George Schaub
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Vote
George Schaub Sep 14, 2011 0 comments
Please comment briefly on what wireless or network systems or devices you have interconnected in your home or studio.
Does wireless connectivity or networking play a part in your home or studio digital darkroom and printing setups?
Yes I have a printer, scanner, TV or other device set up on my home network to look at and/or work on my images.
63% (67 votes)
No, but I have wireless Internet and am thinking about getting other systems in place.
21% (23 votes)
No, I have no intention of getting involved in wireless or network setups.
16% (17 votes)
Total votes: 107
George Schaub Sep 07, 2011 2 comments
The A-35 is based on the Sony SLT system, which means the camera uses a translucent mirror system. The mirror is fixed and therefore the camera doesn’t offer an optical SLR viewfinder; instead, it uses a high resolution electronic viewfinder and an LCD monitor – just like a CSC (compact system camera).The ELV of the Sony A35 has a resolution of 1.15 million RGB dots and shows a very crisp and clear image.
News
George Schaub Aug 24, 2011 0 comments
It’s not only New Yorkers who experienced the horror and sadness, and incredible human spirit brought forth by the events of 9/11. This event, which has changed the world in both profound and subtle ways, is something that all can relate to. While none who were alive that day will ever forget where they were at the time of the attacks, it is important to keep in mind not only the people who we lost, but those who served above and beyond the call of duty to serve their fellow human beings. This show, held at the Time Warner Center in New York, brings this event and the people involved to the forefront, and is a moving tribute to their spirit and humanity.

We recently attended this exhibition and encourage everyone who has the chance to do so, and hope that the images and words it contains will be brought to more venues so all can experience it. What follows is part of the press material distributed at the opening, where many of the individuals pictured were on hand to share their stories and experiences. It reminded us all why photography and story telling are so important a part of history, and can serve as both remembrance of those who have passed and as honoring those who served. This special exhibition was sponsored by  Nikon, with modern prints sponsored by Adorama. On hand was Mr. McNally who talked about the creation of the work and his heartfelt reflections on the people and subject he so ably depicted. The exhibition is running through Sept, 12, 2011, and we encourage everyone who can see the show to do so. –George Schaub

Editor's Notes
George Schaub Aug 23, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 1 comments
I remember a story Fred Picker once told about showing his portfolio to a curator at a museum in New England. Fred photographed in the British Isles, near his home in Vermont and places far and wide, and trained his eye and lens on natural forms and man-made totems in nature. His favorite photographer was Paul Strand, though his photo collection ranged as far as his travels. In any case, in goes Fred to this curator, who quickly breezes through the images and dismisses the lot, saying, “We don’t need any more rocks and trees.”
Scanners & Printers
George Schaub Aug 18, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 5 comments
I took on this review assignment because I’ve had considerable history with printing, both silver and digital, and printing with Epson printers. Over the past few years this interest has led me on an odyssey through various printers, profiling, and a considerable amount of (early) frustration. My emphasis has been on monochrome printing and those who share in this interest and who have attempted black-and-white printing in the past understand the numerous obstacles it can present. Those include, but are not limited to, unwanted color casts, gloss differential in deep black areas and some tonal borders, poor deep black reproduction (accompanied by equally poor highlight repro), a lot of poor paper surfaces, and the hassle and waste of switching from matte black to photo glossy inks. Color printers face these as well, plus the challenges of color balance, casts, skin tone reproduction, highlight bias, green shadows, and more. Of late I have printed with the Epson Stylus Pro 3800, 3880, and 4800 models, the 3800 being my studio workhorse for years and the 3880 the model that many photo schools and workshops at which I’ve taught use as a mainstay student and production printer.
Vote
George Schaub Aug 17, 2011 13 comments
Briefly comment on why you make a specific choice on memory card speed and capacity (and for the latest updates on memory card tech check our Sept. 2011 issue).
What’s your choice on memory card capacity?
I use the biggest capacity I can so I don’t run out during a shoot.
29% (69 votes)
I just shoot low res JPEGs, so any reasonable card capacity will do.
2% (4 votes)
I like to keep it limited to a max 8GB and carry a few cards... just in case.
70% (168 votes)
Total votes: 241
George Schaub Aug 15, 2011 2 comments
The Sony NEX-C3 is an ultra compact CSC (compact system cameras) system with an APS-C sized sensor. The camera offers a resolution of 16 MP (megapixels), which is similar to some Sony SLT cameras like the SLT-A35. The main difference in the concept of the NEX cameras is the very compact body and the fact that the camera doesn’t work with an optical or electronic viewfinder, but only with the LCD screen on the back as viewfinder and control monitor.
George Schaub Aug 02, 2011 0 comments
The Panasonic GF3 is the successor of the GF2. The new camera is 17 percent smaller and 16 percent lighter than the GF2, making it an extremely compact camera. Due to the reduction of body dimensions there are some elements missing which were part of the GF2--no accessory shoe for external flash light systems and no interface for the optional ELV that could be mounted on the GF2.
George Schaub Jul 26, 2011 2 comments
Is This the Best Leica Digital Yet?

Having owned a (used) Leica M3 since the late 1970’s I can attest to the charms of working with a Leica camera. There is a certain heft and solidity of construction that speaks to its obvious longevity, which is juxtaposed with a deftness of operation, characteristics on display in the M3 in the stroke of the film advance lever and the sound and feel of the shutter release. For those who have experienced a Leica, that “aha that’s why” moment is quite unmatched by other cameras and it spoils you, in a way. Yet, working with a Leica for me has always had a certain awkwardness—witness the film loading in the M3, at least when compared with a sleek Nikon or Canon of the day, and the rangefinder focusing system, almost arcane in the world of autofocusing speed and accuracy. Yet, that awkwardness is not a true impediment and almost becomes part of the charm.

George Schaub Jul 19, 2011 2 comments
The Fujifilm Finepix X100 is designed like a classic viewfinder camera yet it offers state-of-the-art digital technology and some brand new and innovative systems. The Hybrid viewfinder, for example, is an example of a sophisticated enhancement of a classic concept. First of all, there’s a very bright and large optical viewfinder onto which the camera will overlay exposure information (aperture, shutter speed) and a parallax marker. Instead of using an optical system to create these overlay elements, as done in classic viewfinders of analog cameras, it uses a high resolution LCD. This results in detailed information and a very crisp look.