold  |  Sep 01, 2004  |  0 comments

All Photos by Mike Stensvold

 

Proper exposure is important. Color-print film has a lot of "latitude," and digital images can be manipulated extensively, but a properly exposed image will always look better than a "corrected" poorly exposed one.
What is "proper" exposure, anyway? Well, it's the exposure that gives you the...

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 02, 2019  |  0 comments

Even if you don’t snorkel, ski or engage in any outdoor activities that can be unfriendly toward cameras, you need a ruggedized, waterproof, compact zoom that can stay in your pocket through cloudbursts, snowball fights and a capsized canoe without fret or falter. They are the SUVs of the camera world, and they’re great for younger kids, too. (And if you’re looking for a Mother’s Day, Father’s Day or Graduation gift, these cameras…

The Editors  |  Mar 01, 2005  |  0 comments

You should always shoot with your eyes wide open (at least, the one looking through the viewfinder). But often it pays to shoot with your lens wide open, too.

Wide apertures let in more light, so you can use a faster shutter speed in any given light level. This is handy for anything from low-light photography to action shooting.

 

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