LATEST STORIES

George Schaub  |  Jun 26, 2007  |  0 comments

The III also sports a new Raw option, dubbed sRAW, which is 2.5 megapixels
in size and half the file size of "regular" Raw images. The advantage,
claims Canon, is that sRAW images can be processed just like any Raw image but
stored in at a smaller size. This is perfect, they say, for wedding candid photographers
who want Raw post-exposurepr...

 |  Jun 26, 2007  |  0 comments

Southern
California

The Artistry Corel Painter Retreat

Taught by Karen Sperling

August 27, 28 and 29, 2007

The Artistry GARTEL

Marketing for Photographers Seminar

Taught by Laurence Gartel

August 30 and 31, 2007

Contact Information

Karen Sperling

http://ww...

Howard Millard  |  Jun 26, 2007  |  0 comments


Learn how to shoot striking panoramas like this at Howard Millard's
DigitalPanorami...

Ron Leach  |  Jun 26, 2007  |  0 comments

Consumer Habits

By Ron Leach

One of the best ways to gauge near-term trends in the photo industry is to
take a look at what types of cameras are being purchased and what methods photographers
use to output their images. We just received an interesting report from the
Photo Marketing Association (PMA) that provides someup...

George Schaub  |  Jun 26, 2007  |  0 comments

...


Courtesy of Sigma Corporation, All Rights Reserved

Shutterbug Staff  |  Jun 26, 2007  |  0 comments

Online video and photo sharing service Phanfare (www.phanfare.com) has announced
a special offer for current customers of Yahoo! Photos. Yahoo! Photos recently
informed their customers that their photos stored at Yahoo! Photos will be deleted
at the end of the summer. In response, Phanfare is offering Yahoo! Photos customers
the opportunity to move and save their photos from Yahoo! Photos to their own
Phanfare Web sites, known for family-friendly, private, secure, advertising-free
albums. As an added bonus, current Yahoo! Photos customers will get six months
free service when they move their photos to Phanfare.

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Shutterbug Staff  |  Jun 25, 2007  |  0 comments

MediaStreet Inc is introducing its new "15-inch eMotion Digital Picture
Frame." The announcement comes on the heels of the company's recent
introduction of a Bluetooth-enabled digital frame, and soon to be announced
WiFi Frame. The new 15-inch eMotion frame provides an extremely high resolution
(1024 x 768), 15-inch (4:3 aspect ratio) Digital TFT LCD panel for clear, sharp
picture quality.

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Shutterbug Staff  |  Jun 22, 2007  |  0 comments

Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE:EK) has introduced a new image sensor technology
that is said to provides a significant increase in sensitivity to light when
compared to current sensor designs. With this new technology, users will realize
a 2x to 4x increase in sensitivity (from one to two photographic stops), which
will improve performance when taking pictures under low light and reduce motion
blur when imaging moving subjects. In addition, this technology enables the
design of smaller pixels (leading to higher resolutions in a given optical format)
while retaining imaging performance.



This breakthrough advances an existing Kodak technology that has become a standard
in digital imaging. Today, the design of almost all color image sensors is based
on the "Bayer Pattern," an arrangement of red, green, and blue pixels
that was first developed by Kodak Scientist Dr. Bryce Bayer in 1976. In this
design, half of the pixels on the sensor are used to collect green light, with
the remaining pixels split evenly between sensitivity to red and blue light.
After exposure, software reconstructs a full color signal for each pixel in
the final image.



Kodak's new proprietary technology builds on the existing Bayer Pattern
by adding panchromatic, or "clear" pixels to the red, green, and
blue pixels already on the sensor. Since these pixels are sensitive to all wavelengths
of visible light, they collect a significantly higher proportion of the light
striking the sensor. The remaining red, green, and blue pixels are then used
to record the color information of the scene.



To reconstruct a full color image, Kodak has also developed new software algorithms
specifically designed to work with the raw data generated from these new image
sensors. These sophisticated algorithms use the more sensitive panchromatic
pixels to act as the luminance channel of the final image, and derive chrominance
information from the color pixels on the sensor. Leveraging over 30 years of
Kodak image science, these new algorithms support the increased sensitivity
provided by these new pixel patterns, while retaining the overall image quality
and color fidelity required by customers.



Kodak is beginning to work with a number of leading companies to implement this
new technology in system-wide solutions and to streamline the design-in process.



Kodak is developing CMOS sensors using this technology for consumer markets
such as digital still cameras and camera phones. As the technology is appropriate
for use with both CCD and CMOS image sensors, however, its use can be expanded
across Kodak's full portfolio of image sensors, including products targeted
to applied imaging markets such as industrial and scientific imaging. The first
Kodak sensor to use this technology is expected to be available for sampling
in the first quarter of 2008.



For more information on Kodak's entire image sensor product line, please
visit www.kodak.com/go/imagers.

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Shutterbug Staff  |  Jun 21, 2007  |  0 comments

Digital Spectrum Solutions Inc. (www.DSIcentral.com)
has announced that its new wireless MemoryFrame 8104 Premium is now available.
This next-generation digital-picture frame is capable of sharing content over
the Internet and integrates easily with home media servers. It integrates the
new multimedia features of Microsoft Windows Vista and fully supports capabilities
such as Windows Media Connect and Windows Connect Now. It also fully supports
the features and capabilities of Windows XP used in conjunction with Windows
Media Player 11.

...

Shutterbug Staff  |  Jun 20, 2007  |  0 comments

Leica Camera AG has announced that it will provide a free firmware update for
the LEICA DIGILUX 3 on its website www.leica-camera.com.
The new firmware for the LEICA DIGILUX 3 optimizes the functionality of the
camera across many applications. This will include additional exposure functions
and will, for the first time, offer a "Mode 3" for optical stabilization.
Mode 3 will further compensate and correct longitudinal camera movement. This
mode is ideal for panning, a method of taking photographs where the camera follows
a moving object.



Version 2.0 will also include a new mode that facilitates the viewing of the
LCD monitor during use of the LiveView function. This setting will assist the
photographer when the camera is held in a position close to ground level. Further
improvements include the "Auto Review" setting, a Replay Zoom, easier
accessibility to the ISO setting in Auto Exposure (AE) mode, as well as further
improvements to camera operation and user interface.



Detailed information on the firmware update for the LEICA DIGILUX 3 will be
available at www.leica-camera.com in the Photography/D-System/Digilux 3 section
beginning in mid June 2007.

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