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Edited by George Schaub Posted: Nov 12, 2013 Published: Oct 01, 2013 1 comments

The Canon M is Canon’s first mirrorless system camera. It uses an APS-C-sized sensor (slightly smaller than APS-C, just like all Canon “APS-C” cameras) with 18MP resolution. The camera doesn’t offer an optical or electronic viewfinder; the photographer has to use the large (3”) LCD screen on the back that offers a remarkably high resolution of 1,040,000 RGB dots. While it offers a very crisp and clear image, an additional viewfinder, for shooting under bright light conditions, would have been welcome. The monitor is “fixed” and does not offer swiveling, or articulation. It is, however, a “touchscreen” type, which is fully integrated into the operational concept of the camera.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Feb 24, 2015 0 comments

For a compact camera, the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II has a large image sensor; in fact, it is slightly larger than the sensor found in Micro Four Thirds cameras. The G1 X II offers a moderate resolution of 13 megapixels, with maximum resolution in images with an aspect ratio of 4:3. By default, however, the camera is set to an aspect ratio of 3:2 that delivers slightly less image resolution.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jul 16, 2013 Published: Jun 01, 2013 0 comments

The Canon G15 follows the G12. The new model has a massive, robust, and heavy body and has major changes from its predecessor.
The G15 is Canon’s newest high-end compact system with a 12MP sensor (1/1.7”), a large LCD screen, and a lot of manually controlled image parameters. It allows the user to shoot Full HD video.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Nov 07, 2012 Published: Oct 01, 2012 0 comments

The Canon SX40 HS is a compact bridge camera with an extreme zoom lens. It offers focal length settings between 24mm and 840mm (35mm film camera equivalent), which allows users to shoot nice wide-angle shots to extreme telephoto images. Adjusting the zoom lens between 24mm and 300mm is easy and allows a nearly continuous setup of the desired field of view. However, zooming between 500mm and 840mm requires more work.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jan 24, 2014 Published: Dec 01, 2013 0 comments

The robust and relatively heavy body of the Canon SX50 HS has a metal-based chassis and is designed like a small SLR system. A large handle on the right-hand side of the body gives a stable grip and allows for comfortable handling when shooting. The motorized zoom lens is controlled via an easy-to-use zoom switch; focal length selection is quite sensitive to the touch.

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Edited by George Schaub Posted: May 12, 2015 0 comments

The Canon Rebel T6s and T6i are based on the same camera design: Both use an APS-C sized sensor (Canon's “APS-C” with 22.9 x 14.9 mm) with a resolution of 24MP. They also use the same image processor, the DIGIC 6. However, there are some design differences. While the TS6i looks like a little modified version of its forerunner T5i, the design of the T6s is more reminiscent of the mid-range SLR system EOS 70D. The illustrations provided show the differences in design and setup between the two models.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jun 13, 2012 Published: May 01, 2012 9 comments

The Fuji X10 offers a 4x zoom lens with manual zoom control. The zoom lens ring is also used as the On/Off switch. The photographer has to turn the zoom ring to unlock the lens and to start the camera, which we found to be a very handy feature. We also feel that manual zoom control allows for a more precise and fast adjustment of the focal length compared to the servo zooms of some other compact cameras.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Sep 07, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 29 comments

The HS30EXR has a surprisingly heavy and massive body and is nearly the size of an entry-level SLR system combined with a superzoom lens. The grip on the right-hand side fits perfectly into the photographer’s hand, while the left hand supports the lens system and is used to change focus and focal length manually with two large lens rings. The focal length ring has a nice rubber coating and is easy to handle, while the focus ring is very thin and is located near the body of the camera, which makes it a bit less easy to handle. Focal length adjustment is done via a mechanical regulation of the lens system, while the focusing ring adjusts via a servo system.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jun 04, 2013 0 comments

The Fujifilm HS50EXR is a bridge camera with an SLR-like design and a super zoom lens. The camera has very good workmanship/finishing; the body and the lens system are large and robust.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Sep 02, 2014 0 comments

The Fujifilm X-A1 is the “little sister” of the X-M1. Both cameras have nearly the same design and technical features but use different sensor technology. The X-M1 uses Fujifilm’s X-Trans CMOS sensor while the X-A1 is equipped with a 16MP sensor with the Bayer RGB pattern, although it should be mentioned it is APS-C size. The different sensors are the main reason for the lower price of the X-A1, making it one of the least expensive X-type cameras with a detachable lens system.

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