Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Staff Posted: Mar 04, 2009 0 comments

As part of the flagship Performance Series of COOLPIX cameras, the P90 offers new features that include a 24x Optical Zoom, a new 3.0-inch vari-angle LCD monitor with tilt function and anti-reflection coating; and 15 frame-per-second (fps) high-speed capability (up to 45 frames).  The key to the versatility of the P90 is its 24x Optical Wide Angle Zoom-NIKKOR ED Glass Lens. This lens offers wide angle (26mm) to super telephoto coverage (624mm).

...

Filed under
Staff Posted: Apr 15, 2009 0 comments

Nikon Inc. has introduced the D5000, a digital SLR camera with a 12.3-megapixel sensor, a versatile 2.7-inch Vari-angle LCD monitor, Nikon’s revolutionary D-Movie Mode and expanded automatic Scene Modes. Photographers can easily compose images on the Vari-angle LCD monitor that they can view in a normal position fitting securely within the camera back, or swung out to be rotated or tilted. The monitor can also be stowed with the LCD panel tucked against the camera back to protect the screen when not in use.

This freedom of movement, along with four Live View autofocus shooting modes, affords users the opportunity to shoot from a multitude of imaginative angles. Easy one-button Live View activation now features Subject Tracking autofocus (AF), which automatically locks onto a moving subject.  Even if the subject leaves the frame and returns, Subject Tracking AF maintains focus. In addition to Subject Tracking AF in Live View, the D5000 features Face Priority AF, which automatically detects up to five faces in a scene and focuses on the closest subject; Wide Area AF, which offers a large AF area for optimal hand-held shooting; and Normal Area AF, which provides pinpoint accuracy when shooting with a tripod.

The D5000’s D-Movie Mode allows users the ability to record HD movie clips (1280 x 720) at a cinematic 24 frames per second with sound. Additionally, the D5000 is compatible with a comprehensive assortment of AF-S NIKKOR interchangeable lenses to provide users with the ability to capture perspectives not possible with typical consumer video recording devices. When using any NIKKOR VR lens, D-Movie clips benefit from Nikon VR image stabilization, which automatically activates during recording to deliver added sharpness and image stability. VR image stabilization also extends the D5000’s performance in low-light situations. D-Movie clips are recorded onto an inserted SD or SDHC memory card and saved as Motion JPEG AVI files for easy editing with widely available video editing software.

19 automatic Scene Modes are said to free users to capture beautiful images without having to manually adjust camera settings. The broad range of automatic Scene Modes includes Sports, Portrait, Candlelight, Silhouette, Autumn Colors and more, The D5000 also incorporates a comprehensive set of in-camera editing features to make the most of captured images without the need of a computer. The D5000 also introduces several new Retouch features, including a Soft Filter effect, which applies a smooth appearance to faces or the entire image; Perspective Control, which helps correct distortions in perspective often encountered in photographs of architecture; and Color Outline, which creates monochrome outlines of objects in images by eliminating color and tonal gradations. The D5000 saves each of these edited images as a separate JPEG file, ensuring the original image is left unmodified.  With Nikon’s exclusive Picture Control Settings, photographers can quickly select various image appearance profiles that include Standard, Neutral, Vivid, Monochrome, Portrait and Landscape settings.  In addition, Picture Control provides the ability to create and store up to nine user-defined custom profiles to reflect each user’s personal preferences for hue, color saturation and image sharpening.

Extensive playback options allow users to review their photos in groups of four, nine, or 72 thumbnail images. Alternatively, users can select the Calendar View to easily group and select images by date. These playback features can be viewed either on the Vari-angle LCD or an HDTV with HDMI connectivity available via a dedicated HDMI port on the camera.

The D5000’s normal ISO range extends from ISO 200 to 3200, allowing for superior shooting in low-light conditions. Additionally, the D5000’s ISO range can be expanded to a Lo 1 setting of ISO 100 or a Hi 1 setting of ISO 6400, furthering the opportunities for previously impossible shots.

Nikon’s exclusive 3D Color Matrix Metering II, in conjunction with the EXPEED image processing system, contributes to the D5000’s ability to capture quality images by instantly evaluating the exposure elements of each scene and comparing it to an onboard database of information from more than 30,000 images. These split-second calculations allow the D5000 to ensure the right exposure—even when conditions are extreme.  To push creative boundaries even further, the D5000 allows picture-takers to also use Center-Weighted and Spot metering for added personal control.

The D5000’s 11-point auto focus system utilizes Nikon’s exclusive Scene Recognition System with Face Detection to help create the best possible images in a variety of shooting environments. Nikon's 11-point AF offers best-in-class speed and accuracy, helping to ensure sharp focus, shot-after-shot. Single-point AF is suggested for static subjects, Dynamic-area AF for moving subjects, Auto-area AF for spontaneous shooting and 3D-tracking with 11 AF points for maintaining accurate focus on a subject moving throughout the frame.

Paired with Nikon’s AF-S NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR image stabilization lens and the ability to shoot at four frames per second, the D5000 easily captures moments other cameras miss. Nikon’s VR image stabilization lenses reduce the blurring in images due to camera shake, allowing photographers to shoot hand-held at as many as three full stops slower than would otherwise be possible.

The new D5000 also features the innovative Integrated Dust Reduction System, which offers both an electronic sensor cleaning when the camera is powered on and/or off and the Airflow Control System, which directs dust away from the sensor with every snap of the shutter. These functions work to clear image-degrading dust from the sensor’s optical low-pass filter, helping to ensure spot-free images. In addition, the D5000 features a Quiet Release Mode that reduces the mirror cycling noise for discreet shooting in sensitive situations, such as weddings and other ceremonies.

