Outdoor Photography How To

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Barry Tanenbaum  |  Jan 31, 2013  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2012  |  11 comments

While most of us are dedicated to capturing fleeting moments by slicing seconds into ever smaller fractions, Michael S. Miller has a different tale to tell. In a project he calls Long Light, he takes the time to let the moments simply accrue.

 

Long Light began with Michael’s viewing of historic view camera images. One in particular—a Mississippi riverboat, blurred by the camera’s slow shutter speed—caught his attention. “The water had this mystical kind of feeling to it because of the long exposure,” Michael says, “and I thought, all right, let’s see what happens if I do some long exposures of rivers.”

Chuck Graham  |  Nov 19, 2012  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2012  |  4 comments

“A super wide-angle lens will encompass Mount Whitney and Mount Russell with Iceberg Lake in the foreground.”

 

Mount Whitney, located on the eastern fringe of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, is the tallest peak in the Eastern Sierra and the contiguous United States. A four-hour drive north of Los Angeles, its lofty summit at 14,494 feet is sought after by hikers and climbers from all over the world. It’s also a favorite of landscape photographers seeking to capture the right compositions as soft pink and orange hues soak into the gritty granite mountain at dawn.

Josh Miller  |  May 21, 2012  |  20 comments

Since the development of photography in the early 1800s, there has always been a strong tradition of photographers using their work to promote conservation and social justice issues. One need only to look at the development of the National Park System in the United States to see the impact early photographers had on conservation. William Henry Jackson, with his 1871 Yellowstone photographs, helped push through legislation that established Yellowstone as the world’s first National Park. Another well-known example of a conservationist photographer was Ansel Adams, whose tireless efforts both as a photographer and as a 37-year member of the Sierra Club’s Board of Directors led to the establishment of Kings Canyon National Park in 1940.

Lynne Eodice  |  Nov 01, 2005  |  1 comments

Born in India in 1967, Subhankar Banerjee received a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering before moving to the US where he earned a master's degree in physics and computer science. He later accepted a job with Boeing in Seattle, Washington, and became a successful scientist. So why would he switch gears and devote himself to shooting pictures in Arctic...

Lynne Eodice  |  Nov 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Lynne Eodice is an accomplished writer/photographer and a regular contributor to Photographic magazine.

 

The word photography literally means "painting with light." Thus, twilight is one of the best times to take pictures, as the light at that time is magical. You can capture colorful clouds at sunset time, silhouetted objects against a colorful sky, or the...

Mike Stensvold  |  Sep 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Photographing action is quite challenging, but can also be very rewarding. The keys to success are knowing your camera, knowing your subject...and LOTS of practice. You have to be able to set focus and exposure quickly (or monitor them quickly, if using an automatic camera). In short, you can't be fumbling around trying to figure out how to apply exposure compensation or...

Mike Stensvold  |  Jul 01, 2005  |  19 comments

Photography is all about light. But wherever there's light, there are shadows lurking nearby. And therein lie some great photo ops.

 

Exposing Shadows
Contrasty shadow scenes can fool reflected light meters, such as those built into cameras. A spot meter enables you to meter the most important highlight area, and determine an exposure that will give...

Lynne Eodice  |  May 01, 2005  |  0 comments

About Lynne...
Lynne Eodice is a writer/photographer and popular contributor to Photographic magazine.

 

Morning conjures up thoughts of beautiful sunrises, the start of a new day, and perhaps brewing a cup of coffee while reading the newspaper. Photographers enjoy shooting early in the morning (and late in the day) for dramatic light. When shooting...

Text and photography by Mike Stensvold  |  Apr 01, 2005  |  0 comments

The world looks different from the air, and aerial photography thus offers some unique photo opportunities.

If you're not a pilot, probably the best way to get aerial photos through a flight school at your local general-aviation airport. Training planes can fly fairly slowly, and the instructors will be familiar with the area's airspace, and experienced at...

Mike Stensvold  |  Mar 01, 2005  |  1 comments

Autofocusing is one of the best things that's ever happened to the SLR camera. I didn't think so while testing early examples when the AF SLR era began back in 1985, but a lot of progress has happened in the ensuing two decades. Today's AF SLR cameras, film and digital, will focus more quickly and accurately than most photographers can. Naturally, the higher-end...

The Editors  |  Mar 01, 2005  |  0 comments

You should always shoot with your eyes wide open (at least, the one looking through the viewfinder). But often it pays to shoot with your lens wide open, too.

Wide apertures let in more light, so you can use a faster shutter speed in any given light level. This is handy for anything from low-light photography to action shooting.

 

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The Editors  |  Mar 01, 2005  |  3 comments

Beware the dark side, that famous sci-fi-movie "master" more than once cautioned his young protege re "The Force." But the dark side--a.k.a. shadows--is well worth the photographer's attention. While the eye is drawn to bright areas in a photograph, the interplay between bright and dark--between highlight and shadow--can make for a...

Mike Stensvold  |  Feb 01, 2005  |  8 comments

When you focus your camera's lens on a subject, the point focused upon is sharp. Objects in the scene closer or farther than that point appear progressively less sharp as their distance from the focused point increases.

Depth of field refers to the area in front of and beyond the point focused upon in which things appear acceptably sharp in a photograph. Depth of...

The Editors  |  Feb 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Good photographs needn't be complicated.

You can often make better pictures by thinking "simple."

Instead of trying to get as much as possible into the shot, try to include as little as possible. Ideally, you should include everything that adds to the picture, and nothing else. But that's a tall order for those new to photography...

Lynne Eodice  |  Feb 01, 2005  |  0 comments

When you view a smooth, shiny surface from the proper angle--such as glass, metal or water--you'll see a reflected image. These reflections provide you with a great opportunity to add interest to a photo by showing two different aspects of the environment at the same time. Since the reflected portion of the image is almost always distorted, it often lends a surreal...

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