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Steve Meltzer Posted: Jul 13, 2016 1 comments

Like the Olympus Pen, the Panasonic GX8 and the Fujifilm X-T10, the Df’s clean lines, sharp edges and large controls are reminiscent of the finest cameras of film’s glory days in the 1980s and 1990s. They are part of the “retro style” trend that, in the words of the inimitable Yogi Berra, is “déjà vu all over again.”

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Steve Meltzer Posted: May 05, 2016 1 comments

The decisive moment had decisively passed and I missed another great shot: While framing and reframing my zoom lens the scene changed, the sun slid behind a cloud, and people in the shot moved. I finally realized I was missing shots because I had too much gear. 

Steve Meltzer Posted: Mar 21, 2016 0 comments

For my photography I prefer small, lightweight, responsive cameras to big, heavy, bulky DSLRs. While small cameras once lagged behind DSLRs in image quality and performance, today’s compact cameras are challenging their dominance with great cameras like the Sony A7S IIPanasonic Lumix DMC-LX100Nikon P900 and the new, elegant retro Olympus Pen-F. These compact, bridge and hybrid cameras can even do things some big, bulky DSLRs can’t.

Steve Meltzer Posted: Nov 11, 2015 0 comments

After 140 years of photography, camera design has reached something of a pinnacle with today’s DSLRs and mirrorless cameras. But along the way to our digital era there were lots of false starts and dead ends. These were unusual cameras that had their brief moment and then simply disappeared.

Steve Meltzer Posted: Sep 30, 2015 0 comments

Scottish photographer and living legend Albert Watson is no stranger to accolades. Earlier this year, Watson was awarded the Order of the British Empire (OBE) by Queen Elizabeth II for his contributions to photography.

Steve Meltzer Posted: Sep 14, 2015 0 comments

In 1955, armed with a couple of Leicas, several bottles of French brandy, and hundreds of rolls of film, the photographer Robert Frank set out on an odyssey to look for the soul of America. Behind the wheel of his black Ford Business coupe, he drove over 10,000 miles of endless highways and forgotten back roads; and made nearly 27,000 photographs. From these road-trip images he created a “photobook,” a work that has had a profound impact on photography and photographers ever since: The Americans.

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Steve Meltzer Posted: Jul 10, 2015 0 comments

Here at Shutterbug we like to keep an eye on the selfie photography phenomenon in all its wacky strangeness. We’ve reported on everything from Olivia Muus’ spoof of famous museum portraits taking selfies to the hilarious, faux PSA warning of selfie stick abuse.

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Steve Meltzer Posted: Jul 08, 2015 0 comments

Ernst Haas was a pioneering photographer who broke through the black-and-white glass ceiling with his superb color photography. He changed the way color was thought of and how it was used. And the change began in 1953 when his color work burst on the scene when Life magazine published Haas’ stunning color essay about New York titled “Images of a Magic City.”

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Steve Meltzer Posted: Jul 01, 2015 0 comments

Social documentary photographer Larry Fink, who’s well known for his striking black-and-white images of high society and the down-and-out, was honored at the 2015 Infinity Awards gala at the International Center for Photography a few months ago. In attendance at this sumptuous event were celebrities including the model Naomi Campbell, the actor Alan Rickman and photographers Steve McCurry, Susan Meiselas, Sylvia Plachy and others.

Steve Meltzer Posted: May 06, 2015 0 comments

Photographer Josef Sudek is called the Poet of Prague because in tens of thousands of luminous images he captured the timeless soul of this city that is known as “The Jewel of Europe.” Sudek ceaselessly photographed the city’s streets, its forests and its atmosphere. But unlike Eugene Atget’s photgraphs of Paris, Sudek’s images transcend place and time and are meditative visions of light itself.

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