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Monte Zucker Posted: Feb 01, 2005 3 comments

All Photos © 2004, Monte Zucker, All Rights Reserved

Good portraits need to be created with controlled light. You just can't bring people out into open spaces--where light is coming in from all around--and get good results. There are many ways to control light for portraits both in a studio environment and outdoors. I illustrated several of my techniques...

John Stewart Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004 John Stewart, All Rights Reserved

A significant number of photographers routinely set aside their computer-designed wonder lenses to make images with pinholes. And why not? It seems like magic when a simple pinhole poked in one end of a shoe box projects a surprisingly clear image on the other end. Unlike other pinhole how-to's you might have...

Robert E. Mayer Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

Here is a quick tip list on letters for the HELP! desk:
Please confine yourself to only one question per letter. Both postal letters and e-mails are fine, although we prefer e-mail as the most efficient form of communication. Send your e-mail queries to editorial@shutterbug.com with Help in the subject header and your return e-mail address at the end of your message.

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

Black and white photography has always held a special place in the hearts and minds of photographers. The charm of the medium is that it is so flexible in both technique and its ability to communicate many different moods and points of view. Consider the documentary photographer, who uses black and white to enclose images in a gritty realism that color somehow cannot match, or the...

George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2005 1 comments

All Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

I grew up with black and white. Color, for me, was a distraction, a pretty thing that was fine for stock and the family album, but the color of the photographic blood that ran through my veins was monochrome. I spent many a year in the darkroom, honing my black and white skills, and even paid the rent for a good many...

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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Joe Farace, All Rights Reserved

"Adapt or perish, now as ever, in nature's inexorable imperative."--H.G. Wells, 1866-1946

Your digital camera is a time machine that lets you show how the people and places look at this particular point in time. Many people think they need to travel to exotic locations in order to make great...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

Digital Help is designed to aid you in getting the most from your digital photography, printing, scanning, and image creation. Each month, David Brooks provides solutions to problems you might encounter with matters such as color calibration and management, digital printer and scanner settings, and working with digital photographic images with many different kinds of cameras and...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, David B. Brooks, All Rights Reserved

The December 2001 issue of Shutterbug I reported on my trials and experiments with different methods of printing black and white photographs with ink jet printers. Today the challenge to a photographer using a digital darkroom who wants to do black and white prints remains similar to what it was three years ago.

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

Many people seem to believe that darkroom chemicals have a fixed capacity, beyond which they stop working. This is quite a long way from the truth. The life of most chemical baths used in the darkroom can be divided into four stages. First, there is the fresh bath, with full vigor. Second, there is the partially exhausted bath, which still works but takes longer. Third, there is...

Roger W. Hicks Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

What determines whether a camera is collectible? Quality? Technical ingenuity? Commercial success (or failure)? All of these things--but some deserve to be saved from the scrap heap just because they are pretty. The Bilora Bella 44 has little else to commend it. The lens is indifferent; the shutter limited; the 127 film needed to feed it is hard to find; film counting is by...

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