Steve Meltzer

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Steve Meltzer Posted: Mar 20, 2015 0 comments

Arthur Tress is a master storyteller who first gained recognition with his hauntingly beautiful book of images: The Dream Collector (Richmond, Westover 1972). The book was a challenge to the photographic ethos of its time.

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Steve Meltzer Posted: Mar 04, 2015 0 comments

Roberto Neumiller is one angry photographer. A well-respected photojournalist based in Paris, Neumiller went to the African Sahel in 2006 where he photographed the daily lives of workers in the region. When the images were originally published they were widely praised.

Steve Meltzer Posted: Mar 04, 2015 0 comments

My dog-eared copy of Josef Koudelka’s Gypsies sits in the bookcase next to Cartier-Bresson’s Decisive Moments and Robert Frank’s The Americans. Like those books, it was fundamental to my development as a photographer. From the moment I saw it I was mesmerized by its stunning black-and-white images. Published by Aperture Books in 1975, it contained page after page of Koudelka’s dark and brooding photographs of European gypsies; the Romani or Roma people.

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Steve Meltzer Posted: Feb 25, 2015 0 comments

The mayor of the Belgian town of Charleroi, Paul Magnette, admits he’s not an expert on photography but he says he does know bad journalism when he sees it. And he knew he had to act when he saw that Italian photographer Giovanni Troilo had won first prize for "contemporary issues” in the prestigious World Press Photo's contest for his bleak photo essay about Charleroi called “The Dark Heart of Europe.”

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Steve Meltzer Posted: Jan 14, 2015 0 comments

An American Odyssey (Taschen 2014) is a spectacular photo scrapbook voyage across turn-of-the-century America. Gathered from the 19th and early 20th century “color” print and picture postcard collection of photographer Marc Walter, with the assistance of documentarian Sabine Arqué, it is a huge 612-page coffee table book that tips the scales at nearly 16 pounds.

Steve Meltzer Posted: Dec 30, 2014 0 comments

Beth Moon’s photo book Ancient Trees: Portraits of Time is the result of a 14-year-long global journey in search of the oldest, most ancient trees on Earth. In this book of gorgeously reproduced black-and-white images, Moon takes us to into magical primordial forests and to isolated islands on a voyage of discovery.

Steve Meltzer Posted: Dec 26, 2014 0 comments

Carleton Watkins was perhaps America’s greatest 19th century landscape photographer yet today he’s largely unknown. His breathtaking landscapes of the Yosemite Valley were instrumental in preserving the valley for future generations and paving the way for both the National Parks system and the environmental movement.

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Steve Meltzer Posted: Dec 12, 2014 0 comments

The sale of Peter Lik’s photograph "Phantom" for a reported record $6.5 million earlier this week has stirred up a firestorm of online commentaries, media chest pounding and a lot of silliness. Critic Jonathan Jones writing in The Guardian (UK), has gone so far as to say that the sale was especially grotesque because in his words "photography is not an art."

Steve Meltzer Posted: Dec 10, 2014 0 comments

Good photographers are said to have a good “eye” that distinguishes them from other photographers. There’s no better way to understand this than to see how several very good photographers photograph the same subject. A case in point is a new exhibition of photographs of Marilyn Monroe titled “Inoubliable Marilyn” (“Unforgettable Marilyn”) at Paris’s La Galerie de l’Instant (December 12, 2014-February 25, 2015).

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Steve Meltzer Posted: Nov 21, 2014 0 comments

Lucien Clergue, one of France’s foremost photographers, died on November 15th at the age of 80 in his native city of Arles after a long illness. A founder of the Rencontres d’Arles international photography festival, he was called the “Eye of the Midi” for his stunning black-and-white images that captured the sensuality of Mediterranean life in the Midi, a nickname for the South of France.

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