Howard Millard

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Howard Millard Posted: Jun 01, 2004 0 comments

Are you looking for a way to make your digital photos really stand out? Starting with one of your existing color shots, here's a great way to create a dynamic new image that will really catch your viewer's eye. By combining a black and white...

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Howard Millard Posted: Jun 01, 2004 0 comments

Are you ready to go beyond traditional borders? Whether you want to enhance your photos with photographic edges like film sprockets or a Polaroid transfer look, or you prefer to emulate traditional art media such as watercolor or charcoal, or your goal is to create out of this world digital...

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Howard Millard Posted: May 01, 2004 0 comments

Where in the world is that wonderful shot you took last summer of Carolyn at the lake? And whatever happened to those great photos from the trip to Yellowstone that you want to e-mail to a friend? Whether your digital pictures are from a digital camera, scans from prints, negatives (or slides...

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Howard Millard Posted: Mar 01, 2004 1 comments

Do you backup your digital photos onto CD or DVD discs? Whether your digital pictures are JPEG or raw files from a digital camera, scans from prints, negatives, or slides, or corrected and enhanced versions saved in your image-editing software's...

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Howard Millard Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Corel Painter, now in Version 8, has been among the world's top painting and drawing programs for more than a decade. So what does this mean for photographers? Painter 8 includes powerful, controllable commands to convert your photos to look like...

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Howard Millard Posted: Sep 27, 2005 0 comments


To
achieve the eerie, glowing effect of infrared black and
white film, I applied several techniques in Adobe Photoshop.

Photos © 2001, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

Are you attracted to the
mysterious, otherworldly glow of black and white infrared film? But
you've heard that it's a bit of a hassle to shoot and print.
Well, here's how to emulate that exotic infrared (IR) look digitally
starting with any color original.



Why not shoot IR film to begin with? Kodak High Speed Infrared film
is a challenge. First, to avoid fogging, it should be stored in the
refrigerator and must be loaded and unloaded in the darkroom or a changing
bag. Then, for the best effect, you must shoot with a deep red or opaque
filter over your lens. Once you've focused, you must re-focus
the lens manually to the infrared focus point. Since your camera meter
doesn't measure IR light, it's advisable to bracket exposures
widely. In the field, you must load and reload your camera in a light-tight
changing bag. After the film has been processed, the negatives are extremely
contrasty and often require extensive dodging and burning to get a good
print.



I
started with this original color 35mm slide shot on Fuji Sensia
II and scanned it on a Polaroid Sprintscan 35 Plus scanner
at 2700dpi for a 26MB file.

...

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Howard Millard Posted: Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

Could your portraits be enhanced
by the mysterious, otherworldly glow of a black and white infrared (IR) effect?
In the past, pre-digital darkroom, the only way you could get the IR look was
shooting special IR film, quite a challenge to expose, process, and print correctly.
Working digitally you can avoid many of the pitfalls and gain much more control
in the bargain. Here's how to emulate that exotic infrared look digitally:




You can start with a scan of any color slide, print, or negative you've
shot with your film camera or, even easier, with a color file from your digital
camera. If you're starting with a print, negative, or slide, scan it in
RGB color mode. Once you've got the digital file, open it in Adobe Photoshop
CS (or some earlier versions) to follow the steps outlined here. You can also
achieve the effect with Adobe Elements 2 or other advanced image-editing programs,
but the names of some tools or dialog boxes may be slightly different. Always
work on a copy to preserve your original scan. In fact, with this technique,
it is a good idea to make two or three copies in order to try different settings
in search of the effect you like best. Just follow these steps and you'll
be on your way to easy IR.

1.
I began with this original color file shot in Raw mode with a
Canon Digital Rebel 6-megapixel digital SLR with a Canon 18-55mm
lens at 55mm (equivalent to a 90mm lens in 35mm format). File
size: 18MB. (Model: Riley Messina.)

...

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Howard Millard Posted: May 29, 2007 0 comments

Workshop Spotlight

D-65 Seminars & Your Digital Workflow

by Howard Millard



For anyone shooting digitally today, there are an almost overwhelming number
of elements to keep track of: capture, downloading, color management, color
and tonal correction and enhancement, captioning, storage,backin...

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Howard Millard Posted: May 10, 2005 0 comments

Want to take one of your photos into the future? In a few steps, you can add
a cutting edge high tech look to your images with the Mosaic filter in Adobe
Photoshop or Elements. Whether you want to add this futuristic dynamism and
drama to a portrait or an object, simply follow the steps outlined here. I've
chosen to add it to a profile portrait of a young woman, but the technique can
be equally effective with objects such as a cell phone or even a shot of your
digital camera. The steps shown here are those I used in Photoshop CS, but Elements
has the same filter, as may some other image editors, perhaps with a different
name.

...

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