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Howard Millard Posted: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments

Epson Perfection 4870 Pro Quick Look
Scans a variety of films, prints and objects
Fits on any desktop
Fast scan time
$599 (4870 Pro), $449 (4870 Photo)

Howard Millard Posted: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments

Say the words "color management" and some digital photographers and printers break into a sweat. Others swear that what they don't know can't hurt them. But most believe that taking control of color management is essential to a...

Howard Millard Posted: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments

Are you ready to ramp up your photos with striking special effects? Web Euphoria (I love the name) offers more than 20 effects that you access from 19 plug-ins within Photoshop compatible programs such as Adobe Photoshop (Versions 2.5 through CS) and...

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Howard Millard Posted: Jun 01, 2004 0 comments

Are you looking for a way to make your digital photos really stand out? Starting with one of your existing color shots, here's a great way to create a dynamic new image that will really catch your viewer's eye. By combining a black and white...

Howard Millard Posted: Jun 01, 2004 0 comments

Are you ready to go beyond traditional borders? Whether you want to enhance your photos with photographic edges like film sprockets or a Polaroid transfer look, or you prefer to emulate traditional art media such as watercolor or charcoal, or your goal is to create out of this world digital...

Howard Millard Posted: May 01, 2004 0 comments

Where in the world is that wonderful shot you took last summer of Carolyn at the lake? And whatever happened to those great photos from the trip to Yellowstone that you want to e-mail to a friend? Whether your digital pictures are from a digital camera, scans from prints, negatives (or slides...

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Howard Millard Posted: Mar 01, 2004 1 comments

Do you backup your digital photos onto CD or DVD discs? Whether your digital pictures are JPEG or raw files from a digital camera, scans from prints, negatives, or slides, or corrected and enhanced versions saved in your image-editing software's...

Howard Millard Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Corel Painter, now in Version 8, has been among the world's top painting and drawing programs for more than a decade. So what does this mean for photographers? Painter 8 includes powerful, controllable commands to convert your photos to look like...

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Howard Millard Posted: Jul 26, 2005 0 comments


The
original photo, shot in the studio with Paul C. Buff electronic
flash on Fujichrome Sensia slide film, is sharp throughout.
Model: Heidi McAllister.

Photos 2002, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

In ads, book covers and magazines,
you've seen pictures where part of the subject jumps out at you
because it's sharp, but most of the image is way out of focus. The
technique really directs your attention to the part of the subject that's
sharp, and it adds a contemporary flair and sense of style. Traditionally,
this effect was achieved by using extremely shallow depth of field with
a medium format or large view camera. Today, however, you can create it
digitally in a few minutes and apply it to any existing photo made with
any camera, or to any print that you can scan into your computer.



I
selected the area I want to keep sharp with the Elliptical
Marquee selection tool.

Remember, once you've drawn the selection, you can
reposition it by dragging inside the selected area. Next,
feather the selection.

...

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Howard Millard Posted: Sep 27, 2005 0 comments


To
achieve the eerie, glowing effect of infrared black and
white film, I applied several techniques in Adobe Photoshop.

Photos © 2001, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

Are you attracted to the
mysterious, otherworldly glow of black and white infrared film? But
you've heard that it's a bit of a hassle to shoot and print.
Well, here's how to emulate that exotic infrared (IR) look digitally
starting with any color original.



Why not shoot IR film to begin with? Kodak High Speed Infrared film
is a challenge. First, to avoid fogging, it should be stored in the
refrigerator and must be loaded and unloaded in the darkroom or a changing
bag. Then, for the best effect, you must shoot with a deep red or opaque
filter over your lens. Once you've focused, you must re-focus
the lens manually to the infrared focus point. Since your camera meter
doesn't measure IR light, it's advisable to bracket exposures
widely. In the field, you must load and reload your camera in a light-tight
changing bag. After the film has been processed, the negatives are extremely
contrasty and often require extensive dodging and burning to get a good
print.



I
started with this original color 35mm slide shot on Fuji Sensia
II and scanned it on a Polaroid Sprintscan 35 Plus scanner
at 2700dpi for a 26MB file.

...

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