Jack Neubart

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2006 0 comments

On a recent trip to Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, I had a choice of several of Lowepro's photo backpacks. I would load one up, try it on, and do the same with each in turn. Even though I received the DryZone Rover for the express purpose of testing it, I wasn't about to sacrifice my trip and take a bag ill-suited to the task. Among the bags at my disposal were the...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

When I first heard about a 35mm focal length macro lens my mouth began to water. The $229 price tag was an immediate inducement, as were the compactness and lightweight of this glass. What threw me, though, was the focal length. Because this was in the new Four Thirds System for an Olympus digital SLR (the EVOLT E-300 was used for this test), focal length doubled to 70mm. A 70mm...

Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

If there's one thing I learned from working on my latest book, Studio Lighting Solutions (Amphoto, 2005), there is a light specially suited to every subject and situation. Pro photographers find exactly what they need, and if it's not the exact solution, they fashion it to their needs with the addition of various accessories.

So when I entered the...

Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Today's high-resolution digital cameras eat up lots of memory. High-capacity memory cards cost as much as a portable hard drive, so why not use a portable storage device and transfer card memory to that drive? Portable hard drives are battery-driven and most employ a 2.5" disk drive, while a few use the more expensive 1.8" drive. As an alternative there are...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

The obvious big news at this year's show was the "proliferation" of pigmented ink-based printers--and with that comes a new level of inks and print longevity. We used to think that pigmented inks could not deliver the color saturation and punch of dye-based inks, but that no longer appears to be the case with this new generation of inksets with expanded...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: May 22, 2006 0 comments

On the road, it's not always about transferring picture files to a portable
device. Many of us take our laptop computers with us, transferring pictures
directly to the computer, often for immediate previews while shooting on assignment.
And what folly that is without some means of backing up those pictures from...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

If I could, I'd spend all my time hunting down bugs and lizards and any other critters small enough to fit inside a macro lens. Simply stated, I love macro. So I couldn't wait to put the new EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro lens through its paces on my Canon EOS 20D digital SLR.

As you may already know, EF-S is Canon's designation for APS-C-dedicated lenses...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

It wasn't too long ago that Nickel Cadmium (NiCd) technology was all the rage in rechargeable batteries--until someone discovered that the heavy metals are an environmental nightmare. As a result, many companies switched over to Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH), or Nickel Hydride for short (NiHy), which is arguably more environmentally friendly. NiCd battery systems are...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Feb 01, 2006 0 comments

Handheld exposure meters have grown increasingly complex over the years. At the same time, they are proving even more utilitarian for a wider range of shooting situations. All of this thanks to microprocessor control. I won't go into the long history of their evolution, but suffice to say that today's high-tech marvels are something else entirely. And the new Sekonic...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

The Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM (16-35mm equivalent in 35mm parlance) was designed to cover the APS-C format, specifically the EOS 20D and both EOS Digital Rebels (plus future APS-C models). Canon's EF-S lenses (S = Short Back Focus) are physically matched to these cameras. This design also results in a smaller and lighter lens (3.5" long and less than 14 oz).

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading