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Joe Farace Posted: Mar 10, 2015 0 comments
I’m very excited to kick off the new year with websites from four photographers whose photographs could not be more different from one another, yet each shows the power of photography as the universal language. Anyone who is interested in pursuing fine art photography as either a career or avocation will find that these websites represent a virtual master class and I hope that the photographs will inspire you, as they do me, to make 2015 a year in which we all focus our energies in creating more and better images.
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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 10, 2015 0 comments

Instead of visions of sugarplums, it’s gadgets, gizmos, and software dancing through digital photographers’ heads during the holidays. Presented for your approval is a collection of fun and affordable tools to put a smile on your face and make imaging next year easier and more creative. You can use this column as a shopping list for your favorite photographer or grab a Sharpie and circle the goodies you want and leave it near where your spouse eats his or her Cap’n Crunch. It’s worked for me.

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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 27, 2015 1 comments

Traditional flat reflectors do a good job of bouncing fill light when placed under a subject’s chin for portrait lighting but catchlights in their eyes can sometimes appear less than natural. Westcott’s Eyelighter Reflective Panel addresses the problem by providing an arc-shaped surface that matches the natural curvature of the human eye. Specifically designed for beauty and portrait photography, the Eyelighter reflects an arched light up toward your subject, producing not only flattering light but also a catchlight that follows the natural curve of the iris. Unlike three-piece, multi-reflector kits, this catchlight is seamless, without gaps.

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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 13, 2015 0 comments

If there is any one technical aspect that has not changed in the transition from film to digital it’s been the pursuit of “perfect” exposure, which is ultimately dictated by the latitude of the capture medium. Latitude is the extent to which film or an imaging chip can be overexposed or underexposed and still produce an acceptable result.

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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 12, 2015 0 comments

Thanksgiving is a uniquely American holiday when friends come together and share a meal and their feelings for one another. The World Wide Web is another way we can share images with others, no matter where they may be located on this vast planet. Over the years I have made some really great friends who I would never have met except for the Internet, which is its real power. Here are a few photographer friends I’ve met online through their excellent websites.

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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 09, 2015 0 comments

Since scratching the first drawings of animals onto cave walls, humans have been compelled to create images of their world for others to see and understand. During the past 150 years, the shape, size, and technology of the tools we have used to produce photographs has changed drastically. To capture sweeping landscape vistas, we no longer need to drive a mule-drawn darkroom wagon into the wilderness. Now a camera that fits in a pocket can do the job. During the coming year, the means that we will use to capture photographs may change but not the motivation to share a view of our world with other people.

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 30, 2014 0 comments

Tamron’s 14-150mm Di III is the company’s first lens designed for the mirrorless Micro Four Thirds camera system. When originally announced, this lens was supposed to feature built-in VC (Vibration Compensation) image stabilization but over the course of its development—there’s lots of in-body stabilization in this format—this feature was removed.

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 09, 2014 0 comments
When I was a student at the Maryland Institute College of Art back in the film days, there was a bulletin board near the school’s darkrooms where misplaced negatives were pinned. It was officially called “The Little Lost Negative Board” but someone had surreptitiously added, “Someday my prints will come.”
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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 03, 2014 0 comments

Tamron is a pioneer in all-in-one, do-everything lenses. Their new 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di PZD lens is designed for Canon, Nikon and Sony shooters and I tested the Canon EF version using an EOS 5D Mark I and an EOS 50D, which changes the lens’ angle-of-view to that of a 45-480mm lens.

Joe Farace Posted: Nov 04, 2014 0 comments

One way that photographers can add variety to a portrait session is to shoot a few images in black and white. The way I like to do it is to put the camera in monochrome mode then shoot with Raw+JPEG capture, creating two files at the same time—one in color, the other in monochrome—that you can show your subject right away. I did this recently and the subject loved the look of the black-and-white portrait so much that we continued the session shooting that way. That said, since this is the lighting issue I’d like to start with some new items to light up your photo life.

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