Wildlife Photography How To

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Josh Miller  |  Jun 13, 2013  |  0 comments

At my workshops and lectures I am often asked by photographers how I am able to get sharp images at slow shutter speeds out of the affordable 70-300mm zoom I use for backpacking while they are unable to get sharp images with their 70-200 f/2.8 pro lenses. It is true that when it comes to lenses, the price tag does match the quality in terms of durability and sharpness at wide apertures. But by the time my carry-along backpacking lens is stopped down to f/8, it is nearly impossible to tell the difference between photos taken with it and images taken with the most expensive pro lenses. Honestly, the lack of sharpness in photos has less to do with the tele lens you are using than it might seem and more to do with long lens technique.

Moose Peterson  |  Jun 13, 2013  |  0 comments

Filing the frame with the critter isn’t required for great wildlife photography. Reflecting on how I first slanted my wildlife photography in this direction, it has its roots in the first lens I had to shoot wildlife. I started with a Vivitar 400mm f/5.6 on an old Minolta that was soon replaced with a Nikon 400mm f/5.6 on an F2. That 400mm was my main lens for a long time and it taught me lessons about wildlife photography that I still depend on to this day.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Aug 13, 2012  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2012  |  0 comments

Ron Magill is a trained zoologist and the communications director of the Miami-Dade Zoological Park and Gardens—Zoo Miami for short—and if you think that gives him an advantage when it comes to taking outstanding wildlife images, you’re right. But don’t turn the page. What’s needed to get a share of the wildlife “Wow!” factor is technique, access, and information that’s available to all. You will also need dedication and persistence. Above all, be sure to pack your patience along with your camera and lenses.

Mike Stensvold  |  May 01, 2004  |  0 comments

 

 

 

 

 

 

You don't need a lot of fancy equipment to get good bird photos. Professional bird photographers do use some serious items (the 600mm f/4 supertelephoto lens favored by many costs more than my whole "bird" outfit, which includes both 35mm and digital AF SLR bodies), and you probably need similar gear and...

Lynne Eodice  |  Mar 01, 2004  |  0 comments

All Photos by Cappy Jackson

 

A prize-winning photographer who's best known for her equestrian images, Cappy Jackson got an early start. At age 14 she became an assistant to an established pro, Peter Winants, who was the staff photographer for a magazine called Maryland...

Lynne Eodice  |  Mar 01, 2004  |  0 comments

All Photos by Abe Ordover

 

Abe Ordover is a nature photographer who combines his camera work with Adobe Photoshop to create images that are uniquely his own; photographs that reveal to the viewer what Ordover felt when he shot the scene.
He's traveled worldwide to...

Lynne Eodice  |  Mar 01, 2004  |  0 comments

 

 

 

One of the most challenging—and gratifying—subjects to photograph is wildlife. The primary obstacle is getting close enough to wild animals to take dramatic photos of them. Your best bet is a telephoto lens—a few point-and-shoot film cameras offer built-in zooms as long as 200mm at the telephoto end, and...

Lynne Eodice  |  Oct 01, 2003  |  2 comments

 

 

 

 

Many of us have pets that share our home and are considered to be members of the family. If you enjoy photography, naturally you'll want to take pictures of your furry friends. Great-looking pet images can be achieved without having to invest in expensive photo gear. In fact, a lightweight point-and-shoot camera is a...

Lynne Eodice  |  Jul 01, 2003  |  14 comments

All photos by Chris Ameruoso unless otherwise indicated

 

By the end of 1998, Chris Ameruoso found himself at a major crossroad. As someone who had spent most of his youth performing in a family rock band, he had moved to Los Angeles about 10 years previously "with a dream of music." Then suddenly he switched gears, and found his calling shooting portraits of...

Lynne Eodice  |  Oct 01, 2000  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2000  |  0 comments

 

 

 

 

Photographing wildlife presents special challenges, especially if you own a compact camera. You may not have the powerful lenses that professionals use, but you can still do nicely with a moderate telephoto setting on your point-and-shoot camera, if it has one. As with household pets, wild animals...

Pages

X