George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 22, 2013 0 comments
What is the optimal ISO setting for each shot? How do you decide on the ISO setting to balance shooting needs and image quality? Given that the lowest ISO possible gets you the best image quality, how do you make decisions based on lighting conditions and shooting needs, such as when you need increased shutter speed for hand held shooting or narrower apertures for increased depth of field? How do you decide whether ISO 100, 400 or 800 is best?
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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

I just got a call from a digital photographer we all know and who is one of the pioneers and chief practitioners of the craft. He related the awful tale that we hear all too often these days--that his computer crashed and all the data on his hard drive was gone. Luckily, he had been backing up all along, on CDs and a separate hard drive.

If...

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George Schaub Posted: May 10, 2005 0 comments

Backlight has been bedeviling photographers for years, particularly in landscape
pictures and those where you want to take a shot but simply showed up at your
location at the wrong time of day. Backlight in and of itself is not the problem;
it's how your meter behaves and how you make the reading that creates
it. Simply put, when the subject falls within its own shadow because the brightest
illumination is behind it the meter can be overwhelmed by the illumination and
"fooled" into thinking it has more light for the exposure than the
main subject dictates.

...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 22, 2013 0 comments
Think of the image you create with your digital camera as a negative and that you are a master printer who can take that negative and make as good a print as you have ever seen. When you adopt that mindset you begin to understand the potential of each shot. The expectation that you can do something more with an image can be built into every type of lighting condition, contrast and exposure problem you might face. The attitude should not be that you can “fix it” in software, it is that you should think beyond the exposure to what can be done to the image later when you download it to your computer and work with it in software.
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George Schaub Posted: Jan 28, 2014 0 comments
This photo was made in Raw file format, then enhanced using a Raw processor. Doing so allowed me to get exactly the color, contrast, and richness I wanted. Shooting in Raw is what allowed me to get the most quality out of the image file later.
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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

This issue might seem to have a slight touch of split direction, what with our annual tribute to black and white photography and a trio of new D-SLR reviews thrown in together. But that seeming contradiction is soon dispelled when you consider that the amazing interest in black and white has occurred at the same time as the rise in megapixel counts in cameras. More and more photographers are...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 24, 2014 0 comments
This issue is dedicated to digital techniques, but I feel it’s important to have a discussion on the differences and similarities between black and white film and digital photography. I do this for two reasons—the first is that I figure some of you may have made the transition from film to digital and have carried over some assumptions about how things work. The second is that even if you have never shot film you have probably been exposed to information passed on from film photographers about how things work. Either way, there are a number of matters at the heart of black and white photography that have changed, or at least should be looked at in a new light.
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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

Black and white photography has always held a special place in the hearts and minds of photographers. The charm of the medium is that it is so flexible in both technique and its ability to communicate many different moods and points of view. Consider the documentary photographer, who uses black and white to enclose images in a gritty realism that color somehow cannot match, or the...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 29, 2006 0 comments

Black and White Imaging: Ilford's Perspective

by George Schaub

Given that we all have seen a shrinking in silver-based materials in general
in the last year, and in light of Kodak exiting the black and white paper business,
and Agfa leaving the black and white (and all photo) business altogether, we
were all leftwo...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

Those who have been around for a while have to be amused by the occasional proclamation that another black and white renaissance has occurred. This pronouncement from industry wags is made every few years to usher in another glorious age for black and white photographers and printers. This time around the gushing is around new inkjet papers, dubbed "exhibition quality"...

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