Jack Neubart

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 23, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2011 37 comments
It isn’t often that as a camera reviewer you get the chance to test a camera with the technical experts right at hand, but that’s how I got to know the Phase One 645DF and IQ160 back. Actually, I attended one of the company’s Phase One Digital Artists Series workshops in Chicago with other photographers (see PODAS workshops sidebar for further info on this and other workshops the company is offering). Beyond the guided portion of the workshop, we were given time to go off and work with the camera at our own pace. It didn’t take long to find my comfort zone with the new IQ system. By the end of day one, I had a working familiarity with the camera and back and hardly paid attention to the big bundle I was hefting. Although I often felt quite at ease shooting handheld, for night photography and some other occasions I did employ my trusty Benbo tripod, with the camera seated on a Foba Superball M-2 on one day, an Acratech GP-L ball head on another.
Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2009 2 comments

On the surface, the Phase One 645 AF medium format D-SLR is the identical twin to the Mamiya 645AFD III, albeit with the Phase One logo.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

I’ve looked at and worked with many photo backpacks over the years. But when a new one comes along that looks more useful and comfy for short hops around town, traveling, or serious hiking, I have to try it out. Which brings me to the latest crop of camera backpacks from Adorama, Delsey, HPRC, Kata, Lowepro, Naneu Pro, Tamrac, and Tenba. These packs represent both incremental changes and...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 01, 2010 0 comments

I’ve seen more innovative camera backpacks in recent months than in the past five years. One innovation encompasses truly ergonomic designs aimed at providing hours of comfort.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 02, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 6 comments
Before buying a photo backpack or sling bag for that photo safari or vacation, consider how you’re getting there, how you’ll get around once you arrive, and what you plan to photograph. Will you be flying commercial or hopping a puddle jumper? Do you anticipate being on foot most of the time or traveling largely by car, jeep, or bus? Do you expect to encounter rugged terrain and steep trails? Will you need fast optics and long zooms for wildlife, a macro for close-ups, a wide zoom for landscapes, and perhaps a speedlight and ring flash?
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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2002 0 comments

Everyone involved in digital printing cannot stress strongly enough the importance of using good-quality inks and media, especially when it comes to printing pictures of true photographic quality. In the case of ink jet printers, we begin, where a choice for our printer indeed exists, by choosing the...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

Remember the old Kodak 18 percent Gray Card that we used as a neutral target to determine exposure, without undue influence from bright and dark tones? I still have a bunch of those lying around. There were several problems with the card; holding it the wrong way might cause a glaring hot spot. Second, it was cardboard, not built to last. Third, it didn't travel...

Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 27, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 0 comments
The Phottix Odin is a radio frequency-controlled system, or simply radio remote. The basic package includes two units: a transmitter and a receiver. Additional receivers are optional. You only need one transmitter to sit in the camera’s hot shoe and trigger compatible i-TTL strobes, but you need a receiver for each off-camera flash. And recently, Phottix introduced a new combo pack that includes one additional receiver—perfect for my two-speedlight setups. The unit tested here is for Nikon and I worked with my Nikon SB-900 speedlights.
Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 20, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 4 comments
Slik introduced the first pistol grip over 25 years ago, heralding an innovative adaptation of the ball socket head. Still in production, that head has not changed, but today there are numerous variations on this basic design. Several are fashioned along the lines of a video game joystick. Two other types included here are the collar lock ball head and what I call the “vice grip” head.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

While camera bags often aim for functionality over style, there were several shoulder bags shown this year that had fashion chic paramount in their design, and a number of them aimed at the female photo enthusiast. Still, the photo backpack seemed to dominate when it came to functionality and innovative design, including two combo packs targeting the hard-core backpacker or...

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