Outdoor Tips

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Lynne Eodice  |  Jan 01, 2004  |  0 comments

 

 

 

As the subject of a photograph, texture speaks to our sense of touch. The way that things feel is very ingrained in our consciousness. Texture tells us about the nature of a subject, whether it's the rough surface of a straw hat, or the silky smoothness of satin. The light that reveals an object's texture also gives us a sense of...

Lynne Eodice  |  Feb 01, 2003  |  0 comments

 

 

 

 

Photographers and painters have long been intrigued by reflections, and no wonder—there are numerous creative possibilities to be found in reflective surfaces. Whether you find fascinating images reflected in water, metal, a mirror—or even soap bubbles—there are certain tips to keep...

Lynne Eodice  |  May 01, 2004  |  0 comments

 

 

 

Rural scenes provide picturesque photo opportunities for those who love to get away from the hustle and bustle of city life. These settings convey feelings of tranquility. If you're like a lot of landscape shooters, scenery that includes barns, covered bridges, and miles of open fields may inspire you photographically.

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Lynne Eodice  |  Mar 01, 2003  |  0 comments

 

 

 

 

When a photo emphasizes a particular color, it often dictates the mood of the picture—be it warm or cool, bright or muted. Blue is usually associated with soothing, cool and more-somber moods. Conversely, the color red conjures up emotions like passion, heat, love, and even anger.

We often...

Lynne Eodice  |  May 01, 2003  |  0 comments

 

 

 

It seems that everywhere you look, you see nature photos that include water in its many forms, whether they're waves crashing on a rocky coastline, snow on a hillside, dewdrops on flower petals, or a simple ripple on a pond. For outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy taking pictures of water, the possibilities are...

Lynne Eodice  |  Jun 01, 2003  |  0 comments

 

 

 

There are a number of ways to portray "heat" in a photograph. First of all, you can use color. Perhaps more than any other design element, color determines the mood of your pictures. You can establish the entire mood of your photo by emphasizing a particular color scheme—reds, golds, and oranges are...

Lynne Eodice  |  Oct 01, 2000  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2000  |  0 comments

 

 

 

 

Photographing wildlife presents special challenges, especially if you own a compact camera. You may not have the powerful lenses that professionals use, but you can still do nicely with a moderate telephoto setting on your point-and-shoot camera, if it has one. As with household pets, wild animals...

Lynne Eodice  |  Mar 01, 2004  |  0 comments

 

 

 

One of the most challenging—and gratifying—subjects to photograph is wildlife. The primary obstacle is getting close enough to wild animals to take dramatic photos of them. Your best bet is a telephoto lens—a few point-and-shoot film cameras offer built-in zooms as long as 200mm at the telephoto end, and...

Lynne Eodice  |  Feb 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Robert Farber is renowned for his painterly images. Throughout the years, he's carved a niche with his romantic, illustrative approach to photographing nudes, landscapes and a variety of other subjects that have been featured in books like By The Sea and Farber Nudes.

 

He's continued this tradition with a new book, entitled American Mood...

Lynne Eodice  |  Nov 01, 2005  |  1 comments

Born in India in 1967, Subhankar Banerjee received a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering before moving to the US where he earned a master's degree in physics and computer science. He later accepted a job with Boeing in Seattle, Washington, and became a successful scientist. So why would he switch gears and devote himself to shooting pictures in Arctic...

Lynne Eodice  |  Feb 01, 2005  |  0 comments

When you view a smooth, shiny surface from the proper angle--such as glass, metal or water--you'll see a reflected image. These reflections provide you with a great opportunity to add interest to a photo by showing two different aspects of the environment at the same time. Since the reflected portion of the image is almost always distorted, it often lends a surreal...

Lynne Eodice  |  Nov 01, 2004  |  0 comments

A lot of photo enthusiasts say, "The sun's out--time to take pictures," and put their camera away come nightfall. But if this is your philosophy, you're missing half the fun of photography. You can take some exciting night shots of colorful neon signs, the streaked taillights of traffic in motion, or shadowy figures silhouetted by street lights.

The Editors  |  Dec 01, 2004  |  0 comments

It's winter, and with the season come wonderful opportunities to produce some great snow and ice photos. On the following pages are a few tips to help you do just that.

The basic idea is to have the brightest areas of snow or ice appear white, but with a trace of detail. Very small areas can be blank white, but large areas should have some texture and detail.

Lynne Eodice  |  Oct 01, 2002  |  0 comments

 

 

 

When photographing interesting cities, you'll find it very convenient to travel light—a point-and-shoot camera will free you to concentrate on compositions and allow you to respond more quickly to great photo opportunities. If your camera has a built-in zoom lens, use it at its widest setting for...

The Editors  |  Feb 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Good photographs needn't be complicated.

You can often make better pictures by thinking "simple."

Instead of trying to get as much as possible into the shot, try to include as little as possible. Ideally, you should include everything that adds to the picture, and nothing else. But that's a tall order for those new to photography...

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