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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 27, 2014 0 comments

The problem with making the right exposures in low light environments is that exposure meters, in-camera and hand held, are not particularly suited for the task. Light meters were designed to read subjects in normal daylight situations or in bright interiors. The meter will deliver a good exposure under these “normal” conditions, but low light photography is anything but normal. There is either a lack of light, many dark areas, very high contrast or all of these combined.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Feb 18, 2015 0 comments
I think it would be helpful to you if I explained how I handled different kinds of low light photographic situations. Apply my approach to your own images and make note of the technical solutions for each subject and scene. As photographers we are constantly challenged with shooting in circumstances where the light is not sufficient to get what we really want—sharp pictures, effective depth of field, minimal noise and a good exposure. We often have to make compromises but our goal is to get the best images we can under often trying conditions. In this chapter I’ll be sharing my thinking process in dealing with tough subjects in a variety of circumstances.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Nov 20, 2015 0 comments

Low light photography presents many challenges, but like any challenging situation it also opens up opportunities to create unique images. Think outside the box and you will be surprised at the kind of images you can produce. The techniques I describe below will get you started. Try each one and see why there is no limit to what you can create with some imagination and effort, and have some fun in the bargain.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Nov 24, 2014 0 comments
Capturing the details in nature requires getting close to small subjects and sometimes you will want to use flash. Shooting close-ups with flash is very different than using flash as you normally do.

The biggest problem we face when using the built-in flash or even a small hotshoe mounted accessory flash for macro work is that a flash sits no more than 6 or 7” above the lens. This means it will illuminate the top of a subject, leaving the middle and bottom portions in shadow. There’s no way the light can be dispersed over the insect, small flower, feather or whatever you might be shooting because it doesn’t have enough distance to do that.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Dec 24, 2014 0 comments

Capturing the details in nature requires getting close to small subjects and sometimes you will want to use flash. Shooting close-ups with flash is very different than using flash as you normally do.

Jim Zuckerman Posted: Dec 28, 2015 0 comments

Nature photography may encompass grand landscapes or large wild animals, but it can also incorporate the smallest of objects. There is an entire delicate world of light, beauty, color and form in macro photography. Wonders that can be documented while on vacation on a tropical island, in a national park or even in your backyard. I have spent mornings lying in a bed of wildflowers, moving no more than a few feet, recording everything from the dew on a spider web to the shape of a purple iris. I am often surprised and rarely disappointed.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Mar 25, 2014 0 comments
I have long been intrigued with kaleidoscopic images, but it’s virtually impossible to photograph into a traditional kaleidoscope because the hole through which you look to see the beautiful designs is too small. Several years ago I figured out how to construct a kaleidoscope that would permit photography, and I’ve always had a lot of fun with it. The cost is around $5-$10, and it can be put together in just a few minutes.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Dec 11, 2012 0 comments
If this were a perfect world, ice cream would be good for you, celery would be fattening, and camera manufacturers would arrange the controls on all flash units in the same place. It’s too bad on all accounts.

Even though portable flash units have buttons and dials in different places, the basic functions of the various features are the same. In this section, I will go over them and explain when to use them. You will probably need to consult the manual that came with your flash to identify where the features I discuss reside on your unit. Whenever you travel away from home, it’s a good idea to have this manual with you because if you don’t use a function for a while, it’s easy to forget where it is and how to use it.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Nov 16, 2011 0 comments
Combining color with black and white is a way to focus attention on a subject or one aspect of a picture. This is similar to throwing a background out of focus so our concentration is directed to the in-focus part of an image, or placing a black background behind something so we have nothing else to look at except the subject. You make one area of a picture color and convert the rest of it to black and white, and it is a very unique way to direct a viewer’s attention where you want it.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Dec 15, 2011 4 comments
Monochromatic color themes have been around since the inception of photography. Toning black and white prints with a sepia toner was begun at a time when photographers could only dream of color. The noxious fumes made the darkroom work memorable, to say the least. With digital technology, we can get the same look of a toned print. When I first started learning Photoshop, I translated my knowledge of the darkroom into the digital world. In other words, I learned how to create in the computer the same effects that I had been creating in the darkroom.

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