George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 22, 2011 Published: May 01, 2011 1 comments
Image processing has always been an important facet of photography, even in these post-film days. Indeed, even working from film, most photographers now go the scan route so that all images get poured through the digital funnel as they make their way to print and online. While we often run processing technique articles that concentrate on Adobe Photoshop, the reviews here feature other products that pose an alternative to that most impressive program and that might just handle many of your conversion, manipulation, and editing needs. It is rare these days that one software package can do it all, and many exciting programs are available that offer unique ways for you to work your images.
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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2011 7 comments

In the report on the Canon PowerShot G11 (April, 2010, available at www.shutterbug.com) I concluded by saying that it was “an excellent traveling companion.” Ditto on the new G12 ($499, MSRP), the latest iteration of the Canon “G” line of integral lens cameras aimed at the photo enthusiast. In fact, you could ditto many of the form, function, and features of the G12 with the G11, so I will not...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2011 0 comments

Throughout the years we have paid close attention to the business side of photography, featuring tips and words of wisdom from working pros in Maria Piscopo’s Business Trends column, Jack Neubart’s Pro’s Choice column, and numerous articles on wedding, portrait, stock, event, and other venues in which photographers, both full- and part-time, share their experiences on how they...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2011 0 comments

Having flown my fair share of miles in the last few months I have come to appreciate a roller bag that can be used to carry camera gear, be carried on or checked, and that can help and not hinder the trip. I have gone from using a camera backpack loaded inside a standard roller suitcase (just to get from the airport to the destination) to leaving home gear that I later regretted not bringing...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2011 2 comments

The substrate and the image often go hand in hand, with a natural tendency to choose a matte surface for one type of scene, bucolic landscapes, perhaps, a hard gloss for commercial work, and a luster for deep blacks and a fine art feel.

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2011 2 comments

Many photographers start their careers photographing weddings or doing portraits “on the side.” Me, too. While I was engaged in other aspects of the craft, I worked as a weekend warrior shooting weddings and social events to help raise money for new gear (and pay the rent). I set up a small studio with seamless paper on rolls in my one-bedroom apartment and would do tabletop...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2011 1 comments

At first glance you might think that Alien Skin’s Exposure 3 ($249 at www.alienskin.com/store or $99 upgrade from Exposure 1 or 2; a free trial is available on their website as well) is a push-button solution to image manipulation.

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2011 1 comments

OK, so I have on the meditation tape and have done my breathing exercises and now I’m ready to print on Hahnemühle’s Bamboo paper, which they dub prime for “spiritual black and white and color photography.” Made from 90 percent bamboo fibers and 10 percent cotton, and washed in “pure spring water,” the paper comes with a bit of New Age hype but at the end...

George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2011 3 comments

No, that’s not a typo—the “T” in the acronym refers to the new mirror system in the Sony alpha a55 and stands for “translucent.”...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2011 0 comments

Every digital image starts out as a color image, an RGB that, when shot in Raw format and loaded as a 16-bit file, contains millions of color and brightness codes. These codes, or pixel addresses, can be manipulated in many ways using presets or “manual” adjustments to create looks that range from “true” to highly stylistic interpretations of the content within the image.

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