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Howard Millard Posted: Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

Could your portraits be enhanced
by the mysterious, otherworldly glow of a black and white infrared (IR) effect?
In the past, pre-digital darkroom, the only way you could get the IR look was
shooting special IR film, quite a challenge to expose, process, and print correctly.
Working digitally you can avoid many of the pitfalls and gain much more control
in the bargain. Here's how to emulate that exotic infrared look digitally:

You can start with a scan of any color slide, print, or negative you've
shot with your film camera or, even easier, with a color file from your digital
camera. If you're starting with a print, negative, or slide, scan it in
RGB color mode. Once you've got the digital file, open it in Adobe Photoshop
CS (or some earlier versions) to follow the steps outlined here. You can also
achieve the effect with Adobe Elements 2 or other advanced image-editing programs,
but the names of some tools or dialog boxes may be slightly different. Always
work on a copy to preserve your original scan. In fact, with this technique,
it is a good idea to make two or three copies in order to try different settings
in search of the effect you like best. Just follow these steps and you'll
be on your way to easy IR.

I began with this original color file shot in Raw mode with a
Canon Digital Rebel 6-megapixel digital SLR with a Canon 18-55mm
lens at 55mm (equivalent to a 90mm lens in 35mm format). File
size: 18MB. (Model: Riley Messina.)


Filed under
Howard Millard Posted: May 29, 2007 0 comments

Workshop Spotlight

D-65 Seminars & Your Digital Workflow

by Howard Millard

For anyone shooting digitally today, there are an almost overwhelming number
of elements to keep track of: capture, downloading, color management, color
and tonal correction and enhancement, captioning, storage,backin...

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Howard Millard Posted: May 10, 2005 0 comments

Want to take one of your photos into the future? In a few steps, you can add
a cutting edge high tech look to your images with the Mosaic filter in Adobe
Photoshop or Elements. Whether you want to add this futuristic dynamism and
drama to a portrait or an object, simply follow the steps outlined here. I've
chosen to add it to a profile portrait of a young woman, but the technique can
be equally effective with objects such as a cell phone or even a shot of your
digital camera. The steps shown here are those I used in Photoshop CS, but Elements
has the same filter, as may some other image editors, perhaps with a different


Filed under
Howard Millard Posted: Jul 26, 2005 0 comments


It was the swinging `60s,
I was in college, and many wore a rainbow of tie-dyed colors. What had
been "normal" was being challenged on every front, and that
included photography. The bulging, startling perspective of the fisheye
lens added an otherworldly look to album covers for rock musicians like
Jimi Hendrix and Cream. Now, decades later, just as bell bottom pants
recently returned for yet another cycle, fisheye images have again reared
their heads in both print and television ads. A fisheye lens, of course,
is one that takes in an extremely wide angle of view, often 180º,
and appears as a circle within the black image frame. Yes, there are rectilinear
full frame fisheyes (which give a rectangular, not round image), but to
my mind, they're merely ultra-wide angle lenses. A true fisheye,
on the other hand, is a unique special effects tool which renders a unique
circular perspective of the world.

When I was a student, fisheye lenses cost a small fortune (some still
do). What to do? I drilled a hole in the center of a lens cap and glued
a brass door peephole from a hardware store to it. Snapping the lens cap/fisheye
lens over a 50mm or wider angle standard lens, I got a small 180º
circular fisheye image in the center of the black frame. Quality was not
great, but the effect was spectacular.


Filed under
Howard Millard Posted: Jun 26, 2007 0 comments

Learn how to shoot striking panoramas like this at Howard Millard's

Filed under
Howard Millard Posted: Jan 31, 2006 0 comments

Xenofex 2 Special
Effects Plug-Ins

Electrify And Enliven
Your Photos


Filed under
Howard Millard Posted: Jun 07, 2005 0 comments

#1. Starting with an original single image photo shot
in the studio, I selected the subject with the Magic Wand
tool. (Model: Tanya Perez.)


Filed under
Howard Millard Posted: Sep 27, 2005 0 comments


Photos © 2003, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

Adding a reflection of your
subject can double the impact of your digital photo, transforming an
ordinary shot into something memorable and striking. Using tools in
Adobe Photoshop, Elements, and other image-editing programs, it's
not too difficult to double your pixel power. Just follow these nine
steps. I used Photoshop, and the procedure is similar in Elements or
other programs.



Filed under
Howard Millard Posted: Nov 28, 2005 0 comments

Sometimes all it takes to lift your photo from the ordinary to the extraordinary
is a striking edge or border. Would a soft-edged vignette or a unique pattern
border take your image to the next level of dramatic impact? While there are
myriad software programs and plug-ins designed to add special effect edges,
borders and frames, you probably already have quite an array of possibilities
built into your current image-editing software. To get you started, here are
some effects that I created with Adobe Photoshop. You can use Elements for these,
as well. Earlier versions of these as well as other image-editing programs offer
many of the same effects. Now let's give some photos a new leading edge...



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