Photo How To

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Scott Kelby  |  May 24, 2017  |  0 comments

Q. Re: your answer to the question about solving noise problems in the writer’s wedding shots in the February 2017 issue. You mentioned Photoshop, Lightroom, and Nik for noise reduction, but left out the best noise reduction software I’ve ever used—DxO’s OpticsPro 11. I had great night shots of lava flowing into the sea off Hawaii that were unusable because of noise, but OpticsPro 11 Prime worked wonders.

Ron Leach  |  May 23, 2017  |  0 comments

One of the benefits of today’s advanced digital cameras is that they offer extremely high ISO settings that deliver remarkable results under low-light conditions. When shooting with good light, however, most photographers simply set their camera to its base sensitivity of ISO 100 or 200.

Ron Leach  |  May 23, 2017  |  0 comments

Despite the rapid advancements in digital imaging technology there’s been a growing resurgence in the use of 35mm cameras for shooting everything from portraits and street scenes to landscape photography. To address this renewed interest in film, Ilford Photo has created an “Introduction to Film Photography” video series designed to get budding film users up to speed.

Ron Leach  |  May 22, 2017  |  0 comments

Most great photographers are also accomplished visual storytellers who understand how to draw viewers into their scene and direct their eyes to the key element in the image. In the video below you’ll learn 10 quick tips for doing exactly that, while making your photographs more impactful.

Ron Leach  |  May 19, 2017  |  1 comments

Food always looks great in TV and magazine ads, right? That’s usually the case whether we’re talking about a cheap burger at a fast food joint or an expensive steak at a nice restaurant. Well, we hate to break it to you but some of that appetizing food you drool over in ads isn’t really edible at all.

Dan Havlik  |  May 18, 2017  |  0 comments

Videos about photo tricks and photo hacks are some of our most popular posts so here’s another good one from the folks at COOPH. In the below video, titled “10 Photography Tricks to Do at Home,” COOPH’s photographers are once again showing you cheap, fun, and easy photo ideas to give you images extra oomph without having to spend a lot of money (or time.)

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 18, 2017  |  0 comments

One of my go-to lenses has a serious flaw. It doesn’t focus closer than 4-feet. I found a solution on eBay for $10 and Bob’s your uncle. 

Ron Leach  |  May 11, 2017  |  0 comments

If you’re unfamiliar with the term “bullet time,” it’s a frozen-moment visual effect in which some parts of a scene proceed at normal speed while others (like flying bullets) are slowed dramatically as you see in the short clip below and a longer version at the bottom of this page.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 11, 2017  |  0 comments

Binoculars make great gifts, but navigating the styles, descriptions, specifications and nomenclature can be dizzying. How does an 8x42 compare to a 7x50, and why are some models $999 while others are $99? Here’s a sensible (and short) guide to buying binoculars. 

Ron Leach  |  May 10, 2017  |  0 comments

Many of the most dramatic outdoor images are made by experienced photographers using neutral density (ND) filters in conjunction with long exposures. In the video below you’ll learn everything you need to know about choosing the proper ND filter for the scene at hand and using it properly.

Ron Leach  |  May 08, 2017  |  0 comments

All photographers love quick tips to help them improve their images and protect their gear. And if that advice involves using inexpensive household items you already have, all the better.

Dan Havlik  |  May 04, 2017  |  0 comments

Time-lapse videos are all the rage these days but there’s much that separates a decent time-lapse from a great one. One thing that can help set your time-lapse apart is to feature some type of movement in the video to give it a more dynamic look. And one way to add movement is by using some type of camera slider.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 04, 2017  |  0 comments

If the used camera lens you see online is packaged with a leash and a bone, odds are very good that it’s a dog. But in the absence of obvious evidence, how can you tell a bargain from a bagel? It’s impossible to physically examine the merchandise before purchase. And you can’t always trust what you see in the listing photos. However, you can conduct a thorough inspection upon receipt. Here are 10 things to check the minute the used lens is delivered. 

Seth Shostak  |  May 04, 2017  |  0 comments

Soon enough, your camera will join the ranks of the well connected. That’s not to say it will be invited to A-list parties, but only that it will become a participant in the highly touted Internet of Things, now coming ’round the mountain.

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