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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Aug 19, 2014 0 comments

HDR stands for High Dynamic Range. What this refers to is the digital sensor’s ability (or lack of ability) to render good detail in both the highlights and the shadows in a photograph. Our eye/brain combination is extremely sophisticated, and as we look at a contrasty scene (such as a landscape in noon sunlight) the detail in the shadows and in the bright sunny areas is quite clear to us. A photograph will not look the same as we see it.

Jim Zuckerman Posted: Aug 24, 2015 0 comments

Some photographers feel that the photograph you capture in camera is the final image. Today, with the advent of the Raw digital format, most photographers can’t get away from applying post-capture processing techniques to their images since, by definition, the format is an unprocessed one. Some Raw files need very little work while others require more time and effort. Since my exposure and white balance was set accurately in the field, little was needed in the processing of these 2 elephant seals (#1).

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Aug 01, 2010 0 comments

Digital technology has revolutionized photography. So much has changed. The terminology is different, the ability to make our images perfect after the fact is a new concept, and the instant gratification of seeing our photos in a microsecond allows us to correct our mistakes on the fly. At the same time, the digital world is fraught with challenges, and photographers have never had to deal with...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Mar 25, 2014 0 comments
There are two ways to travel. You can go with a group or you can travel independently where you plan the itinerary and make the arrangements. One isn’t necessarily less expensive than the other because it depends on so many factors, but the main issue to consider is this: what will you gain by being part of a group versus traveling alone or with a friend or spouse?
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: May 28, 2014 1 comments
I have always been fascinated by a photographer’s ability to turn a common subject into a work of art. Being a photographer means seeing the artistic potential in the elements that surround us on a daily basis. I travel all over the world seeking out amazing things to shoot, but I also find them at home—in the kitchen, in my backyard or even in my office. It’s always an exciting discovery to work with a subject to which I never gave a second thought, and then one day it turns into something that is visually arresting.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

One of the things that makes a photograph successful is that attention is directed to the subject. This can be done with good lighting, muted backgrounds, or graphic design. An important design element that directs our attention into the heart of a picture is called a leading line. This is a line that usually begins at the bottom of the composition and extends into the heart of the scene...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 27, 2014 0 comments

Every photographer has a personal vision and a particular taste in composition, light, color and so on. For example, many photographers chose nature’s details simply to abstract the color and form they find. Others like to use extremely shallow depth of field—also called selective focus—so only a sliver of the subject is sharp while the rest of it is soft. People who are intrigued by the beauty, intricacy and complexity of nature usually shoot with the opposite approach. They want to reveal as much detail in the subjects as possible so those who view their work can appreciate the designs and the patterns in the images with tack sharp clarity.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Dec 01, 2001 0 comments

My favorite season for nature photography is winter. The air is crystal clear, trees often stark, graphic forms against a background of dazzling whiteness, and the profound quiet and solitude of a frigid day in the wild can be an overwhelming...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Mar 27, 2015 0 comments
Shadows are an integral part of light, and that means they are an integral part of photography. Everything casts a shadow, however subtle it may be, in virtually all types of lighting conditions. Even a small insect casts a shadow in diffused light. For example, look at the shadows under the legs of the cicada (#1). This was taken with diffused window light.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Nov 20, 2015 0 comments
In nature, lighting can make the difference between an okay photo and an amazing shot. Light can even become the subject and can affect composition, exposure, color, focus, feel and mood. This is why most nature photographers work around light, letting it determine when and where they work. In this chapter I’ll talk about the importance of shooting at the right time of day, how the direction of light affects subject matter and how weather plays an essential part.

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