George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 11, 2011 Published: Jun 01, 2011 0 comments
Photography and travel have always been intertwined. Ever since photography was invented photographers have been exploring the world, both locally and globally, with images. The camera becomes motivator and instigator, witness and commentator, of the social, natural, and wondrous sites that surround us. And while many of the articles and images in this issue deal with particular projects undertaken by a wide range of photographers, there’s no reason to think you have to travel far and wide to discover what that magical combination of camera and travel can do for you.
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George Schaub Posted: Jul 07, 2011 Published: Jun 01, 2011 1 comments

Inkjet printmakers have nothing to complain about when it comes to paper choices. There are glossy, semigloss, and matte surface papers galore, each with their own charm and cachet. Regarding the latter aspect, Somerset is no slouch, having established a reputation in both inkjet and other art papers many years back.

Their latest entry into the inkjet market is Somerset Museum Rag, distributed by Moab. This 100 percent cotton, 300 gsm paper displays a smooth matte surface, a considerable, but not yellowish warm tone, and while strong and fairly thick, is actually quite supple. The paper is single-sided, which means the tooth is on one side only, and telling the printable from the backing side is not something that will be immediately apparent. For that reason the packaging comes with a stick-on label that says “printable THIS SIDE.” You would do well to keep the original cellophane packaging until you get a good feel for the surfaces. I found that if you rub your thumb along the surface the differences become clear, with the printable surface evoking somewhat of a higher pitch.

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 22, 2011 Published: May 01, 2011 1 comments
Image processing has always been an important facet of photography, even in these post-film days. Indeed, even working from film, most photographers now go the scan route so that all images get poured through the digital funnel as they make their way to print and online. While we often run processing technique articles that concentrate on Adobe Photoshop, the reviews here feature other products that pose an alternative to that most impressive program and that might just handle many of your conversion, manipulation, and editing needs. It is rare these days that one software package can do it all, and many exciting programs are available that offer unique ways for you to work your images.
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George Schaub Posted: Jun 13, 2011 Published: May 01, 2011 1 comments
For those who thought that we here at Shutterbug were inalterably attached to our Macs, the chance to work with a PC, albeit a very fast and upper-price range one at that, was something we did not want to pass up, if only to dispel our own notions about crossing the OS Rubicon. The new HP EliteBook 8540w we worked with came with 8GB of RAM and a 320GB hard drive, more connection slots than we ever could wish for, a Blu-ray reader/writer, a download card slot for SD memory cards (with adapters available for CF, etc.), microphone, image out slots to a projector, HDMI, and more. As configured the unit runs close to $3100, although we’ve seen lesser-priced units of the same model with more modest attributes. This is close to what you’d pay for a MacBook Pro similarly configured, albeit minus Blu-ray and various slots but plus a larger screen. But our aim was not to put it head to head against the latest MacBook Pro, but to check it out on its own merits. That said, in terms of size and weight it is similar to the 15” Mac in many respects (the HP being 9.9x14.7x1.3” and weighing in at 6.5 lbs with a 15.6” display) so there’s no plus and minus in portability here.
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George Schaub Posted: Jun 15, 2011 Published: May 01, 2011 0 comments
Remote viewing and shutter release capability opens up a host of picture opportunities, from working high atop camera platforms from ground level to very low-level shooting without muddying your clothes (given your camera lacks an articulating monitor) to placing your camera in spots and being able to view and shoot without your being right behind the viewfinder. Many photographers routinely work with radio triggers for flash, especially in studio environments where the lights are set in position and photographer and model or subject move. The Hähnel Inspire adds to the mix with remote shutter release and viewing in one.
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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2011 0 comments

Having flown my fair share of miles in the last few months I have come to appreciate a roller bag that can be used to carry camera gear, be carried on or checked, and that can help and not hinder the trip. I have gone from using a camera backpack loaded inside a standard roller suitcase (just to get from the airport to the destination) to leaving home gear that I later regretted not bringing...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2011 8 comments

In the report on the Canon PowerShot G11 (April, 2010, available at www.shutterbug.com) I concluded by saying that it was “an excellent traveling companion.” Ditto on the new G12 ($499, MSRP), the latest iteration of the Canon “G” line of integral lens cameras aimed at the photo enthusiast. In fact, you could ditto many of the form, function, and features of the G12 with the G11, so I will not...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2011 0 comments

Throughout the years we have paid close attention to the business side of photography, featuring tips and words of wisdom from working pros in Maria Piscopo’s Business Trends column, Jack Neubart’s Pro’s Choice column, and numerous articles on wedding, portrait, stock, event, and other venues in which photographers, both full- and part-time, share their experiences on how they...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2011 1 comments

At first glance you might think that Alien Skin’s Exposure 3 ($249 at www.alienskin.com/store or $99 upgrade from Exposure 1 or 2; a free trial is available on their website as well) is a push-button solution to image manipulation.

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2011 2 comments

The substrate and the image often go hand in hand, with a natural tendency to choose a matte surface for one type of scene, bucolic landscapes, perhaps, a hard gloss for commercial work, and a luster for deep blacks and a fine art feel.

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