Photo How To

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Cynthia Boylan  |  Jul 14, 2015  |  0 comments

Want to take better and more interesting photos with your smartphone? COOPH (The Cooperative of Photography) recently partnered with photographer Richard Schabetsberger to create a great new how-to video for fantastic smartphone photography.

Maria Piscopo  |  Jul 07, 2015  |  0 comments

Since technologies of database management (direct mail) and Internet marketing (websites) have cut into the advertising agencies’ “lock” on buying media space as the only way to sell products and services, the industry has scrambled to reinvent itself. As a result, photographers have felt an impact on their advertising photography businesses.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jun 26, 2015  |  0 comments

Ever wish you could make the sky more blue without changing the foreground color and without tweaking the image with software? Or maybe give a daytime shot that sunset look? Welcome to the world of square graduated filters. Welcome to the world of Cokin.

George Schaub  |  Jun 24, 2015  |  0 comments

Exposure systems in digital cameras are highly sophisticated components that can analyze light, contrast, color and all the aspects of a photo instantly. Yet with all the automation and computerization there’s still the need to understand how to get the most from all the available options, to know when to choose a particular mode or metering pattern, when you can rely on automation and when you need to step in to get the best exposure possible. This set of tips deals with the creative use of the various Exposure modes, metering patterns, bracketing features and more.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Jun 17, 2015  |  0 comments

COOPH (The Cooperative of Photography) recently partnered with photographer Ray Demski to create a video that highlights 14 smart and practical travel photo tips and tricks. The video, which is embedded below, was shot in beautiful Venice, Italy and features tips to make your photo adventure much easier, safer and more fun.

George Schaub  |  May 26, 2015  |  0 comments

A camera enforces a “framing” of the world before you. While you can choose various aspect ratios (from standard to panoramic, from 3:4 to 6:19) the fact remains that you always have to choose what to include and what to leave out of the photo. It’s like constructing a box and deciding what to put inside it. Making those decisions often involves utilizing certain compositional guidelines and tools that artists have used in the past, although like any rules they “are made to be broken.” When deciding which guidelines to apply always remember that content rules, and that context helps tell the tale.

Maria Piscopo  |  May 15, 2015  |  2 comments

This is one of my favorite topics: photographers doing good works by donating photography services to charities and other nonprofit organizations. In this column, I’ll look at how to make a living while making a difference. For starters, donating your photography to a good cause will help you develop business skills. It will also give you access to people and places for portfolio development and allow you to meet an amazing network of new friends. Organizations you can donate your photography to range from local to global and cover a variety of issues from healthcare and education to shelter animals. Sincere thanks to our contributors for their work: Luke Copping, Tim Courtney, Cathy Greenblat, and Isaac Howard (websites at end of column).

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 14, 2015  |  0 comments

Last week we listed seven ways to improve picture taking at indoor school events. This week the focus shifts to outdoor school activities. Of course, there’s nothing stopping you from applying these tips to other situations—family reunions, company picnics, county fairs—almost anything outside that’s fun, loud and involves people. 

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 07, 2015  |  0 comments

I saw you in the high school gym last night, clicking away with your DSLR and long telephoto zoom. You weren’t obnoxious like the lady behind you who kept firing her point-and-shoot—with flash—from fifty feet away, or the couple who held their cell phones high above their heads (they were either shooting video, playing 3D Candy Crush or signaling their alien Mother Ship, I couldn’t tell which). But I felt sorry for you, because I could tell that your photos would turn out crappy. 

Blaine Harrington  |  May 05, 2015  |  1 comments

Here are some of the questions I asked myself on the way to taking some of the photos you see accompanying this column:
• How am I going to find a father and son trekking through snow?
• How long is this fog going to last?
• Police tape? What’s police tape doing here?
• Is this rain ever going to stop?

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 04, 2015  |  0 comments

You don’t need three magic wishes to make your Mac or PC more digital photography-friendly. Here are five ways anyone can upgrade their computer to improve the speed and efficiency of Photoshop, expand storage space for all those Raw image files, add room for unlimited back-ups of your photo archive and make the whole shebang more secure—without touching a screwdriver.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Apr 23, 2015  |  0 comments

Just as certain as the crocus and grape hyacinth that burst on the scene seemingly from nowhere, another sure sign of spring is my reliance on a few familiar gadgets to help me celebrate the season. Here are three of the accessories I’d be hard pressed to do without.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Apr 03, 2015  |  0 comments

When the rain stopped, Shawn Clover was on the pedestrian bridge over the street at the Embarcadero Center in San Francisco, waiting for someone interesting to come by. He ended up photographing 14 interesting people, one frame for each. This is the image he chose to post to Flickr.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Mar 30, 2015  |  0 comments

I recently attended the TICO Warbird Airshow (which is affiliated with the local Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum), an event held at the Space Coast Regional Airport in Florida each March. This popular three-day event always attracts a large crowd and a good number of people sporting pro-quality DSLRs with huge (high tech, super expensive) lenses attached and a gear bag stuffed full of amazing (also super expensive) photo accessories.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Mar 27, 2015  |  0 comments

A unique way to create complex geometric, multicolored designs is to attach tiny Christmas tree lights to a bicycle wheel and spin it in a dark room or outside at night. I found 7 ft of Christmas lights powered by 3 AA batteries online for about $12, and that was just enough to cover the entire circumference of the front wheel of my son’s medium sized bike. I took the wheel off the bike with a simple crescent wrench and used black electrician’s tape to affix the lights and the wires onto the rim, figure A.

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