George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 10, 2011 0 comments
This is a test report on the new Panasonic FZ48 integral lens camera. The camera looks like a compact SLR. It has a big grip on the right hand side of the body, which allows for comfortable handling for shooting, important for a long-range zoom such as this.
George Schaub Posted: Sep 30, 2011 5 comments
The SD1 is Sigma’s new flagship SLR system. It uses a brand new sensor with Foveon technology and a nominal resolution of 14.8 MP. This means that the camera is able to record RGB information for every single pixel. Standard digital cameras use sensors with the “classic” Bayer pattern, which means that every single pixel detects only one color information (red, green or blue) and then must undergo color interpolation.
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George Schaub Posted: Sep 16, 2011 Published: Aug 01, 2011 0 comments
In this issue we feature the TIPA Awards for products in 40 different categories and I thought you might like to know how the finalists were chosen. TIPA, the Technical Image Press Association, is composed of representatives from photographic magazines around the world, editors, who go through the process of first nominating products by a Technical Committee and then voting on what they consider the best or most innovative products in their respective categories. Editors are from pro, advanced amateur, and amateur photo magazines, including those from Australia, Canada, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, South Africa, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States, from which Shutterbug is the sole member.
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George Schaub Posted: Sep 15, 2011 Published: Aug 01, 2011 1 comments
Having shot with numerous Lensbaby products over the past years I’ve almost grown accustomed to their ingenious approach to image-making tools and the equally ingenious way in which they approach product design. I do have to admit that one area in which I took less advantage than I might have was in aperture control and how that affected depth of field in my Lensbaby shots, more from laziness or simply forgetting about changing the aperture inserts as I got involved in the shoot. (For those who have not shot with Lensbaby optics you lift in and drop out, via supplied magnetic wand, the various aperture rings corresponding to the diameter of the desired aperture for the optic in use.) Now, this impediment to getting the most from the optics (admittedly, again, my own) is removed with their latest product, the Sweet 35 Optic.
George Schaub Posted: Sep 07, 2011 2 comments
The A-35 is based on the Sony SLT system, which means the camera uses a translucent mirror system. The mirror is fixed and therefore the camera doesn’t offer an optical SLR viewfinder; instead, it uses a high resolution electronic viewfinder and an LCD monitor – just like a CSC (compact system camera).The ELV of the Sony A35 has a resolution of 1.15 million RGB dots and shows a very crisp and clear image.
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George Schaub Posted: Aug 24, 2011 0 comments
It’s not only New Yorkers who experienced the horror and sadness, and incredible human spirit brought forth by the events of 9/11. This event, which has changed the world in both profound and subtle ways, is something that all can relate to. While none who were alive that day will ever forget where they were at the time of the attacks, it is important to keep in mind not only the people who we lost, but those who served above and beyond the call of duty to serve their fellow human beings. This show, held at the Time Warner Center in New York, brings this event and the people involved to the forefront, and is a moving tribute to their spirit and humanity.

We recently attended this exhibition and encourage everyone who has the chance to do so, and hope that the images and words it contains will be brought to more venues so all can experience it. What follows is part of the press material distributed at the opening, where many of the individuals pictured were on hand to share their stories and experiences. It reminded us all why photography and story telling are so important a part of history, and can serve as both remembrance of those who have passed and as honoring those who served. This special exhibition was sponsored by  Nikon, with modern prints sponsored by Adorama. On hand was Mr. McNally who talked about the creation of the work and his heartfelt reflections on the people and subject he so ably depicted. The exhibition is running through Sept, 12, 2011, and we encourage everyone who can see the show to do so. –George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 23, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 1 comments
I remember a story Fred Picker once told about showing his portfolio to a curator at a museum in New England. Fred photographed in the British Isles, near his home in Vermont and places far and wide, and trained his eye and lens on natural forms and man-made totems in nature. His favorite photographer was Paul Strand, though his photo collection ranged as far as his travels. In any case, in goes Fred to this curator, who quickly breezes through the images and dismisses the lot, saying, “We don’t need any more rocks and trees.”
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George Schaub Posted: Aug 18, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 5 comments
I took on this review assignment because I’ve had considerable history with printing, both silver and digital, and printing with Epson printers. Over the past few years this interest has led me on an odyssey through various printers, profiling, and a considerable amount of (early) frustration. My emphasis has been on monochrome printing and those who share in this interest and who have attempted black-and-white printing in the past understand the numerous obstacles it can present. Those include, but are not limited to, unwanted color casts, gloss differential in deep black areas and some tonal borders, poor deep black reproduction (accompanied by equally poor highlight repro), a lot of poor paper surfaces, and the hassle and waste of switching from matte black to photo glossy inks. Color printers face these as well, plus the challenges of color balance, casts, skin tone reproduction, highlight bias, green shadows, and more. Of late I have printed with the Epson Stylus Pro 3800, 3880, and 4800 models, the 3800 being my studio workhorse for years and the 3880 the model that many photo schools and workshops at which I’ve taught use as a mainstay student and production printer.

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