Photographers can also appreciate the D5000’s system expandability, as the camera can work in conjunction with a variety of Nikon accessories including a broad assortment of NIKKOR AF-S interchangeable lenses.  While the D5000 offers a versatile built-in flash, the camera is also compatible with Nikon’s Creative Lighting System and capable of Advanced Wireless Lighting when using the SB-900 Speedlight or the SU-800 Wireless Commander. For those looking to document their photo excursions with geo-tagging, the D5000 is compatible with the optional GP-1 GPS Unit, which automatically records latitude, longitude, altitude and time information when a picture is taken.

The D5000 also works seamlessly with Nikon’s powerful Capture NX 2 image editing software (available for purchase separately), for more advanced photographers seeking greater control over their post-capture images.  Capture NX 2 simplifies the path to beautiful images with easy-to-learn editing tools and a highly versatile and elegantly simple interface, which streamline editing procedures.

Price and Availability
The D5000 outfit, which includes the AF-S NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR lens, will be available at Nikon Authorized dealers beginning in late April 2009 at an estimated selling price of $849.95.  For consumers who want to configure their D5000 system or for photographers who need an additional D-SLR body for an existing system, the D5000 will also be offered as a body only for an estimated selling price of $729.95. For more information, please visit www.nikonusa.com.

...

Filed under
Staff Posted: Oct 18, 2012 Published: Nov 01, 2012 3 comments
On The Cover
In this month’s issue we explore the travel photography market with a candid conversation with pros who earn their living from it. We also look at the gear side of travel with two handy guides to roller cases and “compact folder” tripods. We also have reviews on a nice macro flash setup, an affordable printer, and a dynamic matte surface printing paper. Our cover photo was taken by Karen I. Hirsch. You can see more of her work at: www.karenihirsch.com.

Filed under
Staff Posted: Oct 17, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments
In this issue we look at travel and nature photography with an emphasis on ops and issues in the colder regions. Covered gear this month includes a clever tripod kit, a new EOS Rebel, a fast Tamron zoom, and software for retouch and black-and-white magic.
Filed under
Staff Posted: Oct 17, 2011 Published: Nov 01, 2011 1 comments
November 2011

On The Cover
This month we feature lighting tools, techniques, and tips from pros covering new gear, new lighting options, and some great lighting setups and ideas. Each of our product reviews contain tips as well and can help you decide which type of setup is best for the type of images you want to create. We cover lighting accessories as well, those modifiers that can help you make creative lighting decisions that bring a unique look to every image. Finally, we cover the wide range of wireless TTL lighting systems that can free you to make great shots in the studio, or on location. Our cover shot, by Lindsay Adler, shows just the kind of great effects you can achieve using the gear and tips featured in this special issue.

Filed under
Staff Posted: Apr 27, 2009 0 comments

The QuadroPod introduced by Novoflex is a four-leg tripod system.  The foundation of this system is a totally new design for a tripod collar that - thanks to its modular construction - can be equipped with different leg variations. Aluminum or carbon legs with 3 or 4 sections are available. Working heights from 2.8“ up to 70.9“ are possible with the current leg types. Moreover, additional leg types are under development, enabling working heights up to 91“. In addition, the different leg versions can be combined with each other and supplemented with clips/clamps, suction and screw-in-items from the Novoflex program.

...

Filed under
Staff Posted: Sep 14, 2012 Published: Oct 01, 2012 0 comments
On The Cover
This month we have two points of view on how to make money with your camera—a successful stock photographer tells our reporter about her business, and Maria Piscopo gets the lowdown on today’s calendar and greeting card markets from a panel of pros. We also get an inside look on sports photography from two pros who share their very unique points of view. For more on photo business, just type “Business Trends” into the Search box at www.shutterbug.com.

Filed under
Staff Posted: Sep 10, 2013 Published: Oct 01, 2013 0 comments
On The Cover
In this issue we share the work of a number of photographers with a unique point of view on the world, as well as the exciting and challenging work of “pro bono” photographers. We also have some lighting tests, a report on an exciting new medium format scanner, and Image Tech reports on unique cameras from Canon and Nikon.

Filed under
Staff Posted: Sep 15, 2011 Published: Oct 01, 2011 8 comments
October CoverOn The Cover
Renowned photographer Steve McCurry shot our cover image of a Rabari girl on the last roll of Kodachrome film ever manufactured. We are privileged to share with you the final frames taken with this beloved film. To see more of Steve’s images, turn to page 122. Aside from Kodachrome’s last windup, we have news about the Polaroid Collection of images being saved thanks to the Impossible Project and WestLicht Museum of Photography. In addition, we have D-SLR tests on the Canon EOS 60D and the Pentax K-5, plus an extensive roundup on backdrops and a lighting test on Booth Photographic’s parabolic umbrellas.

Filed under
Staff Posted: Oct 11, 2012 Published: Sep 01, 2012 1 comments
After a long morning shoot throughout Death Valley National Park my wife and I found ourselves at Furnace Creek at the Borax Museum. She was intent on going inside the museum but I spotted old equipment outside that previously had been used in mining operations. Being a strict nature photographer I am normally not attracted to architectural venues or mechanical subjects. But on further examination I found the afternoon light to be pleasing, casting interesting contrasts between the illuminated equipment and shadows. I was particularly attracted to this old rusty train locomotive, one of two engines previously used in Death Valley on the narrow-gauge railroad extant during the borax mining era.

Pages