Jack Neubart

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

Small is big--at least among PSDs (Portable Storage Devices). That can be the defining motif for the strong emergence at this year's PMA of smaller and smaller digital portable storage devices with higher and higher capacities and enhanced feature sets. These devices cropped up at every turn, never failing to grab my attention.

They include hard...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

It's not often a camera like the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ comes along.
But when it does, it thankfully arrives in several flavors to suit various tastes,
in 4-, and 5-Mp versions, priced at $499 (DMC-FZ15), and $599 (DMC-FZ20), respectively.




For starters, what makes the Lumix FZ stand out is the Leica DC Vario-Elmarit
6-72mm/12x optical zoom lens, which translates into 36-432mm, in 35mm parlance.
More astounding still is the maximum aperture: f/2.8, which defines a fast lens
for this zoom range, one eminently suited to low-light situations. As if that
weren't enough, optical image stabilization should help when shooting
in subdued light at relatively long shutter speeds, a key feature we'll
be testing.

...
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Jack Neubart Posted: Feb 01, 2010 1 comments

Micro Four Thirds format cameras promise of compact size, reduced weight, and versatility approaching a D-SLR. I recently had the opportunity to work with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 to see how it fulfilled those ambitions.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

While the latest generation of ink jet printers continue to astound us with their enhanced printing technologies, ink jet media--primarily papers--do not fail to grab our attention for one reason or another. While the industry still has not firmly established a uniform testing standard across international lines (British paper manufacturers, for instance, adhere to...

Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 23, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2011 43 comments
It isn’t often that as a camera reviewer you get the chance to test a camera with the technical experts right at hand, but that’s how I got to know the Phase One 645DF and IQ160 back. Actually, I attended one of the company’s Phase One Digital Artists Series workshops in Chicago with other photographers (see PODAS workshops sidebar for further info on this and other workshops the company is offering). Beyond the guided portion of the workshop, we were given time to go off and work with the camera at our own pace. It didn’t take long to find my comfort zone with the new IQ system. By the end of day one, I had a working familiarity with the camera and back and hardly paid attention to the big bundle I was hefting. Although I often felt quite at ease shooting handheld, for night photography and some other occasions I did employ my trusty Benbo tripod, with the camera seated on a Foba Superball M-2 on one day, an Acratech GP-L ball head on another.
Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2009 2 comments

On the surface, the Phase One 645 AF medium format D-SLR is the identical twin to the Mamiya 645AFD III, albeit with the Phase One logo.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

I’ve looked at and worked with many photo backpacks over the years. But when a new one comes along that looks more useful and comfy for short hops around town, traveling, or serious hiking, I have to try it out. Which brings me to the latest crop of camera backpacks from Adorama, Delsey, HPRC, Kata, Lowepro, Naneu Pro, Tamrac, and Tenba. These packs represent both incremental changes and...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 01, 2010 0 comments

I’ve seen more innovative camera backpacks in recent months than in the past five years. One innovation encompasses truly ergonomic designs aimed at providing hours of comfort.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 02, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 6 comments
Before buying a photo backpack or sling bag for that photo safari or vacation, consider how you’re getting there, how you’ll get around once you arrive, and what you plan to photograph. Will you be flying commercial or hopping a puddle jumper? Do you anticipate being on foot most of the time or traveling largely by car, jeep, or bus? Do you expect to encounter rugged terrain and steep trails? Will you need fast optics and long zooms for wildlife, a macro for close-ups, a wide zoom for landscapes, and perhaps a speedlight and ring flash?
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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2002 0 comments

Everyone involved in digital printing cannot stress strongly enough the importance of using good-quality inks and media, especially when it comes to printing pictures of true photographic quality. In the case of ink jet printers, we begin, where a choice for our printer indeed exists, by choosing the...

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