Travel Photography How To

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Cynthia Boylan  |  Jun 17, 2015  |  0 comments

COOPH (The Cooperative of Photography) recently partnered with photographer Ray Demski to create a video that highlights 14 smart and practical travel photo tips and tricks. The video, which is embedded below, was shot in beautiful Venice, Italy and features tips to make your photo adventure much easier, safer and more fun.

Jack Neubart  |  Jun 16, 2015  |  0 comments

Travel and nature photographer John Shaw lives his dream, traveling the world with his camera, without deadlines or obligations. His images go toward stock sales worldwide, in addition to being used in his many books. While he doesn’t shoot on assignment, magazine editors familiar with Shaw’s work will come to him when needed, or he’ll occasionally pitch story ideas to them when planning a trip.

Paul Reiffer  |  Jun 15, 2015  |  0 comments

Paul Reiffer is a commercial and landscape photographer who shoots with a Phase One medium format camera system. Reiffer is known for his city and landscape photography and he travels the globe extensively looking for the perfect shot. In this story, Reiffer offers ten tips on how to take the best vacation photos.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  May 08, 2015  |  0 comments

It’s not your typical image of that place then, which means Mirjam Evers has done her job well. She has images of the colorful chaos of revelers in full regalia, but the challenge is to get something special. “The travel publications I work for ask for something different and unusual,” Evers says. “She was posing, and most of the photographers were shooting from eye level, so I crouched down.”

Maria Piscopo  |  Apr 07, 2015  |  0 comments

The photography of natural disasters and human tragedy—from earthquakes to suicide bombers—is an area of photojournalism filled with challenges. Photojournalists often face both physical and emotional obstacles but still need to keep a cool head and continue capturing the images. While their photos will tell the story of the event, photographers have their own personal stories to tell as well. The accounts told here are mostly about business but also touch on the heart of why someone takes on this area of photography and keeps going despite the emotional toll. We discuss issues of privacy and model releases, working at a disaster scene, what agencies to coordinate with, handling injury and trauma, and the pros and cons of pursuing this work.

Blaine Harrington  |  Mar 06, 2015  |  0 comments

A recent shoot offered a spectacular setting, cooperative subjects, wonderful lighting, great colors, a number of advantageous positions from which to shoot—and a challenge for a travel photographer used to roaming cities and countryside in search of images.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Feb 20, 2015  |  0 comments

Not too long ago we received these notes from photographer Daryl Hawk about his April, 2014, journey across the kingdom of Ladakh:
“Traversed the entire region from the Pakistan border in the west to the Tibetan border in the east…crossed the Khardung pass at 18,380 feet on the highest motorable road in the world…lived with both nomads and residents…explored 25 ancient monasteries and fortresses…tracked snow leopards, discovered petroglyphs and sacred lakes…had a meeting and interview with the King of Ladakh.”

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Feb 18, 2015  |  0 comments

[Column Note: Most people come to professional photography by traveling a familiar route: from an early fascination with cameras, to photo classes and courses, followed by assisting a pro to gain some real-world experience. Then comes striking out on one's own as photographer, which, if all goes well, is followed by the frequent printing of invoices. Others, however, arrive at a pro career sideways—that is, coming at it from another occupation. The stories these "second career" pro photographers tell tend to be quite interesting, even inspirational. And those stories are what this new online column, titled Going Pro, is all about.]

Blaine Harrington  |  Dec 26, 2014  |  0 comments

According to a photo industry writer I know, I do something that’s a bit unusual: I freely admit that sometimes I’m too close to my own photographs to judge them objectively, and because of that, I ask for help.

Dan Havlik  |  Dec 22, 2014  |  0 comments

If the U.S. goes forward with its historic plan to open diplomatic ties with Cuba for the first time in 50 years, there will be a lot more photographers capturing this long isolated country. While Cuba hasn’t been entirely cut off photographically over the years, photo trips there have been limited and highly restricted.

Dan Havlik  |  Dec 18, 2014  |  0 comments

Here’s a story that should further warm U.S.-Cuba relations. A Cuban diver found an American tourist’s waterproof camera that was lost in the waves off the coast of Cuba two years ago, tracked her down on social media, and returned all her photo and videos.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Dec 10, 2014  |  0 comments

There is just over a month remaining for photographers to enter the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. The World Photography Organisation (WPO) announced the Honorary Judging Committee for the Professional competition yesterday and revealed a selection of some of the more head-turning submissions to the 2015 Open competition.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Dec 09, 2014  |  0 comments

DigitalGlobe has announced its 4th annual Top Satellite Images of the year contest and some of the contenders are pretty darn amazing. This year's top satellite photos were shot with the company's recently launched WorldView-3 satellite and include sky-high perspectives on a range of locations from around the world.

Hugh O. Smith  |  Oct 27, 2014  |  0 comments

Back in the 70’s when I started my photography career as a street photographer/photojournalist we had some pretty hefty equipment. Protecting it from the elements and potential thieves was our main concern. We didn’t have much in the way of small photo bags other than pricey leather ones that protected the gear but screamed: “Take me. I’m expensive!”

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Oct 16, 2014  |  0 comments

The unsung hero of our age is the rechargeable battery. Can you imagine using a cell phone, digital camera or notebook computer without high capacity, long lasting batteries? The battery technology of choice for the past several years has been Lithium Ion. Here are five things you need to know about it—for your own safety and convenience. 

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