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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 20, 2012 Published: May 01, 2012 8 comments

Camera bags and carriers come in every shape and style, from highly functional rollers to bags that make a fashion statement whenever you step out the door with your gear. Among the new products appearing this year are those that will fit every photographer for every photo excursion. There are backpacks for day hikers to trekkers, and rollers for making the transition from plane to city streets. Camera carrier makers are always improving product to keep up with the changing needs of photographers and their gear.

Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 19, 2012 Published: May 01, 2012 0 comments

The trend in tripods is toward more compact and lighter-weight tripods, with an increasing number of entries in carbon fiber. Is carbon fiber the ultimate lightweight tripod? The jury is still out, although everyone seems to want one. And along with tripods, various ball heads grabbed our attention. We even found a portable copy stand.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Feb 01, 2011 2 comments

In our recent photokina reports (January, 2011, issue) we covered products and trends at the show. Here’s a brief follow-up on some film and paper processing items and information on friends old and new, present and gone.

 

In our photokina reports we mentioned Kodak’s new film, of course, and Harman’s Direct Positive paper, and...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

Let’s consider, to start, the humble camera strap. Several models of sling strap were shown, designed to carry the camera over your shoulder and under your arm or even on your hip.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

Let’s be honest. One thing no one would have expected at photokina was a unique new black-and-white silver halide process. But that’s what we got. Well, not exactly brand new. It’s a revival of a technology that hasn’t been seen in decades, quite possibly not in the lifetime of many of our readers: direct reversal paper.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

In all probability, most photographers could gain more from investing in lighting equipment than from investing in new cameras. Not professionals, perhaps, though studio lighting continues to come on in leaps and bounds, but countless amateurs could greatly improve both the range and quality of their work.

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

One of the great things about photokina is that you find a lot of “straws in the wind”: not necessarily major introductions from major manufacturers, but intriguing indicators of which way the wind is blowing.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

The weirdest camera at the show, the GFAE, wasn’t even recognizable as a camera, not least because it was a view camera with the bellows left out in order to show its construction more clearly. We’ll come back to it later, but first, let’s look at some more conventional offerings.

George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

Our show report this year is an amalgam of product news and trend spotting, which pretty much reflects what photokina has stood for in our minds. The sense of a United Nations of photography still prevails at this increasingly European-directed show, but the image and its uses is still the universal tie that binds.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

Countless things appear at photokina that are not cameras, lenses, tripods, bags, materials, or lighting and studio. It’s part of the magic of the place. Calling this category “accessories” won’t do, because for most of us, “accessories” consist mostly of small things in blister packs: cable releases, lens caps, that sort of thing. At photokina, it can...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

There’s a new kid on the block when it comes to tripods, and they’re impressive, both in design and philosophy. Redged was founded in Holland by a nature photographer (Ed Dorrestein) and a sports and reportage photographer (Bart Bel) in order to get the kinds of tripods they personally wanted.

 

We weren’t the only ones who were impressed. This was...

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

Perhaps the hardest thing to convey about photokina is just how wide-ranging it is. Where else are you going to get an opinion, from a factory representative, about how much longer film coating is going to survive in Iran? The answer, incidentally, was “maybe two to three years.” Did you even know there was a coating line in Iran? Then there are Romanian photo-book machines, Turkish...

Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2010 1 comments

Photographers are notorious gadget hounds, always seeking some new little item that will help them in their quest to produce even better images. Following are unusual items that should help fill the average photographer’s need of something new and different.

Want to be able to see exactly what your D-SLR’s LCD is seeing, from over 300 feet away? And be able to...

Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

What’s new and different in gadgets and accessories this year? While digital has overtaken cameras it seems that many of the accessories we saw could be used as much on a film as a digital camera, proving that while there might not be much new under the sun there are certainly variations that bend with the technological tide.

Alpine Innovations’ D-Pod is an interesting...

Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

It’s a competitive world out there, so studios have to differentiate themselves with unique offerings and setups. Having a special line of albums or frames, or simply some stylish methods for their customers to display their precious photographs can help. A different background or method of more rapidly changing the background to suit the next sitting also helps. Here are some items that...

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