LATEST STORIES

Rick Shimonkevitz Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Imagine a hand holdable single lens reflex camera that has front movements similar to a view camera to allow control of plane of focus. If you think that's a pretty modern concept, you are only about 100 years too late. The Soho Reflex camera, made from 1905 up to the 1940s, was just such an item. Manufactured by Kershaw of Leeds, England, and marketed under several...

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Maria Piscopo Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

To answer some current technical questions on the digital aspects of the business side of stock photography, we talked to three industry veterans: Rohn Engh of PhotoSource International (www.photosource.com), Rick Rappaport, owner of Rick Rappaport Photography (http://www.rickrappaport.com"...

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C.A. Boylan Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Step-By-Step Digital Photography: A Guide For Beginners, Second Edition; by Jack and Sue Drafahl, Amherst Media; 112 pages; $14.95; (ISBN 1-58428-141-3)
Legions of amateur photographers are ready to join the digital revolution and manufacturers have answered the call with a wide variety of cameras to get them started. Professional photojournalists...

David B. Brooks Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

If anything over the years characterizes doing photography digitally, it is Adobe's Photoshop--now the standard mainstay application at the heart of a digital darkroom. I can't remember now just how many years ago I was introduced to Adobe's yet-to-be-released PhotoDeluxe 1.0 at a Comdex computer show. I was impressed with PhotoDeluxe at its beginning...

Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Joe Farace, All Rights Reserved

One of the few problems with digital image capture is you tend to shoot more photographs than if you had to pay for processing them. (You really have to pay for all these extra images--there is no free digital lunch--but that's a topic for another story.) If you're gonna shoot lots of pictures...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Photo © 2004, Steve Bedell, All Rights Reserved

The Doucet Family
This photo of the David Doucet family is a good example of why I prefer digital capture and retouching for my group images. The boy only stayed in this position for a few images, then we had to sit him on mom. I liked this composition much better so this is the "base"...

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Jack Warren Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Henry Diltz is a photographer who made his living first as musician with Modern
Folk Quartet (MFQ), then as a trusted friend and photographer of many successful
groups from that time forward. The Lovin Spoon Full, The Mama's and Papa's,
Crosby Stills and Nash, The Doors and many more. He bought his first camera
a Kodak "Pony", while on tour with his group. They had a photo shoot
out with slide film and when they got home they shared them with each other
in a slide show. That was enough to hook Henry on photography forever.



Photos © Henry Diltz, All Rights Reserved

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Velbon is expanding its range of carbon fiber tripod choices by offering the
El Carmagne leg assemblies separately. These ultra-light full-size models are
said to be among the lightest, most portable and affordable in their class.
All are constructed of strong, durable, lightweight carbon fiber with magnesium
body, have low-angle adjustment levers allowing extreme grounder capability
with minimum heights mere inches off the ground, and provide heavy-duty 12-pound
load capacity. Other features include robust flip-lock levers for quick leg
adjustment, easy to read leg length adjustment marks, a removable split/lift
center column with accessory hook, and neoprene grips on all legs for comfortable
cold-weather handling.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

It's not often a camera like the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ comes along.
But when it does, it thankfully arrives in several flavors to suit various tastes,
in 4-, and 5-Mp versions, priced at $499 (DMC-FZ15), and $599 (DMC-FZ20), respectively.




For starters, what makes the Lumix FZ stand out is the Leica DC Vario-Elmarit
6-72mm/12x optical zoom lens, which translates into 36-432mm, in 35mm parlance.
More astounding still is the maximum aperture: f/2.8, which defines a fast lens
for this zoom range, one eminently suited to low-light situations. As if that
weren't enough, optical image stabilization should help when shooting
in subdued light at relatively long shutter speeds, a key feature we'll
be testing.

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

There are times when we have images that are too dark or too light and often
reject them out of hand. But the values only need to be adjusted to bring what
might have sat in shadow into the light. We can do that selectively with certain
tonal areas in the print or globally--that is, on the entire image. This
web how-to covers revealing what might sit in the shadows and deals with a very
simple global adjustment. The work is done here in Photoshop, but many other
image manipulation programs have similar controls.

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