George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 14, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 2 comments
I grew up in a black-and-white photographic world. Sure there was color and plenty of it, but what attracted my eye were the black-and-white pictorials in Life magazine, black-and-white movies like The Third Man and the film noir B-flicks, and the amazing work that came out of the FSA and that of Weston, Evans, and Siskind. When I began photography “seriously” I couldn’t imagine shooting in color, except for the rent-paying jobs, or not being the one who processed and printed my own work.
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George Schaub Posted: Mar 08, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 1 comments
Operating as a plug-in for Lightroom, Aperture, or as a stand-alone workspace, Perfect Layers from onOne Software distills down and codifies the often-complex task of working in Layers to a fairly simple task, offering various Blend modes, composite shortcuts and tools that might otherwise pose a steep learning curve. You can use numerous source files, including Raw, TIFF, and JPEG formats, and scale and move the various layers as required. In short, Perfect Layers poses an effective tool for those who have wanted to work in Layers out of Aperture and Lightroom and opens up new doors to image creation.

The onOne workspace contains toolbars on the left and modifications and working options on the right, #1. Once you have selected an image or images from an organizer such as the Library in Lightroom, they load as separate Layers in the center screen. You choose the images to be used by selecting them from the Library or Browser, then going to File>Plug-In Extras>Perfect Layers. Here’s the selection process shown in Lightroom 3, #2.

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 10, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 2 comments
First off, the staff of Shutterbug wishes the very best for you and yours during the coming year. We thank you for your continued support, ideas and images, and look forward to another great year in 2012.
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George Schaub Posted: Jan 26, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2011 2 comments
There comes a point in your photographic life when you might consider making money with your camera. It might be a life’s goal from the start, and you put the time into assisting, attending workshops, and even taking formal lessons or enrolling in a school dedicated to the craft. But more often than not it’s something that occurs to you along the way, something that sticks in the back of your mind as you lay awake at night. You consider it because of your love and dedication to making photographs, and your feeling that making a living with something you love to do would be a good way to go through life. But the question remains—just how do you get started, how do you make the transition or the first step?
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George Schaub Posted: Dec 19, 2011 Published: Nov 01, 2011 1 comments
There’s no question that glossy and satin or pearl-type surfaces give an image more “pop,” but on the other hand you might want to use a matte surface to enhance the look and feel of certain images that rely less on pop than a quieter mood. It could be boiled down to a simple rule of thumb: for rich, high-saturation images you might use a glossy or semigloss; for more subtle colors it might be better to use a matte or satin. In the black-and-white realm it’s more of a toss-up but I think the same general rule applies. For example, for architectural images of adobe or stucco wall buildings I use matte; for glass and steel skyscrapers I choose glossy. Notice that I always modify the recommendations with “might”: if you really get into papers for printing you’ll make your own judgments. But there’s no denying that surface decisions play a role in overall effectiveness of the image.

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 13, 2011 Published: Nov 01, 2011 0 comments
It’s hard to beat the beautiful quality of “natural” light. As I write this I am looking out my studio window at dusk, right when the rays of the setting sun backlight the magnolia leaves swaying in the wind, and there are thousands of facets of illumination that move together as one. Yet, photographers face the fact that light is not always so kind and gentle, and that subjects do not sway in the wind to add grace to the moment, and that there are some times when you have to make the shot when the light is just plain lousy, or the weather, setup, and subject make it an indoors occasion in small rooms lacking any kind of pleasing, or even ambient light worth shooting in.
George Schaub Posted: Dec 07, 2011 2 comments
The Leica X1 ($1,995) is a fixed focal length, non-interchangeable lens compact with a fast f/2.8 lens and 12.9MP CMOS APS-C sensor. Introduced over a year ago in silver and recently in black, it keeps apace with firmware upgrades, the most recent of which is claimed improvement of JPEG quality and enhanced AF speed in low light.
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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2011 Published: Oct 01, 2011 1 comments
Gerald L. Fine, of Northbrook, Illinois and Rancho Mirage, California, passed away on July 5, 2011 at the age of 85. Jerry was a kind and devoted husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. He was also an astute businessman who, 50 years ago, founded Neil Enterprises, Inc. and guided it to become the largest photo novelty company in the country. A marketing and merchandising expert and innovator, Jerry pioneered a myriad of photo-related promotional products, including the photo mug and photo keychain. He had a vision, an entrepreneurial spirit, and a generosity that always put people over profits.

His dedication and determination helped grow the company into the success it is today. The company is now in its third generation with Jerry’s children and grandchildren working there, including Neil Fine, the current president.

Jerry Fine was born on December 28, 1925 in Chicago, Illinois. He graduated from Hyde Park High School and joined the Navy where he was stationed at Pearl Harbor during World War II. He returned to Chicago after the war and attended the University of Illinois at Navy Pier and received his degree in accounting at Northwestern University. In 1947, he met the love of his life, Lois Berman, at the Merchandise Mart where he worked at his uncle’s liquor store and she at her aunts’ lingerie shop. Together, they lived a charmed life, enjoyed a loving, 62-year-marriage, raised a beautiful family, and created a thriving business. He is survived by his wife Lois; his three children, Carol (Robert Jacobson), Andrea (Eric London), and Neil Fine (Karen); his nine grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

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