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Edited by George Schaub Posted: Oct 09, 2012 Published: Sep 01, 2012 1 comments

The new Fujifilm X-Pro1 has a stylish, retro design with many interesting features. It is Fujifilm’s first compact system camera with Fujifilm’s new lens mount system. Fujifilm currently offers three lenses for the “X mount”: the XF18mm f/2 R, the XF35mm f/1.4 R, and the XF60mm f/2.4 R Macro. We used the 35mm lens for all our test images and the 60mm lens for the portrait test shot.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jun 14, 2016 0 comments

Just like the Fujifilm X-Pro1, which was introduced in 2012, the new Fujifilm X-Pro2 mirrorless camera is based on an APS-C sensor, but it uses a completely new version of the “X-Trans CMOS” sensor and now offers 24 megapixels instead of 16MP. The X-Pro2 is the first camera of Fujifilm’s X system that uses this new sensor. (Note: The new X-E2S still uses the 16MP version sensor.)

Edited by George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2012 0 comments

The X-S1 is Fujifilm’s newest bridge camera based on the same large EXR sensor (2/3 in) used in the company’s X-10 camera. The camera offers an extreme zoom lens (26x) for a (35mm equivalent) range of 24mm-624mm. An optical image stabilizer aids in preventing motion blur when using the extreme tele setting or shooting under low light conditions.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jan 02, 2015 0 comments

The Fujifilm X-T1 is a retro-style mirrorless Compact System Camera (CSC) that looks like an SLR of the 1970s and offers numerous setup dials to change nearly all image parameters without using the LCD screen menu. A dial for shutter speed, ISO speed, and EV control (+/- 3 EV steps) sits atop the camera. Below the ISO speed and the shutter speed dial, the camera offers additional setup rings that allow for change of the exposure mode (spot metering, for example), of the drive mode (single shot, continuous shot in two different rates), or to activate the bracketing function.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Apr 16, 2013 0 comments

Fujifilm’s X100s follows the X100 and offers enhanced imaging features and functions. The most important difference is the new sensor--the X-Trans CMOS sensor uses aspecial RGB mosaic pattern and offers higher resolution compared to the sensor in the X100. The new sensor has special mirco lenses that result in a very sharp and brilliant image, which is then enhanced further with the camera’s new EXR II image processor.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jan 09, 2015 0 comments

The Fujifilm X100T is the newest camera of the X model series. It uses an APS-C sized sensor with 16MP and has a 23mm integral lens, equivalent to nearly 35mm in 35mm film format. The lens is fast at f2.0 and offers very sharp, crisp images.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: May 03, 2013 2 comments

The X20 uses an X-Trans sensor just like all new Fujifilm X cameras. Instead of an APS-C-sized system it’s a 2/3 inch sensor, which is slightly smaller than APS-C, but still very large for a compact camera. In combination with the moderate resolution of 12MP the camera offers very clean and noise-free images.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Feb 28, 2013 1 comments

The Fujifilm XF1 has a compact body with a retro design that is emphasized by the optional black, brown or red artificial leather and the matte metal finish. The camera doesn’t have an on/off switch but is activated by turning the lens ring on the camera front. This then opens the lens cover and extends the lens system.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jan 03, 2014 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments

The Leica M is a large and robust rangefinder camera with a magnesium-alloy chassis with top and bottom covers cut from brass blocks. All elements are carefully sealed against dust and moisture and overall offers the handling, feel, and touch one has come to associate with Leica M cameras of the past.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Dec 23, 2015 0 comments

The new Leica SL (Typ 601) is a brand new mirrorless system camera with a full frame sensor and a resolution of 24MP. The SL can't be described as a Compact System Camera because it has a very heavy and robust body built by a milling machine out of a massive aluminum block and is comparable to the size of a standard SLR system.

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