Classic Camera Reviews

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S. "Fritz" Takeda  |  Oct 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Some 15,000 visitors attended the 29th Used Camera Show sponsored by ICS (Import Camera Society) at Matsuya department store's convention hall, in which 19 leading used camera shops in Tokyo participated earlier this year. According to the show's organizers, the show generated some 15 percent more traffic compared with last year, despite a predicted decline in the...

S. "Fritz" Takeda  |  Jul 01, 2006  |  0 comments

Tokyo, Japan--Ginza is Tokyo's Fifth Avenue. Cartier, Chaumet, Dior, Hermes, Tiffany, Harry Winston, and all the other flamboyant luxury stores are there. Department stores are there as well, but unlike their counterparts in the Western world, they are quality shops with many chauffeur-driven limousines in the parking lot. One of the most fashionable department stores...

John Wade  |  Nov 15, 2013  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2013  |  0 comments

Cameras with built-in meters were not rare in the 1960s, but the problem with camera meters before the Topcon RE Super was that the cell took in a different view than that of the lens. Using a standard lens that was mostly okay, but if a wide-angle or telephoto lens were fitted, changing the field of view and the part of the subject needing to be accurately metered, it was a different matter.

John Wade  |  Jan 15, 2013  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2012  |  13 comments

Making panoramic pictures in the digital age is easy. But it’s a lot more fun to use classic panoramic cameras, many of which can still be bought and used today.

 

The first panoramic camera was the Megaskop, made in 1844 to produce daguerreotypes on silver-plated copper plates, 4.7x17.5” wide. Later, there were Cirkut cameras, made first by the Rochester Panoramic Camera Company in 1904 and later by Kodak. These cameras were, and still are, used to produce super-wide school or sports club pictures. As the exposure was made, a clockwork motor rotated the camera on its tripod while inside the film traveled from one spool to another, past a slit at the focal plane.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Dec 01, 2015  |  0 comments

What's it like to use a strange plastic camera lens from 1950 on a modern mirrorless camera? That's the subject of this latest "Weird Lens Challenge" video from photographer Mathieu Stern.

Roger W. Hicks  |  Apr 01, 2003  |  0 comments

The Bessa-R2C and R2S are both variants on the superb R2. Instead of the Leica bayonet mount of the R2, however, the new cameras have the original 1932-1961 Contax mount (R2C) and the original 1948-1963...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz  |  Apr 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Pick up the new Bessa R3M (or R2M--only the viewfinders differ) and it takes you back in time. At a solid 430 gm (a fraction over 15 oz) it has the heft and overall feel of a high-quality camera from the 1950s or '60s. Appropriately, it is the best Bessa yet, produced to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the founding of Voigtländer, and is engraved...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz  |  Apr 01, 2006  |  0 comments

Just when you thought the R2 was the pinnacle of Voigtländer Bessa design, along came the R2A and R3A. They differ from the R2 in several ways, most notably the adoption of an electronic shutter allowing Aperture Priority automation; this is combined with a new meter. Other significant differences are a revised (and easier-to-use) rewind crank; the addition of a back lock...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz  |  Sep 01, 2006  |  0 comments

Is there still a demand for an entry-level film SLR camera? The folks at Voigtländer seem to think so, evidenced by their new VSL 43. It is very much an entry-level SLR, with a manually set (but completely battery-dependent) shutter from 1/2 sec to 1/2000 sec, flash sync at 1/60 sec, manual focusing, manual diaphragm, and manual film advance. There is a through-lens meter...

Dan Havlik  |  Apr 16, 2019  |  0 comments

Now here's something very cool for fans of Nikon's classic analog SLRs. Nikon Rumors has unearthed the below commercial from 1997 for the Nikon F5, which spotlights one its most unique features.

Roger W. Hicks  |  Feb 01, 2009  |  2 comments

The Germans notoriously have a word for the guilty pleasure of enjoying another’s misfortune or embarrassment: Schadenfreude.

Dan Havlik  |  Nov 02, 2015  |  0 comments

Ever wonder what it might be like to use an ancient lens on a brand new digital camera? Photographer Mathieu Stern did so he created a cool new video series where he does just that.

S. "Fritz" Takeda  |  Sep 01, 2004  |  0 comments

KATSUMIDO at Ginza is the biggest used camera shop in Tokyo, specializing in rare items in mint condition. KATSUMIDO is known as the most expensive and the most quality-intensive used camera boutique in Tokyo. In the central oblong showcase of the store, the best and the rarest cameras...

Michael Chiusano  |  Jul 06, 2017  |  0 comments

Today’s digital cameras have become so adept at almost any shooting situation that, paradoxically, they can inhibit creativity by always delivering a technically perfect result. With little effort, a photographer can produce a sharp, clear, well-exposed image, color balanced and, well, a bit too perfect.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Apr 17, 2019  |  0 comments

There's was a time, not long ago, when the Fujifilm X-Pro1 was at the top-of-the-heap of the mirrorless camera world. Nowadays, though, you can get this retro-style digital camera for a reasonable price, which is why classic camera reviewer Mattias Burling says the 16MP X-Pro1 is a must-buy for bargain hunters.

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